Discovery of Moldy Books Leads to Some Serious Weeding

Maybe everyone should go on a toxic mold seeking expedition. The discovery of some moldy books in the Lower Pottsgrove Elementary School Library in Pennsylvania, led the librarian to uncover the fact that much of their collection was outdated and needed to be discarded anyway. [more...] from The Mercury.

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More Than 800 Residents Seek Removal of Library Board Members

This one comes from Lake City, MI. It\'s a couple of months old, but I\'ve never heard of anything like this happening. [more...] from Cadillac News.

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Porn sneaks past search filters

News.com is running This Story on the shortcomings of porn filters, and the rather daunting task they have keeping up.

It seems the new search engine for images at Google misses more than a few naked bodies, with the saftey turned on.

\"If you do some sort of flesh detector, what color is flesh?\" Wilde asked rhetorically. \"It\'s really that complex. And then what\'s pornographic? You have different sensitivities, especially internationally. Then there\'s hate, weapons and violence. It\'s a really, really difficult problem to solve.\"

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3 Million Pounds of History

A great profile in the New York Times of the trials, travails, and impressive holdings of the Municipal Archives of the City of New York.

The collection — three million pounds of material, ranging from the original 1654 Dutch sales slip for the purchase of Coney Island, to a trove of stereoscopic Victorian pornography assembled by an antivice crusader — has weathered centuries of profound neglect. It has been appallingly lodged in a succession of makeshift spaces, including a city pier and the attic of a fire-prone pizza parlor. . .an improbable thing has happened as archivists have made these records available to scholars in recent years: New York City\'s history has been rewritten.

Pet peeve about newspapers\' online sites

Kirstin Dougan writes \"As a LIS student and someone who reads a lot of news-related blogs, I have noticed a disturbing trend.


A lot of online newspaper sites don\'t clearly indicate what city or state they are from. Of course, some of them are obvious (e.g. Detroit Free Press), but some, like the \"Journal-Standard\" (in the LISNews article on the Freeport Public Library), give no indication what city they are published in.
Often the byline includes the city and not the state, which, if it is a small town, is not usually enough to pinpoint what state it is in. Perhaps they assume that only locals read the online stories, however, with the proliferation of blogs and ezines, this is not true. Am I the only one who wants to know _where_ some of these stories are occuring? (without having to dig for a colophon that may be many clicks away or non-existent)

More....

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Guinness Book of Records Sold

From The Dispatch Online (London, UK)...

\"The Guinness Book of Records, the benchmark reference of the world\'s feats and sporting facts, has been sold to a new owner for about R5 billion.\" Geez. I wonder if they\'ll change the name? [more...]

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Free Online Scholarship Newsletter

Peter
Suber
writes \"LISNews readers might be
interested in the Free Online Scholarship (FOS)
Newsletter. It is devoted to the migration of print
scholarship to the internet, in all the fields of the
sciences and humanities, and to efforts to make it
available free of charge. Subscriptions, of course, are
free.


ht
tp://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/index.htm
\"

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A Non Research Doctor of Library Science?

Elizabeth Christian writes:\" A one year ALA
accredited degree is just the beginning of library
education. However, what is available after
that is the choice, either a research based library
school research degree that is applicable primarily to
teaching in a library school, not to practice.


There have been some practice based doctorates, but
it is now time to encourage library schools to move into
this area. New options for web based education make
this now easier for library schools to provide this
degree to practitioners.


This is a survey to determine if in fact there is an
interest and what kind of degree would be desirable
from the practioners\' perspective. \"

Here\'s A Link to the survey, or you
can reach her by email @ echristian2 at yahoo.com

How I now ended up packing to move to Aruba!

Richard R.
Shook
has written a nice look at how he found a
job in sunny Aruba. If you\'ve ever thought of getting out
of North America, see how he did it, and maybe you can
join him!
He writes:

\"On March 3 I signed a contract to be the
Librarian at the International School of Aruba. On my
school librarians‚ listserv (lm_net) over 30 librarians
asked me questions and then I was asked to jot a few
notes about the experience of finding an international
school job. Here, I\'ll try to address these requests.

\"20,000 librarians with credit cards . . . \"

Publishers Weekly\'s assessment of ALA 2001:

An upbeat spirit on the show floor was directly related to reports that, with few geographic exceptions, library budgets continue to grow. And although libraries are spending more money on electronic equipment and digital information, they are also buying more books. George Coe, CEO of Baker & Taylor Library Services, said his company\'s library business continues to expand: \"Our business is up considerably over last year. This is a great show for us.\"

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NYT Book Reviews back issues before 1996 Gone

Mary Minow writes \"One of our eagle-eyed bibliographers found This Today on the NY Times site:

\"Search The New York Times on the Web Books


* Books Archive: For the past four years, it has been our pleasure to provide a full-text search of the New York Times Books archive of reviews, news and author interviews dating back to 1980.


To comply with a recent United States Supreme Court decision, we are limiting that search to the period from January 1, 1996 to the present. In the period prior to 1996, The Times typically did not have written agreements with freelance book reviewers to permit republishing reviews in
electronic form.

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Anchorage Mayor to ban all nonlibrary displays

Mary Minow passed along This Story from the Anchorage Daily News on the big gay pride exhibit at the Anchorage city library. It seems his lawyer said \"Don\'t put it back up and don\'t allow displays by other nonlibrary groups\", so he did.
The group will begin to review the exhibit policy.

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Library Operations Outsourced in TX

Mary Musgrave passed along This Dallasnews.com Story on the decision that will hand over operations of its new Lancaster Veterans Memorial Library to a company based near Washington, D.C. [LSSI].

They say the facility still belongs to the city and the council still makes all policy decisions and library employees would keep their jobs.

\"They wanted to make the hours the library was opened more in line with what the community wanted – maybe Sunday afternoons,\" Mrs. Filgo said. \"We haven\'t had a library director since February, and I feel like we\'re to a point where we need some professional help. We\'ve had good professionals, but [LSSI] brings expertise from a national standpoint.\"

Teachers vs. Librarians, Live from the Beehive State

Tanya writes \"The Granite School District Board of Education in Salt Lake City, UT has voted to eliminate school librarian positions if the local teachers association requests a pay raise over 1.4%. Have the board members been watching the Sopranos to brush up on their strongarm tactics? This is the classic, \"If you do what I say, I won\'t shoot the girl\" scenario. According to the Board Report, if the teachers association wants higher raises, the 35 librarians will be moved to teaching positions and the media centers will be staffed with media \"assistants\" who will be paid hourly. The claim is that this move will save $1 million dollars (imagine Dr. Evil\'s glee!)


To read the report visit granite.k12.ut.us
then click on BOARD REPORT about halfway down the page.
\"

Hacker Invades Library

Jason Kristufek writes...

\"A computer hacker got into the Burlington Library\'s Internet Web site and put \"drug-related and nasty words\" on the site\'s main page, Library Director Kay Weiss said. Weiss does not know the exact time the main page displayed the disparaging and drug-related words, and no one other than library employees has said that they saw it. \"It was just a coincidence that about three weeks ago someone developed a program that sniffs out weaknesses in Web sites and then relays them to hackers,\" Weiss told the Library Board.\" [more...] from The Hawkeye.

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Library Criticized for Building Plans

The Freeport Public Library is undergoing some major changes. People are complaining because the new library will have a meeting room and a coffee shop. The coffee shop was requested by patrons and a meeting room is always something that can benefit the library and the community. I guess ya just can\'t please some people. [more...] from The Journal Standard.
And, here\'s even more.

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A New York Library and University of Pittsburgh Clash Over Documents

This sounds almost like a custody battle of sorts, but it\'s over some documents. They\'ll either go to one library, or the other, or they\'ll \"visit\" both. [more...] from The Pittsburgh Tribune Review. Even more here from The Pittsburgh Post Gazzette.

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Book returned nearly 73 years late

Bill sent along This Story on a man that returned a slightly worn, hardback copy of \"Les Miserables,\" due back to the old Covington Library on Sept. 24, 1928. Library officials said they considered some kind of fine, but decided just to let the man go on the day he returned it in late May.

Good thing he didn\'t try this in Minnesota, he\'d be whisked off to jail!

An Animiated History of Books

The BBC has a cool new site called An Animated History of Books.

They start with cave paintings and go right on through today, and beyond. Comes complete with disembodied, floating, talking head of Shakespeare.

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Post-Tasini: Pity the Librarians

Kendra Mayfield writes...
\"For publishers reeling from a recent Supreme Court loss, it\'s time to pay freelancers whose work has been republished in electronic databases without their permission. But rather than pay up or face billions in liabilities, publishers are deleting tens of thousands of freelance articles spanning decades. So who will bear the brunt of that extra work? The librarians, of course.\" [more...] from Wired.

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