More on the Freeport Library Dilemma

There is clearly a rift between residents in Freeport, IL over funding a new library. The mayor of Freeport openly supports the building of a new library, while it seems a large number of residents are questioning the need. So far, it looks as though they might get about 1/2 of the original funding request, and possibly less if some residents get their way. The first part of the project to disappear would be the building\'s planned second story. Proponents of the new facility feel that the community needs to show support. The community has other ideas about how the money should be spent. [more...] from The Journal Standard.

Topic: 

20 Minutes of Reading a Day is a Great Place to Start

From The Ames, (NV) Tribune, Marlys Barker writes...

\"Reading and the local library were so much a part of my childhood that I can\'t imagine what my childhood would have been if I hadn\'t enjoyed reading or been able to read.\" [more...]

Topic: 

What We Have Is a Deteriorating Habit of Book Reading

Juan P. Dayang, President of the Publishers Association of the Philippines, Inc. and governor of the National Book Development Board, recently posed a challenge to the Filipano nation to increase a love of reading. With well over a 97% literacy rate, a high percentage of those people just don\'t want to read. \"Sadly, we say that we have today a deteriorating habit of book reading which has resulted in lesser quality of education ... The relevance of books and, of course, readership, could not perhaps be equated with anything else in the making of civilized societies. Books are the fundamental tools of man in acquiring new and wider experiences to enrich his existence.\" [more...] from Manila Bulletin.

Topic: 

Phone Subscribers Keep Schools, Libraries Wired

From Maine Today, Dan McGillvray writes...

\"New telephone subscriber surcharges that took effect July 1 will supply the necessary funds to keep Maine\'s libraries and schools connected to the Internet. For the past six years, those Internet Service Provider fees and associated local and toll telephone charges have been paid through a fund established by NYNEX after state regulators determined the utility\'s profits were too high in the mid-1990s.\" [more...]

Topic: 

Book Thief Pays Up - Gets Probation

A Gladstone, Missouri man found guilty of stealing some 58 books valued at about $800 has been forced to pay back $2,118 in damages and has been put on probation for one-year. He stole the books from a number of libraries and then attempted to sell them on E-Bay. Two online bidders contacted the library after purchasing the stolen books. More proof that crime doesn\'t pay, especially on E-Bay. [more...] from The Liberty Sun News.

A History of the National Library of Australia

The National Library of Australia is celebrating 100 years down under. They\'ve set up a Nifty Website [The Text Version is nice too], that details the full history.

No Worries Mate!

Tasini Round-Up

Three Tasini related stories that have most likely passed through LISNews in the past weeks, but you may have missed them, I apparently did, it\'s hard to keep up sometimes.


Freelancers Fear Blacklisting, a group of freelance writers are claiming that they are the next victims to be blacklisted.

Tasini Takes on The New York Times Again, Jonathan Tasini threatened another suit over what he sees as strong-arm tactics to subvert a ruling on freelancers\' rights.

Stop the Trash Trucks: A Tasini Case Damage-Control Proposal, considers an alternative that would protect the ultimate consumer as well as the future interests of all the creators and handlers of the material.

Topic: 

Citizens Force Town Council to Reject Library Funding by 11-3 Vote

Remember the people complaining about the proposed new Freeport, IL Public Library as reported earlier at LISNews Here -- And Here? The new library which would house a meeting room and a coffee shop? Well, the people obviously got through to the city\'s legislators. Funding for the new library was rejected in an 11-3 vote. According to the article, \"council members were swayed by phone calls, contacts opposed to funding.\" People want them to \"build it cheaper.\" Don\'t forget to read the comments by citizens at the bottom of the article. Read More Here. from The Journal Standard.
earlier stories: Everyone Can Contribute to Building a Library -- Library Criticized for Building Plans

Topic: 

E-Book Pirates Sunk?

Elcomsoft\'s Dmitri Sklyarov was arrested by U.S. federal agents in Las Vegas after his presentation at Defcon:

Dmitry Sklyarov, of Russian software company ElcomSoft, and author of Advanced eBook Processor, which removes restrictions on reading and printing from encrypted PDF files, was arrested for alleged violations of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. According to an item on ElcomSoft\'s site, Sklyarov is being held a Las Vegas prison pending judgement on a motion filled by Adobe in California. Adobe has objected to the publication of the software and a presentation, entitled \"eBook Security: Theory and Practice\", that Sklyarov made at Defcon, the annual hacker\'s convention in Las Vegas.

[More from The Register. See \"Russian E-Book Pirates Still Afloat\" for even more on Elcomsoft.]

Wanted: One Library Please

The Town of Holliday, Texas has no library. If it\'s up to one resident, Deborah Miller, they will soon be on their way to having their own Public library. Miller has accumulated 3,500 books in her home and is trying to gain support from local people to put forth the funding and the effort to build a real library. Read More from The Times Record News.

Topic: 

State Issues 2,700 Title Book List for Student Reading

For The San Francisco Chronicle, Nannette Asimov writes...

\"Once upon a time, a dozen years ago, California\'s leading educators declared that students would do well to read certain books. A list was prepared, but it languished and was soon forgotten. Then along came education standards -- new levels of excellence that students were supposed to meet -- and new money for school libraries, $158.5 million per year. Today, a new list of 2,700 books recommended by state educators appears on the Web, searchable by title, author, awards garnered and even cultural specificity. Click on the title, and a summary appears. The result is an easy-to-use guide for school librarians, teachers, parents and students looking for good books.\"
[more...]

Topic: 

Your Book Delivered in 12-Minutes or Less

From Wired News MJ Rose writes...

\"Shortly before midnight on July 9, Jeff Marsh of Marsh Technologies and Peter Zelchenko of VolumeOne placed an order on the Internet for what would be the first print-on-demand book ever to emerge from a fully automated vending machine. Twelve minutes later, the book slid out of a chute on the prototype MTI PerfectBook-080 in Marsh\'s office in Chesterfield, Missouri. The book was Robin Shamburg\'s novel, Mistress Ruby Ties It Together, which explores the bizarre world of sadomasochism. Marsh said it might seem like an odd choice for such a momentous event, \"but maybe it\'s appropriate. After all, we\'ve been on our knees and chained to our machines for the past several weeks,\" he said. My question is this: You want fries with that? [more...]

Topic: 

Napster Given Deadline to File with Appeals Court

A Federal Appeals Court has given Napster until August 9 to file an emergency appeal which will allow them to come back online. They\'ve been offline since July 2. [more...] from The Nando Times.

Children\'s Privacy in an Online Jungle

For Web Techniques, Robert Cannon writes...

\"By and large, when it comes to protecting consumer privacy, the mantra in Washington has been self-regulation. Privacy gaffes by online companies are characterized as merely the normal growing pains of the new online economy. In addressing them, government has generally opted to negotiate resolutions with industry and consumer groups, rather than apply new regulations. As with many issues, however, when it comes to children, industry blunders have swiftly been greeted by the sound of the gavel coming down.\" [more...]

Search Engine Payola!

Ralph Nader\'s Commercial Alert has accused Hotbot and other search engines of ordering query results based on fees paid to them:


COMMERCIAL ALERT, a 3-year-old group founded by consumer activist Ralph Nader, asked the FTC to investigate whether eight of the Web’s largest search engines are violating federal laws against deceptive advertising. The group said that the search engines are abandoning objective formulas to determine the order of their listed results, and selling the top spots to the highest bidders without making adequate disclosures to Web surfers. . . The complaint touches a hot-button issue affecting tens of millions of people who submit search queries each day. With more than 2 billion pages and more than 14 billion hyperlinks on the Web, search requests rank as the second most popular online activity after e-mail. [More from MSNBC].

Thanks again to the invaluable geeks at Slashdot :)

Overdue Books? Libraries Want Them Back

For The Charleston, (WV) Daily Mail, Dan Forinash writes...

\"In one episode of \"Seinfeld,\" an investigator tracks down Jerry Seinfeld for having a long overdue library book.

In Grafton, WV reality is mirroring television, but for residents with outstanding library books, reality might not be as funny. Fines, enticements, even police arrests used to gain return of overdue books.\" [more...]

Topic: 

World Wrestling Federation Kicks off National Reading Initiative

Hey, whatever it takes.
Here\'s More.

Topic: 

Now the Puzzled Here Can E-mail a Librarian

The public library in Rochester, NY has joined the E-Reference wave with their Ask a Librarian service. According to Larra Clark, spokeswoman for the ALA, \"More and more people are seeing the benefit of using a librarian because they are the experts in managing and disseminating information. We like to call librarians the ultimate search engines.\" [more...] from Rochester News.com

Subduing the Paper Chase ?

Federal Computer Week reports on the National Archives\' antiquated and ineffectual National Personnel Records Center:

Requests for veterans’ records pour in to the National Personnel Records Center at a rate of 6,000 a day. But the records center, a massive warehouse in St. Louis, is ill-equipped to handle the demand. In an age when agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration can share electronic records almost instantly, the National Personnel Records Center still operates much as it did when it opened in 1955. . . On average, it takes workers at the records center 54 days to respond to written requests for records. But sometimes it takes years.

A Bibliomaniac Who Thought There was No Such Thing as a Bad Book

For The Mercury News, Dennis Knight writes...

\"Terence Crowley, taught library science with passion. One of his favorite teaching methods in the Library and Information Science Department at San Jose State University was to give students a word to research and watch them come back with the reams of information they had purveyed.\" [more...]

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS Subscribe to LISNews: - All comments