Gone without a sound

Story from North Dakota that ends the trouble they were having with the library director in Fargo. He quit, but they gave hime quite the golden parachute – $62,244 – including health insurance and retirement benefits, plus $10,000 in attorney fees and $6,000 in relocation expenses.

\"“It’s with regret that a qualified librarian and a good man’s reputation has been damaged here, but it’s important for us to grow and move on as a board.” said Library Board President Virginia Dambach.

The comment drew a few quiet, sarcastic remarks from some people attending the meeting, many of whom were past and present employees of the library.

Now they are thinking the next director should Not be a librarian. -- Read More

Filters, Filters and more Filters

The Courier Press has this article on whether libraries should put filters on their computers.\"When he’d finished the page, he clicked one of the photographs to go to the next link. It took him to a site where a beautiful woman wearing nary a stitch of fabric stood looking coyly into the camera. The photo loaded from the top down, and the boy’s eyes got bigger and bigger until he pushed his chair back and dashed from the computer laboratory. He explained later that he wasn’t sure he should see such a thing.\" -- Read More

I Will Get You My Pretties

The Associated Press has this story about parents who would not let a school give out certificates that said Hogwarts\' Certificate of Accomplishment because it exposed them to witchcraft. It seems that they don\'t care that they expose their children to censorship, free speech violations, and stupidity.\"The certificate, meant to encourage children to read, honored its recipient for completing a term at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, the school young Harry attends. The books feature Harry fighting against the forces of evil, aided by spells, flying brooms and magical instruments.\" -- Read More

Web filters in the limelight

The Orange County Register has an interesting Story on filtering. The story is interesting due to the lack of librarian quotes. Supervisor Todd Spitzer wants to let parents know about Orange County\'s program, \"Cyber Safely - Filter Out the Filth,\" so he is holding a news conferencetoday to trumpet it. Spitzer said the county is committed to defending the filtering policy in court, should anyone fight it by arguing First Amendment rights.

But, said Adams, \"We have had literally zero complaints.\'\'

Scheduled speakers at the news conference include Adams, Sheriff Mike Carona, District Attorney Tony Rackauckas and Shirley Goins, a representative of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.


So where are the librarians in all of this?

Harry Potter: He\'s Everywhere!

Wired has a Story on the Harry Hype, but they also cover how good Harry has been for Libraries. More than 350,000 people preordered book 4, there\'s the upcoming Hollywood blockbuster and Harry video games, official websites in both the U.S. and in Britain, and there are scads of others sites, both for and against.

\"When people felt kids were only involved with video games, it\'s heartening to see a book so well received,\" said Neal Coonerty, president of the American Booksellers Association, a trade group for independent bookstores. -- Read More

Distance Learning Goes Niche

The NYTimes has a Story that talks about the growth of Distance Learning at colleges and universities in the US. 44 percent of all higher education institutions offered distance learning courses in the 1997-1998 academic year and 79 percent of traditional four-year public universities were offering some form of distance learning during the 1997-1998 academic year.

It\'s all about the profits.....

Finding Information on the Internet

Finding Information on the Internet from the University of California, Berkeley, is a great tutorial someone recommended for a quick link. This is one of the best (If not THE best) tutorials on the web for this topic. They cover evaluation, search stratagies, Detailed instructions for the best search engines, and the 5 options for finding information on the web.

E-books with teeth!

R Hadden Writes:

The Wall Street Journal has a story today about a new idea in
electronic publishing- renting e-books and textbooks. A new dental textbook
at the New York University is available on a DVD. The students pay an
annual fee to keep the books updated, and there are strict controls on
downloading the information. At graduation time, the book erases itself
unless additional subscription funds are paid to the publisher, Called
VitalBook DVD, this systems incorporates a method of storing textbooks,
class notes, video and other media on a DVD. The cost to dental students at
NYU is about $5,000.00 for all four years of school.

See: Thomas E. Weber. \"Protecting Copyrights: How E-Books will be Like
Parking Meters.\" Wall Street Journal, Sept. 11, 2000, page B1.v

You\'ve Been Aggregated!

Speaking of linking lawsuits and the like, I\'ve been focusing on the general phenomenon of content aggregators this week. My take is that history smiles on the aggregator even if courts don\'t in the short term.

I\'ve cobbled together some recent news links with some of my own commentary in this week\'s Traffick Weekly. -- Read More

Open Publishing: The Net and the E-book

Slashdot has a great Story By Jon Katz on E Publishing. He says the net is bringing down publishers and they need to wake up to all the issues the web brings.

\"An e-book can be a viable alternative in some cases, though -- some e-books might even make money.The real significance of Napster appears completely lost on publishing executives, however. File-sharing is what the Net was made for, but is it really what publishers want: readers passing their e-books around for free on file-sharing sites? Probably not. But by taking a middle way -- in which publishers give consumers a say in titles, book purchases and pricing -- they\'d end up publishing a lot more writers like Eggers and ultimately sell a lot more books. Don\'t hold your breath.

Assessing Linking Liability

The NY Times has a Story
on the latest linking lawsuits making their way through the
courts here in the US.

\"

According to Judge Lewis A. Kaplan of the U.S. District
Court for the Southern District, in Manhattan, a link can be
bad or good. It mainly turns on whether the linker\'s intent
is laudable or not.\" -- Read More

The Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

The
Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

is a look back at how things were a couple hundred years ago
at The Smithsonian. It\'s full of cool old photos and info
for all you history buffs.

The WTO and Libraries

This is going in the international category, but it could actually affect us here at home.


Despite the protests in Seattle, most people still don\'t know what the WTO is or what it is doing. Far from working for free trade, the WTO primarily works for the deregulation and privatization of economic activity on a global scale. Already, hundreds of US laws have been overriden by WTO rules. As you may have heard, these are laws protecting health, the environment, and labor rights. But did you know that cultural services, like eduction and libraries, are also covered by WTO rules? It can be considered a \"trade barrier\" for a community to provide publically funded library service where an international company tries to offer a competing service on a for-profit basis (for example, electronic \"library\" services like e-books).


There was a program at this summer\'s ALA conference discussing the implications of the WTO for libraries. American Libraries gave it a brief writeup, with the facetious title, Are Libraries a barrier to free trade?


IFLA came out with a strong statement against these WTO rules before the Seattle meeting. The Canadian Library Association also released a strong anti-WTO statement. After the meeting, ALA followed suit, alerted by the Social Responsibilities Round Table.


Read on for the resolution approved by ALA Council. -- Read More

Time Running Out for Key High-Tech Legislation

One of my favorite mags Business 2.0 has a special report on the major internet/techie laws that are pending in the U.S.


With the Internet being such a big part of the library now, this legislation could impact the LIS world in a big way.

Ten Graces for New Librarians

Originally the Commencement address
at the School of Information Science and Policy,
SUNY/Albany on Sunday, May 19, 1996, GraceAnne
DeCandido has written \"Ten Graces for New Librarians\" a very
informative guide for all new librarians. Read it
love it, live it! -- Read More

GASB 34

I am seeking information on how libaries and their parent municipalities are, or will be, dealing with the new audit requirements that will soon be required as a part of GASB 34.


For more information see:
http://www.sco.state.id.us/web/dsaweb.nsf/pages/gasb34.htm

GASB 34 will be implemented for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2001 (for large entities), with a three-year phase-in of the standard for all government jurisidictions. Most observers are describing it as the most monumental change in government financial reporting in American history. The common wisdom is that failure to follow the guidelines set by the Government Accounting Standards Board will cost communities dearly when their bonds are rated.

Traditionally, state and local governmental agencies have used cash accounting methods to report infrastructure assets like roads, bridges, water and sewer facilities and, of course libraries. With cash accounting,the capital cost of an infrastructure investment appears in an agency’s annual financial report during the year in which the cost of construction is incurred. The value of existing physical assets do not appear on financial reports. -- Read More

Cyborgs, catalogs et. al.

There attempts to catalog the net using the Dublin Core and the Warwick Framework. (References below). The catalogers worry that search engines that can’t possibly keep up with fast growing and chaotic web resources are indexing the net.. They seek semantic interoperability -tell me that\'s not an eight-bit concept!

They worry that on the web there is no controlled vocabulary such as one finds in cataloging rules. The word means one thing to an engineer, quite another thing to a orthodontist, still another to a card player. A rose by any other name may smell as sweet but a bridge by the same name should smell different to a proper search engine. Search engines will never catch the nuances without the help of catalogers for the web. Enter the Dublin Core, the OCLC CORC project and the Warwick framework, to try to catch, rather than reap, the whirlwind. -- Read More

XML in Libraries

I stumbled on \"The XML Files: The Truth Will Be Out There\" a
paper written by Cara Bradley on how XML will be
used in libraries. She covers A Brief History of Markup
Languages, and XMl in libraries. It\'s worth the read if
you\'re a geek like me.

\"XML looms on the
horizon but the truth about the role it will play in digital
representation is not yet known, and its potential impact
on library and information environments remains just
that, potential. Yet, the relationship between XML and
these information climates seems promising; as Exner
and Turner note, \"XML is certainly a significant advance
in the handling of data and information in the Web
environment, and anything that affects information will
also impact the library field\" (\"Examining XML\").
Librarians are well-advised to be aware of
technological developments that may have a profound
impact on the way they manage and deliver information.
XML is one such technology deserving of attention. \"

Report from US Librarians in Cuba

In March of this year, seventeen U.S. librarians, scholars and educators
participated in an 11-day educational tour of libraries, archives,
universities, and cultural and historical sites in Cuba. Organized by
Rhonda Neugebauer, the delegation traveled to five cities and held
discussions with Cuban librarians and informational professionals about
their work, philosophy, values, their perceptions of their role in society
and their obligation to provide access and delivery of information to their
patrons.

Here are the reports from Rhonda Neugebauer and Larry Oberg in a supplement to this week\'s Library Juice

Library debate centers on access to pornography

MessengerNews.net has a well balanced Story on filtering. This sums up the battle on filtering going on in many American public libraries very well. Nothing earth shattering in this one, just nice for not taking a side.

\"Since the remodeled library opened in November 1998, staff have only caught children looking at pornography twice.

\"I don\'t think two incidents ... is a serious problem,\" Cynthia Weiss, director of the Kendall Young Library, said .

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