In an Age Where Criminals are Hardened, but Well Read...

The Library police in Texas are issuing arrest warrants for people who refuse to return overdue library books. Perpetrators get four chances, which seems pretty lenient considering there was a time when the norm was three strikes and you\'re out. Anyway, the maximum sentence - 6 months in the slammer and $2000. more... from Anorak.

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Eudora Welty May Have Left Unpublished Work

From The Chicago Sun Times, Jason Straziuso writes...

\"Eudora Welty, who died last week at age 92, published no new fiction after 1973. But she spent years typing away, raising the tantalizing possibility that there is unpublished work sitting in her attic. Welty was one of the 20th century\'s most beloved authors and the first living writer to be given her own volume in the prestigious Library of America series. Any posthumous work would attract widespread interest.\" more...

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Jail Time in the Digital Age

Copyright scholar (and Electronic Frontier Foundation board member) Lawrence Lessing neatly skewers the DMCA:

The D.M.C.A. outlaws technologies designed to circumvent other technologies that protect copyrighted material. It is law protecting software code protecting copyright. The trouble, however, is that technologies that protect copyrighted material are never as subtle as the law of copyright. Copyright law permits fair use of copyrighted material; technologies that protect copyrighted material need not. Copyright law protects for a limited time; technologies have no such limit. Thus when the D.M.C.A. protects technology that in turn protects copyrighted material, it often protects much more broadly than copyright law does. It makes criminal what copyright law would forgive. (More from the New York Times.)

A tip of the pen to Metafilter.

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Ask Slashdot: Computer Books For A Library?

Who would\'ve ever though Slashdot would be a good Collection Development source?
Not me, but it turns out we were all wrong.

This Ask Slashdot story is from a fellow looking for recommendations on what computer books to buy for a library. As always the slashdot masses came through in spectacular fashion with many good ideas.
So if you are in need of some ideas for the library at home or work, check it out.

Big Magazines get Bigger

Carrie writes \" This New York Times Story New York Times Story describes how so many of the smaller magazines are being bought out by larger magazines. \"


Consolidation in the publishing industry continues...

Last week, Time Inc. bought the British company IPC Media P.L.C., and recently bought Business 2.0.

Primedia bought Emap USA, Earlier this year,
Advance Publications bought The Golf Digest Companies, and Gruner
& Jahr, a unit of Bertelsmann, closed deals for Inc. and Fast Company.
etc....

\"Everything is for sale now,\" Chip Block, the publishing strategist at
Ziff- Davis Publishing, said. \"You have a situation where people would
love to bail out if they can. A guy who last year wouldn\'t budge for
$200 million might look out there today and say, `Guess what? $80
million will suit me just fine.\' \"

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U.S. Ties to Death Squads Accidently Leaked to Libraries

The Times reports that the U.S. Government Printing Office has mistakenly issued to libraries a report linking the U.S. to anti-Communist death squads in Indonesia:

The American Government is trying to claw back copies of a book that reveals US links to Sixties anti-communist death squads in Indonesia. Copies of the declassified history were prematurely distributed to libraries around the world. It contains details of how the US Embassy in Indonesia supplied names of members of the Communist PKI party which backed President Sukarno, the founding father of the republic, to the Indonesian security forces. Those forces massacred more than 100,000 people.(More)

The report can be found here. Thanks to New Breed Librarian.

Libraries are for socialist welfare scum

I was browsing around Google Groups, and I came across this rant, which concludes, "The simple truth is that Libraries are nothing more than an immoral and illegal form of welfare."

I\'m not sure whether this is genuine looney libertarian extremism, or a parody of same.

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British Library closing Indian library

Matt Eberle
writes \"The British Council library in Patna, India is
closing. The library is reportedly being closed because
it has only 1,400 members. Members say this is
because the library has only 8,000 books and only 80
people can occupy the reading room at once.

Full Story

Membership (bclindia.o
rg
) appears to be 400
Rupees annually \"

More School Librarian Job Shifting...

Tanya writes \"I found this story
while catching up on the news from my former
stomping grounds. The Jeff Parish School System, of
which I\'m a product, is considering cutting librarian
positions in the elementary schools due to budget
problems. Supposedly the culprit is rising health care
costs. Also on the cutting block are athletic programs
and custodial and clerical positions. Just as in Salt
Lake a few weeks ago, the librarians will be moved to
teaching positions. The article contains some great
quotes from people who oppose the move such as this
one:

\"Of all the proposals, Roberts said he is most opposed
to cutting librarians
because of their influence on academics.\"

And this one:

\"Losing the librarians and sports would have the most
negative impact on
children, said Sally Falcone...\"


Read the story HERE
\"

City Library, County Library

Sheez baaaack!

Wow, it looks like libraryland has been quite a happenin place lately. Where do I begin? I\'ll spare you all the details of my great vacation and just get down to business. I\'ve reported a few times on the woes at the Enoch Pratt Free Library system in Baltimore. Today the numbers were released. One branch only circulated 15,261 items in the last fiscal year. It doesn\'t stop there. According to the article, \"in 1993 the county library system was in the Top 5 nationwide and had the largest use per capita. Today, it doesn\'t even have the highest per-capita usage in the state.\" more... from SunSpot News.

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Baker\'s book front-page news

The front page of today\'s Chicago Tribune (at least the suburban print edition I get) includes an article headlined Libraries in lurch as microfilm flaws surface. It focuses on Double Fold, but the reporter also appears to have talked to some librarians. The acting head of the Center for Research Libraries is quoted as saying that "Baker\'s book is the new Silent Spring."

Of course, looking at the story on the Web, you don\'t know that it\'s front-page news.

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Looking For Latino Librarians

Julio Santillán Aldana is looking to contact Spanish speaking Latino Librarians here in the States and elsewhere.

He runs a little magazine down in Peru called Bilbios.

Check it out, you can also reach him by email at:
santillan@peru.com

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Library showing the good and the bad in vodka

The Vodka Library is situated 200 miles north of Moscow in the Russian town of Uglich on the Volga, hometown of Pyotr Arseneyevich Smirnov, founder of the Smirnoff brand. No books, just thousands of bottles of vodka encased in glass. It aims to celebrate the national drink but also to educate on the problems its consumption can cause.
\"Vodka has never done anything good, but without it, Russia would not exist\"
So you can get a taste test but also a lecture on responsible drinking. The full shot glass from The Boston Globe.

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The changing role of libraries

The face of public libraries in the US is changing, according to this story from The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. New library buildings are designed for this new role.
\"People view libraries today more as \"information brokers,\" he said. Visitors expect a wider range of services, which includes access to computers, educational programs for children and places to meet and exchange ideas.\"

Librarians, Librarians Everywhere

Indian state campaigns to keep British library

The decision of the British government to close the British Council library in the Indian state of Bihar has led to widespread protests and the creation of an Association to Save the British Library. Bihar has the lowest literary rate of all Indian states (47.53 per cent) and the library\'s supporters feel the loss of the library would only make things worse. However, the British government argue that the library is not viable. The the full story from the Khaleej Times.

E-Books and their Future in Academic Libraries

A technically detailed assessment from someone in the trenches:

The University of California\'s California Digital Library (CDL) formed an Ebook Task Force in August 2000 to evaluate academic libraries\' experiences with electronic books (e-books), investigate the e-book market, and develop operating guidelines, principles and potential strategies for further exploration of the use of e-books at the University of California (UC). This article, based on the findings and recommendations of the Task Force Report [1], briefly summarizes task force findings, and outlines issues and recommendations for making e-books viable over the long term in the academic environment, based on the long-term goals of building strong research collections and providing high level services and collections to its users.

(More from D-Lib.)

U.S. Greatly Increases Budget for Copyright Enforcement

The U.S. Department of Justice\'s new budget includes greatly expanded funding for enforcement of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act:

The Senate has earmarked $10 million for copyright prosecutions, enough money for 155 agents and attorneys in the fiscal year starting in October. That\'s up from a current $4 million allocated for 75 positions. . . \"We are very pleased with the amount. It\'s going to be used to prevent a whole lot of Internet piracy and mischief,\" said Patricia Schroeder, president of the Association of American Publishers. \"If someone crashed the international banking community, it wouldn\'t be too funny,\" Schroeder said. \"The Department of Justice wants to send the message that this is not a joke. You really could put someone out of business.\" (More from Wired.)

Search Engines and Editorial Integrity

More on the growing trend toward search engines ranking query results based on payments made by advertisors:

Many of us in the new media industry have watched in despair during the past few months as several major search engines have abandoned all pretense at editorial integrity by adopting deceptive, misleading advertising practices at the expense of their users.Finally, someone has stood up and said, Enough is enough. And now it\'s time for the rest of us to join the battle as well. (More from the Online Journalism Review.)

Thanks to the always valuable Wood s Lot.

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U.S. Will Not Free Sklyarov

The U.S. Attorney\'s office has indicated that it will not drop charges against Dmitri Sklyarov:

Representatives of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) met with representatives of the U.S. Attorney\'s office in San Francisco today. There was a productive dialog, however the U.S. Attorney\'s office gave no indication of dropping the prosecution against Dmitry Sklyarov. Having explored good faith negotiations, the Electronic Frontier Foundation rejoins the call for nonviolent protests worldwide to secure the immediate release of Dmitry Sklyarov and dropping of all criminal charges against him. A protest is already scheduled in San Francisco for 11:30am this Monday, July 30, at the Federal Courthouse at 450 Golden Gate Ave. Additional protests will occur in 25 or more cities worldwide in coming weeks.

( More from FreeSklyarov.org. Thanks to Slashdot.)

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