Seattle\'s online services well received

Ben Ostrowsky Writes:

The
King County
Library System
in
Seattle has gotten some
great publicity in the
Seattle Times recently.

I can go to my local library and take out a wide range of
fiction and
nonfiction materials. But, when looking for information
on a specific
topic, the most useful books often reside at other
libraries, are checked
out or can\'t leave the building. Yet, if I search the
Internet at home, I
can usually find the information I need, instantly.

Well, maybe not all the information I need, or at least as
many
authoritative sources as I should have to be
well-informed. It turns out
the library has precious online resources that are
available only through
a library\'s Web site.

In-tents Librarians

R Hadden Writes:
The Wall Street Journal has an item on today\'s front
page (Tuesday,
August 29, 2000) in the \"Work Week\" column, about a
library.
\"Inspiration hit Charles \"Duke\" Oakley one day as he
cruised past a
Cirque du Soleil big top. Mr. Oakley, then facilities
director for the
University of California at Los Angeles, decided a tent
would make a fine
temporary library. So the school built a
36,000-square-foot vinyl fabric
affair, complete with aluminum skeleton, lights and fire
sprinklers....
UCLA\'s Mr. Oakley, now in private practice, ...misses
the temporary
library since it was taken down. \"It was a little festive,
and it was a
little unusual,\" he says.\"`

There is no indication of when this event
happened, nor any comments
from the library staff about library concerns such as
insect control or
humidity levels or potential for vandalism. -- Read More

@yourlibrary

ALA recently paid a PR firm a huge sum of money for a branding campaign, which was unveiled at the annual conference in July. Called \"@yourlibrary,\" the campaign gives libraries the opportunity to use the famous \"@\" sign to market their services. A television ad showing how exciting and electronic libraries really are was shown to conference goers at the opening session. ALA\'s announcement of the campaign is worth reading, as is a discussion about it on the ALA Council listserv, published in a recent Library Juice.

Searchonomics: Incentives for Infomediaries

Wherewithal founders Steve Thomas and Darrin Skinner have spent two years designing a powerful search technology which is scalable to the growth of the Internet. They believe they have overcome the fixed taxonomy problem that limits the usefulness of conventional web directories like Looksmart, ODP, and Yahoo. This
article at Traffick
takes an early look at this fledgling service.

Another fledgling directory using volunteer reviewers is Zeal. Zeal\'s volunteers gain points which can be exchanged for charitable donations. This is Traffick\'s review of Zeal: \"Volunteer Directory Seeks Zealots.\" -- Read More

Time Limited E-Textbooks

Slashdot had a very interesting post yesterday\"Vital Source Technologies is now providing time-limited medical textbooks to universities. Password protected books as predicted in The Right To Read by Richard Stallman are finally becoming a reality.\" Starting on Oct. 28, (when the other part of the DMCA comes into effect), you could face a civil lawsuit and criminal penalties of up to five years in jail and a fine of $500,000 for reading someone else\'s textbook. See the NYU FAQ, the Advogato discussion, or the company crowing about new revenue opportunities.

As always, the Comments on Slashdot are very interesting.

Literature and a Latte

Ever Helpful R. Hadden Writes:\"

A new public library in Howard County is borrowing a page
from the corporate booksellers\' manual: Give the customers
convenience, comfy furniture and cappuccino.

Read The Story in the Washington Post.

\"Even those who hate mega-bookstores can see their formula is working. People flock to the stores, where they can linger for hours, catch a poetry reading, browse racks of magazines and newspapers and fill up on latte and scones.\"

Dave Barry on Harry Potter

Ben Ostrowsky writes :Dave Barry had a funny piece on
Harry Potter
a few weeks ago.

\"
I am NOT jealous of the woman who writes the Harry Potter books. It does
NOT bother me that her most recent book, Harry Potter and the Enormous
Royalty Check
, has already become the best-selling book in world
history, beating out her previous book, Harry Potter Purchases
Microsoft
.

Amazonian Microserf E-Books

david writes \"mildly interesting. But B&N is ahead of amazon, i think...

Cnnfn.com has the full short Story

Software giant Microsoft Corp. and top online retailer Amazon.com Inc. on Monday said they are teaming up to sell digital books in the latest boost to the electronic alternative to paper and ink.

Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft\'s Reader software for downloading and displaying digital text on a computer screen or handheld computer, the companies said.
\"

If it\'s for the children it must be good

Brian writes \"Often-clueless columnist Bob Greene of the Chicago Tribune is encouraging people to donate their used books to needy libraries in Chicago Public Schools. I have a feeling this will end badly, with the school system deluged with unusable crap.

Chicagotribune.com has the Story

\"

E-Books in Seybold Spotlight

Wired has a Story on The Seybold SF conference that covers all things publishing, including a big focus on Ebooks. The conference web site has a nifty
Digital Library that has some useful information on technology.

\"E-book vendors will take over 11,000 square feet on the show floor to showcase their technologies and security solutions.

Microsoft (MSFT) will demonstrate its recently announced Digital Asset Server, a digital rights management (DRM) solution, and Windows-based PC Reader. \" -- Read More

It is not just the books

Sometimes it\'s not just the selection of books that brings kids into the library. As this article from the Tampa Tribune explains, it may be the appearance of the library itself.\"But it wasn\'t the books that added the sparkle - it was the bright, welcoming lighting. And the shiny new shelves, the spotless circulation desk, the chairs with nary a pencil gouge nor wad of gum stuck underneath.\" -- Read More

Monday Studio B Buzz Highlights

Zzzzzzzz... Yo, it\'s Monday, and today\'s highlights include an expected increase in book sales, what the California energy crisis is doing to bookstores, and selling used books for fun and profit (mostly profit). Get thee the buzz! Or at least the highlights.... -- Read More

Progressive Librarians Guild

Progressive Librarians Guild, an affiliate organization of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association, was formed in January 1990 by a group of librarians concerned with our profession\'s rapid drift into dubious alliances with business and the information industry, and into complacent acceptance of service to the political, economic and cultural status quo.


The development of public libraries was spurred by popular sentiment which held that real democracy requires an enlightened citizenry, and that society should provide all people with the means for free intellectual development. Current trends in librarianship assert that the library is merely a neutral mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society.


Members of PLG do not accept this notion of neutrality, and we strongly oppose the commodification of information. We will help to dissect the implications of these powerful trends, and fight their anti-democratic tendency. -- Read More

The instant library

The Detroit Free
Press
has a typical story on how great the web is
for education.

\"Students say it\'s easier to do research on the
Internet than in the library, where they say they have to
struggle with confusing reference cards and outdated
books. Parents also don\'t have to worry about taking
their kids to the library. \" -- Read More

Fargo library director talks about his behavior

In-Forum.com has an Interview with Fargo Public Library Director
Dave Davis. If you haven\'t heard the full story, they also
have a summary that will bring you up to speed.

\"During a library meeting March 1, Davis told
employee Cynthia Wray, who was eight-months
pregnant: “I just can’t stand looking at you ... with your
hands like that you look like you’re stuffed.” He then
turned his back on her. Davis later apologized after
being told to do so. \"

In the interview he
says:Has it been difficult for you to
communicate with the employees?

\"Not to my knowledge it hasn’t. It’s show time. My
mother raised me to be a gentleman … and my wife
expects me to be a gentleman, too. Besides, I’ve found
in life I don’t hold grudges. That’s just not a Dave Davis
personality. \" -- Read More

40th anniversary of library sit-ins marked

Charleston.net has a Story on the sit ins that started On July
16, 1960. On Sept. 19, 1960, the library was integrated.

\"\"All we wanted was to use a public library that
our parents worked hard to help pay for,\" said Margaree
Crosby, who was among the eight arrested, handcuffed
and taken to the city jail for holding a sit-in at the
whites-only library on North Main Street 40 years
ago.\" -- Read More

Library union OKs pact

The Final Story in the
librarian strike saga (Hopefully).

\"The members
of District 925 of the Service Employees International
Union had approved the three-year tentative agreement,
89-3. “Oh my goodness, that makes me really happy,”
said Library Director Nan Johnston, who was notified of
the tally by telephone.\"


Back to work at last.

Strikers Not Sure What to Expect

The Canton
Rep
is Now Reporting the strike
may not be quite as over as we once thought.

“This could be the ‘Dewey beats Truman’
headline of the day,” assistant Library Director Marge
Baker said early Friday afternoon, referring to the
infamous Chicago Tribune headline that appeared after
the 1948 presidential election.\" -- Read More

Filtering Follies

I couldn\'t resist posting this article from the Digital Freedom Network. Does your name contain a vulgarity? If so, read on...\"Babcock and Engineer are not the only ones who have been blocked by online filters. People named Dickinson, Sussex, Cummings, and Assisi have also been blocked.\" -- Read More

Gooooooogle Growing Up

SF Gate has a Story on Google that is quite interesting. The founders are 27 and now employ 120 people!

``Our goal is to build the ultimate search engine,\'\' said Larry Page, Google\'s chief executive and co-founder. ``We think that we can make search engines better every month, and I don\'t see that ending anytime soon.\'\' -- Read More

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