Anchorage Gay Pride Display Revisited

For The Anchorage Daily News, Tim Pryor writes...

\"The city\'s Library Advisory Board endorsed a new policy for library exhibits on Tuesday that its chairwoman called tighter and less ambiguous than the previous policy. But it doesn\'t address a suggestion by Anchorage Mayor George Wuerch. The board\'s new policy, which the library would use to review exhibits of materials from outside the library, says exhibitors should describe displays specifically. It also prevents the city from excluding exhibits for being promotional.\" more...


Clinton To Share Library Plans

For The Times Record, Elizabeth Caldwell writes...

\"Former President Clinton will speak Thursday at the Aerospace Education Center, where he will give his first major speech regarding his plans and vision for the Clinton Presidential Library and Center.\" Geez, um, I feel privileged, don\'t you all? I wonder if he\'ll include a collection of memoirs, including a grouping of portraits, entitled, \"To all the Girls I\'ve Loved Before...\" with Monica at the head. more...


San Diego Union-Tribune Chops Archive

sent along This Story on the San
Diego Union-Tribune blocking access to all of the
archive\'s contents created prior to Jan. 1, 2000 in
response To the \'Tasini\' Decision.

They cited the logistical nightmare of sorting through
thousands of electronically archived free-lance stories
dating back to 1983, limited economic gain, and a
class-action suit brought by the National Writers Union
(NWU) that includes the Union-Tribune as a defendant.


The Dusty Bookshelf

Sometimes ya find the Darndest things trolling around
your friends Sites.
Rory has put
together something he calls The Dusty
. It\'s a collection of ancient library
oriented articles from Library Journal and other places.
Most are from the very early 1900\'s and late 1800\'s and
cover some very interesting topics.
The Telegraph in The Library, The Library as a Social
Centre, and Remarks on the Art of Using a Library, are
just a few. His introduction:

\"To know where we\'re going (or decide where
we\'re going) it helps to take a look at the past. What has
changed and what has stayed the same? What is really
new and what is really old? What works? I compiled
this collection of fourteen out-of-copyright articles about
libraries and librarianship for LISSweb, the website for
the SJSU SLIS Student Organization (LISS). I think the
articles can help in the process of reflection on
librarianship, and are entertaining and thought
provoking as well.\"


Spiffy Librarian Duds

You may already have some cool Librarian Duds but The Laughing Librarian has some mighty spiffy new T-Shirt designs.

La Bibliothèque ... Oh-La-La!, Zen Librarian and Lucifer\'s Library.

So join in and Help him stay unemployed! If just 1,287 people a month buy t-shirts and other stuff he won\'t have to get a job!

Though a Job Offer might be even better...


Passing time till Harry has a Funny Little List of ways to make time disappear while you\'re waiting for the Nov. 16 release of the film Harry Potter and the Sorcerer\'s Stone.

\"Write an operations manual for the Nimbus 2000 and save Harry from the broomstick police! A British White Witches high priest in Sussex, England, told Reuters our boy wizard is riding his Nimbus backward in the trailer for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer\'s Stone.\"


Public access computer used to send nude photos to teen

This one isn\'t exactly the type of story I normally post, but it has some interesting details.

A 20-year-old man sat at a public access Internet computer above the West Side branch of the Grand Rapids Public Library and e-mailed nude photos of himself to a 14-year-old Cedar Springs girl.

On May 9, Mullin used a Media Center computer to create a \"Fans of John Mullin\" Yahoo Club site. The free home page contains an archive of photos and a profile of Mullin that lists his occupation as \"giving women foot massages for free.\"

Thanks to the great and powerful Bob Cox for this one.


Court denies request to dismiss Internet filter lawsuits

I think I may have posted this before, but James Nimmo passed along This Findlaw story on the lawsuits challenging the Children\'s Internet Protection Act that makes federal funding for library technology contingent upon Internet filtering will move forward to trial.

The Justice Department asked to have the lawsuits thrown out, but a two-paragraph order issued Thursday rejected the government\'s argument that the challengers had no valid First Amendment claim.


E-Book Security Spotlighted at BookTech West

The Dmitri Sklyarov debacle has made e-book copyright issues a focus of this year\'s BookTech West Expo:

\"For those who are convinced that e-books can never be properly encrypted and that publishers are about to deliver their intellectual property to a horde of maleficent pirates, the Adobe case proves that anything can be hacked,\" said Richard Nash, director of acquisitions for . . Copyright will be among the major topics of discussion at this book and technology publishing conference, which runs through Wednesday and is expected to draw more than 1,400 book-publishing professionals. (More from Wired.)


National Book Festival Announced for September

Someone from the Associated Press writes...

\"The first National Book Festival, sponsored by the Library of Congress, will be held Sept. 8, first lady Laura Bush said Monday. The event, whose hosts will include Mrs. Bush and Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, will be modeled after similar events she sponsored as first lady in Texas. \'I believe that every American should have the sense of adventure and satisfaction that comes from reading a good book -- and, I might add, a good newspaper article,\' she said.\" more... from NewsFlash.
Here\'s still more from CNN.


Questia to Let College buy Online Library Service in Bulk

For The Houston Chronicle, Tom Fowler writes...

\"Questia Media continues to adjust its marketing strategy this summer with a plan to offer universities the ability to buy subscriptions for its online library and research service in bulk. The bulk purchase is something of a departure for Questia, which in the past was emphatic that it would only sell its $19.95 per month service to individuals. According to Michael Bell, VP of Academic Affairs at Elmhurst College \"Keeping the library staff involved in the use of Questia is important since the service had a tendency to raise the hackles of librarians initially. Questia has been seen by some as a replacement for the library, but it can\'t do that. For us it serves as an answer to a very tough challenge of trying to meet a variety of needs with a limited budget.\" more...


Bush Should Make Libraries Big Part of Reading Reform

It\'s not uncommon knowledge that the reading skills of U.S. school kids lags behind. The tendency is usually to point the finger at a failing educational system, lazy parents, or alien life form, but President Bush says he\'s not going to do any of those. The President has proposed a $5 billion national literacy campaign to boost the reading level of kids to their appropriate grade level. more... from The Orlando Sentinel.

In an Age Where Criminals are Hardened, but Well Read...

The Library police in Texas are issuing arrest warrants for people who refuse to return overdue library books. Perpetrators get four chances, which seems pretty lenient considering there was a time when the norm was three strikes and you\'re out. Anyway, the maximum sentence - 6 months in the slammer and $2000. more... from Anorak.


Eudora Welty May Have Left Unpublished Work

From The Chicago Sun Times, Jason Straziuso writes...

\"Eudora Welty, who died last week at age 92, published no new fiction after 1973. But she spent years typing away, raising the tantalizing possibility that there is unpublished work sitting in her attic. Welty was one of the 20th century\'s most beloved authors and the first living writer to be given her own volume in the prestigious Library of America series. Any posthumous work would attract widespread interest.\" more...


Jail Time in the Digital Age

Copyright scholar (and Electronic Frontier Foundation board member) Lawrence Lessing neatly skewers the DMCA:

The D.M.C.A. outlaws technologies designed to circumvent other technologies that protect copyrighted material. It is law protecting software code protecting copyright. The trouble, however, is that technologies that protect copyrighted material are never as subtle as the law of copyright. Copyright law permits fair use of copyrighted material; technologies that protect copyrighted material need not. Copyright law protects for a limited time; technologies have no such limit. Thus when the D.M.C.A. protects technology that in turn protects copyrighted material, it often protects much more broadly than copyright law does. It makes criminal what copyright law would forgive. (More from the New York Times.)

A tip of the pen to Metafilter.


Ask Slashdot: Computer Books For A Library?

Who would\'ve ever though Slashdot would be a good Collection Development source?
Not me, but it turns out we were all wrong.

This Ask Slashdot story is from a fellow looking for recommendations on what computer books to buy for a library. As always the slashdot masses came through in spectacular fashion with many good ideas.
So if you are in need of some ideas for the library at home or work, check it out.

Big Magazines get Bigger

Carrie writes \" This New York Times Story New York Times Story describes how so many of the smaller magazines are being bought out by larger magazines. \"

Consolidation in the publishing industry continues...

Last week, Time Inc. bought the British company IPC Media P.L.C., and recently bought Business 2.0.

Primedia bought Emap USA, Earlier this year,
Advance Publications bought The Golf Digest Companies, and Gruner
& Jahr, a unit of Bertelsmann, closed deals for Inc. and Fast Company.

\"Everything is for sale now,\" Chip Block, the publishing strategist at
Ziff- Davis Publishing, said. \"You have a situation where people would
love to bail out if they can. A guy who last year wouldn\'t budge for
$200 million might look out there today and say, `Guess what? $80
million will suit me just fine.\' \"


U.S. Ties to Death Squads Accidently Leaked to Libraries

The Times reports that the U.S. Government Printing Office has mistakenly issued to libraries a report linking the U.S. to anti-Communist death squads in Indonesia:

The American Government is trying to claw back copies of a book that reveals US links to Sixties anti-communist death squads in Indonesia. Copies of the declassified history were prematurely distributed to libraries around the world. It contains details of how the US Embassy in Indonesia supplied names of members of the Communist PKI party which backed President Sukarno, the founding father of the republic, to the Indonesian security forces. Those forces massacred more than 100,000 people.(More)

The report can be found here. Thanks to New Breed Librarian.

Libraries are for socialist welfare scum

I was browsing around Google Groups, and I came across this rant, which concludes, "The simple truth is that Libraries are nothing more than an immoral and illegal form of welfare."

I\'m not sure whether this is genuine looney libertarian extremism, or a parody of same.


British Library closing Indian library

Matt Eberle
writes \"The British Council library in Patna, India is
closing. The library is reportedly being closed because
it has only 1,400 members. Members say this is
because the library has only 8,000 books and only 80
people can occupy the reading room at once.

Full Story

Membership (bclindia.o
) appears to be 400
Rupees annually \"


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