B Buzz Highlights -- Adobe, Glassbook, etc.

Hey, it\'s Wednesday, so it must be the midweek Studio B Buzz highlights. Strap in and stay tuned for Glassbook news, a study that shows Americans aren\'t likely to purchase e-books, and more... -- Read More

Got Trivia?

I am working on putting together a trizia quiz to be published on LISNews next week. If you have some interesting trivia to contribute to the 1st annual \"LISNews.com Librarian Trivia Contest\" please Email Me : blake@lisnews.com.

Be sure to check back next week for the exciting quiz, maybe you can win huge and exciting prizes. (Grand Prize will be less than $1.00us, so don\'t get too excited.)

I\'m rubber, you\'re glue ...

Brian writes \"In a Chicago Tribune article on the horrors of looking \"matronly,\" an image consultant is quoted as saying:

\"I don\'t think it requires an age ... it\'s an attitude. When people no longer have any sexual zing. It\'s the funky librarian look, Mumsy, skirts full, eyewear outdated, a missing sexual energy, an attachment to the past.\"

chicagotribune.com has the full Story\"

Urbanites are a funny bunch, so preocupied with what others think of them, now that I think about it, so are \"We\".

Leisure reading on the decline, say surveys

The Straits Times of Singapore reports that various sources show books may be losing out to videos. One factoid about the US says that \"in 1998, the number of videos rented each day was double the number of library books checked out.\" Well, sure -- it takes more than 90 minutes to read a book.

\"Research into reading habits in Japan shows children are reading fewer books each year. In the US, people are twice as likely to [rent] a video than borrow a book from the library.\"

Stereotypes of the Library Lady

Here is a cute article from the DesMoines Register about the old lady who said Shhh!! all the time.\"The thousands of books were well past their prime and so was the woman who ran the place. Miss Library Lady was about 99 years old, wore her hair in a tight gray bun and looked at you over the edge of her half-glasses. Her vocabulary amounted to little more than \"No talking\" and \"Be quiet\" and \"Shhhh.\" -- Read More

Future of the three children

The Free Lance Star has a follow-up story on the three children who were abandoned in a library.\"Three small children abandoned in a library a week ago by their mother will stay in foster care for now, despite their father’s plea for custody.\" -- Read More

Library in a cartoon museum?

Ben Ostrowsky writes:

The city of
Boca Raton,
Florida,
is considering
moving
their library

into the
International Museum of
Cartoon Art
.
It sounds cool, but the main reason offered is that it
would benefit the
failing museum. There\'s not enough parking and
there\'s not enough room,
but hey, anything to save a museum, right?

\"They told me in the beginning a long time ago that they
needed 70,000
square feet, and we don\'t have nearly enough,\"
[museum founder Mort
Walker] said, pointing out that the museum has 55,000
square feet.

Seattle\'s online services well received

Ben Ostrowsky Writes:

The
King County
Library System
in
Seattle has gotten some
great publicity in the
Seattle Times recently.

I can go to my local library and take out a wide range of
fiction and
nonfiction materials. But, when looking for information
on a specific
topic, the most useful books often reside at other
libraries, are checked
out or can\'t leave the building. Yet, if I search the
Internet at home, I
can usually find the information I need, instantly.

Well, maybe not all the information I need, or at least as
many
authoritative sources as I should have to be
well-informed. It turns out
the library has precious online resources that are
available only through
a library\'s Web site.

In-tents Librarians

R Hadden Writes:
The Wall Street Journal has an item on today\'s front
page (Tuesday,
August 29, 2000) in the \"Work Week\" column, about a
library.
\"Inspiration hit Charles \"Duke\" Oakley one day as he
cruised past a
Cirque du Soleil big top. Mr. Oakley, then facilities
director for the
University of California at Los Angeles, decided a tent
would make a fine
temporary library. So the school built a
36,000-square-foot vinyl fabric
affair, complete with aluminum skeleton, lights and fire
sprinklers....
UCLA\'s Mr. Oakley, now in private practice, ...misses
the temporary
library since it was taken down. \"It was a little festive,
and it was a
little unusual,\" he says.\"`

There is no indication of when this event
happened, nor any comments
from the library staff about library concerns such as
insect control or
humidity levels or potential for vandalism. -- Read More

@yourlibrary

ALA recently paid a PR firm a huge sum of money for a branding campaign, which was unveiled at the annual conference in July. Called \"@yourlibrary,\" the campaign gives libraries the opportunity to use the famous \"@\" sign to market their services. A television ad showing how exciting and electronic libraries really are was shown to conference goers at the opening session. ALA\'s announcement of the campaign is worth reading, as is a discussion about it on the ALA Council listserv, published in a recent Library Juice.

Searchonomics: Incentives for Infomediaries

Wherewithal founders Steve Thomas and Darrin Skinner have spent two years designing a powerful search technology which is scalable to the growth of the Internet. They believe they have overcome the fixed taxonomy problem that limits the usefulness of conventional web directories like Looksmart, ODP, and Yahoo. This
article at Traffick
takes an early look at this fledgling service.

Another fledgling directory using volunteer reviewers is Zeal. Zeal\'s volunteers gain points which can be exchanged for charitable donations. This is Traffick\'s review of Zeal: \"Volunteer Directory Seeks Zealots.\" -- Read More

Time Limited E-Textbooks

Slashdot had a very interesting post yesterday\"Vital Source Technologies is now providing time-limited medical textbooks to universities. Password protected books as predicted in The Right To Read by Richard Stallman are finally becoming a reality.\" Starting on Oct. 28, (when the other part of the DMCA comes into effect), you could face a civil lawsuit and criminal penalties of up to five years in jail and a fine of $500,000 for reading someone else\'s textbook. See the NYU FAQ, the Advogato discussion, or the company crowing about new revenue opportunities.

As always, the Comments on Slashdot are very interesting.

Literature and a Latte

Ever Helpful R. Hadden Writes:\"

A new public library in Howard County is borrowing a page
from the corporate booksellers\' manual: Give the customers
convenience, comfy furniture and cappuccino.

Read The Story in the Washington Post.

\"Even those who hate mega-bookstores can see their formula is working. People flock to the stores, where they can linger for hours, catch a poetry reading, browse racks of magazines and newspapers and fill up on latte and scones.\"

Dave Barry on Harry Potter

Ben Ostrowsky writes :Dave Barry had a funny piece on
Harry Potter
a few weeks ago.

\"
I am NOT jealous of the woman who writes the Harry Potter books. It does
NOT bother me that her most recent book, Harry Potter and the Enormous
Royalty Check
, has already become the best-selling book in world
history, beating out her previous book, Harry Potter Purchases
Microsoft
.

Amazonian Microserf E-Books

david writes \"mildly interesting. But B&N is ahead of amazon, i think...

Cnnfn.com has the full short Story

Software giant Microsoft Corp. and top online retailer Amazon.com Inc. on Monday said they are teaming up to sell digital books in the latest boost to the electronic alternative to paper and ink.

Amazon would use a customized version of Microsoft\'s Reader software for downloading and displaying digital text on a computer screen or handheld computer, the companies said.
\"

If it\'s for the children it must be good

Brian writes \"Often-clueless columnist Bob Greene of the Chicago Tribune is encouraging people to donate their used books to needy libraries in Chicago Public Schools. I have a feeling this will end badly, with the school system deluged with unusable crap.

Chicagotribune.com has the Story

\"

E-Books in Seybold Spotlight

Wired has a Story on The Seybold SF conference that covers all things publishing, including a big focus on Ebooks. The conference web site has a nifty
Digital Library that has some useful information on technology.

\"E-book vendors will take over 11,000 square feet on the show floor to showcase their technologies and security solutions.

Microsoft (MSFT) will demonstrate its recently announced Digital Asset Server, a digital rights management (DRM) solution, and Windows-based PC Reader. \" -- Read More

It is not just the books

Sometimes it\'s not just the selection of books that brings kids into the library. As this article from the Tampa Tribune explains, it may be the appearance of the library itself.\"But it wasn\'t the books that added the sparkle - it was the bright, welcoming lighting. And the shiny new shelves, the spotless circulation desk, the chairs with nary a pencil gouge nor wad of gum stuck underneath.\" -- Read More

Monday Studio B Buzz Highlights

Zzzzzzzz... Yo, it\'s Monday, and today\'s highlights include an expected increase in book sales, what the California energy crisis is doing to bookstores, and selling used books for fun and profit (mostly profit). Get thee the buzz! Or at least the highlights.... -- Read More

Progressive Librarians Guild

Progressive Librarians Guild, an affiliate organization of the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association, was formed in January 1990 by a group of librarians concerned with our profession\'s rapid drift into dubious alliances with business and the information industry, and into complacent acceptance of service to the political, economic and cultural status quo.


The development of public libraries was spurred by popular sentiment which held that real democracy requires an enlightened citizenry, and that society should provide all people with the means for free intellectual development. Current trends in librarianship assert that the library is merely a neutral mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society.


Members of PLG do not accept this notion of neutrality, and we strongly oppose the commodification of information. We will help to dissect the implications of these powerful trends, and fight their anti-democratic tendency. -- Read More

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