NZ Library Association critical of e-government policy

Ann Ryan sent in This Story on The New Zealand Library and Information Association. They have been pressuring the NZ Government to take a \"wider approach\" to promoting e-government and e-commerce for more than a year.
Now they are criticising the SSC\'s e-government policies and have set out a list of specific policy demands.
They want Government to appoint people from Lianza and the Maori Library Information Workers\' Association e-government advisory board.

\"There is a serious risk to our future and a possible failure to the Government\'s e-commerce and e-government initiatives if the environment for developing a knowledge society is not created soon.\"


A Day on the Job: Archivist

Someone writes \"Here\'s an interesting little story from CNN on an archivist in Alaska.\"

It\'s good to see some of the over looked parts of the LIS world get some attention. The story is on Kathleen Hertel, processing archivist in the Archives and Manuscripts Department of the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA).

Dirty-book guy

Bob Cox sent in this
on Martin Davis a man who has filed more tha a dozen
complaints on books in the Charlotte library. He actually
went so far as to filed a complaint with the police,
accusing the library of violating obscenity laws.

I was suprised at the length of this story, they actually
go into his life story.

Now after
reading Rory\'s story
on objectivity
, was this story objective and fair?

\"\"I\'m not trying to titillate anybody,\" he said. \"I\'m
making some people aware of things they don\'t know
about and I intend to keep doing that. The
commissioners should be acting on this . A crime has
been committed, and the commissioners are
accessories, and the library director should be


Lincoln Presidential Library

John writes
\"My hometown paper has this
about the new Lincoln Presidential Library in
Springfield, Il. The public library in town is also named
Lincoln Library after its favorite son. \"

Folks at Springfield\'s Lincoln Library are already
running into trouble with names. The Lincoln
Presidential Library and Museum isn\'t expected to be
done till late 2002, and already someone sent a
$50,ooo check to the wrong place.


Neutrality, Objectivity and the Political Center

I published a long editorial in Library Juice last week called Neutrality, Objectivity, and the Political Center, which explores and attempts to clarify the differences and relationships between these ideas. I realize that not everyone would agree with it, but I think it makes some important points out a few things that are seldom thought about by most librarians. I would appreciate your comments.


Prince Charlie\'s a Potter Fan

Write a controversial tale from the dark side, fill it with sorcery, witchcraft and wizardry and get the keys to the kingdom from the princely one himself [more...]


Harry Trailer Hits The Web

There is a three-minute trailer for the upcoming \"Harry Potter and the Sorcerer\'s Stone\" movie online now at, if you can get through. The movie comes out Nov. 16.

You can also find the trailer Here or here.


Happy Birthday Theodor Geisel!

The National Education Association (NEA) has designated today as \"Read Across America\" day.

There was a funny story on NPR this morning on the crazy things school principals are doing to get their kids to read. They are kissing Llamma\'s, snakes, and being duct taped to the wall, if the kids read enough books.


The Napster Public Library

The Chicago Tribune has this piece on the difference between Napster and the public library.
\"A library checks books out one at a time, and while one is reading the book, it is not available to others. It does not distribute thousands of copies at once.

A library does not let you keep the book. It sets terms and limits on how long you can keep it, and fines you if you are late in returning it.\"

Patent This!

ABA Network has a Story on all the stupid patents the the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has been issuing. 1-Click ordering is of course the most famous example. People like try to talk some sense, but it seems to fall on deaf ears.

\"Law professor Pamela Samuelson of the University of California, Berkeley, charges that the PTO \"simply can’t be competent in issuing [business-method] patents\" because of examiners’ insufficient training and \"woefully inadequate prior art\"—the legal term for previously published descriptions of a patented invention. \"Besides,\" she says, \"the Constitution was intended to allow patents for technology. And business methods aren’t that.\"


ACLU v. Copa v. Aschcroft

If you speak leagalease, Tim says there is a copy of the DOJ \"Petition for Writ of Certiorari\" that went to the Supreme Court
about going after the
the Child Online Protection Act (COPA). This
proceeding is now titled Ashcroft v. ACLU.
HTML Version and the PDF Version

The original on the case is here:Third Circuit\'s opinion.


Science and Technology Sources on the Internet

Mary Musgrave sent along This One from Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. The story covers databases that produce a list of citations to scientific literature.
It\'s a great list if you are are the hunt for good science info.


News Librarians At Work

News librarians have been a big part of computer-assisted journalism projects in news papers. This Story from a cool site is about how The News & Observer in NC came to undertake computer-assisted investigative reporting projects.

\". News research librarians, alert to their potential role in CAJ
are exploring techniques and resources beyond database journalism. While
most news librarians are not centrally involved in this area of
investigative reporting, they are keeping current with development by
attending workshops and seminars as well as by keeping up to date with the
growing literature on CAJ.\"


Literary gems languish in library

Bob Cox sent along This Story on the Wilmington Institute Free Library\'s basement.
They have issues of Time dating from 1924 and Scientific American from 1846 and a full 20-volume original set of The North American Indian. They just don\'t have the money to properly maintain the archives.

\"Attics and basements are the worst places to keep your materials,\" Dimunation said. \"When you have extended spikes in either temperature or humidity, it subjects the paper and bindings to expansion and contraction. Those are the extremes we try to avoid when we store books in a rare book vault.\"

Indie Book Sellers Are Back

Wired has an Audio Story that says Independent booksellers are regaining ground on the mega-retailers both in stores and online, with a stong and devoted following.


Bad Laws Down In Australia

So you thought the US was the only one passing stupid laws? (UCITA), well Here\'s A Story on one in Australia. This one may be even worse for libraries than the UCITA.

\"Libraries will have exemptions similar to the ones they already hold for distributing information but they will not be able to build up searchable collections, or provide material in competition with commercial providers.\"


The Web is a brain

Brian writes \"Transforming information retrieval on the Web: a new direction\" is a KM World article which discusses a couple models of Web organization and suggests an AI approach to information retrieval. The Web Version of the article doesn\'t include the print edition\'s diagrams, which could have been done better anyway.\"


Speling Eerorr

The web is full of spelling errors, and now there is a site that catches them. Human Spell Check is watching, so you better check, double check, and triple check your spelling.


Hold on to your E-Rate

In today\'s New York Times, Rebecca S. Weiner writes...

Advocates for the E-rate, a program that subsidizes Internet connections for the country\'s schools and libraries, are worried that President George W. Bush\'s proposal to consolidate federal education technology programs into a single block grant could stifle its success.


How Do You Motivate Your Staff

Linda Mbonambi writes:\"
I am researching on staff recognition to other insitutions. I want to find out how do they do it, and what kind of rewards do they give to their staff and what criteria do they use to recognise a staff member in a library setting. We as staff recognition team would like to apply some methods to our staff as a way of motivating them.\"

eMail her and let her know how you do it.



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