Pennsylvania Libraries Improving

A Heart Warming
Story
from PA on how well the libaries are doing.
It\'s nice to see good news for a change.

\"Since 1999, the Ridge administration has more
than doubled state aid for libraries, to $62 million a
year. It has earmarked another $12 million for
computers, software and online resources for libraries.
State officials are rewriting Pennsylvania\'s 39-year-old
library code - the legal document governing public
libraries - to improve operations and reward local
governments that increase funding for their
libraries.\"

The Internet Archive

Bob Cox sen this in:Consider the plight of a
traditional librarian trying to
deal with the
Internet. Providing organized access to something as
volatile, dynamic, and
disorganized as the Internet is truly what they call in
business \'an
opportunity\'. Founded in 1996 as a public nonprofit and
located in the
Presidio of San Francisco, the Internet Archive is
tackling that
\'opportunity\' by taking snapshots of Internet sites at
various time
periods, in essence preserving the place as it was, and
making the
resulting archive available for scholars and
researchers. To gain
access to it, you must register and describe either a
project that requires
you to get your grubby virtual paws on the material or a
plan to deposit
material. As of March 2000, the Archive had 1billion
Web pages, 50,000 FTP
sites, and 16 million Usenet postings amounting to
well over 14 terabytes
of data. The site describes the challenges of
preserving digital
materials, how the snapshots (really Web crawls) are
taken, the limitations
to such automated processes, what plans for the future
are, and just why
digital libraries are important:
Archive.org


From: http://www.netsurf.com/nse/nse.02.08.html#SS4

Show Being Retooled

Dr. Laura Schlessinger\'s new television show is ailing.


The \"Dr. Laura\" syndicated talk show has drawn low ratings and protests from gay activists, and now production has been stopped for a week, officials said.


Show spokeswoman Linda Lipman said the move was part of a pre-planned hiatus. But it is surprising because the show premiered only last week.


The break will give Paramount a chance to retool the daytime show, according to Friday\'s Los Angeles Times and the New York Post.


From AP

World\'s Largest Library ?

Feedmag has an Interview with Brewster Kahle the founder of Alexa who has built what they claim is the largest library in the world. They have collected thirty terabytes of data, archiving both the web itself, and the patterns of traffic flowing through it on their servers. It\'s interesting to what he considers a library, and how much it costs to catalog a book (hint:he says that\'s a bad thing)

\"In just three years we got bigger than the Library of Congress, the biggest library on the planet,\" he says, arms outstretched, smiling. \"So the question is: What do we do now?\" -- Read More

Plant Getting Pulled

A suggested Story from Salon.com on \"The Plant\". The latest numbers showed that just under 70 percent of those downloading \"The Plant\" paid for it. Mr. King has set 75 percent as the minimum for him to continue after part three, which will be available on his Web site Monday. Pay up!

Old World Thinking Pulls Brave new World

Someone sent in this Story from Salon on a complaint from a parent that prompted school officials to pull Aldous Huxley\'s novel \"Brave New World\" from library shelves in Alabama. \"Brave New World\" ranks 54th on the ALA\'s list of the top 100 books drawing complaints during the 1990s.

\"Kathleen Stone of Elberta filed the complaint in letters to the school and Gov. Don Siegelman. She said Wednesday the novel\'s references to orgies, self-flogging, suicide and the characters\' contempt for religion, marriage and family do not make it a good choice for high school students.

\"When you\'re a college student, it\'s one thing, but I don\'t think too much of assigning this to high school students,\" Stone said.

Friday Updates

Friday updates for this week include antique newspaper dispute, Fool\'s Gold, Book banning is bad, Library Opera, digital revolution, e-books, and much, much, more. Enjoy!! -- Read More

B Buzz Highlights -- Paper Books, Market Future

Ready for the weekend? Before you shut down the computer check out the Studio B
Buzz
highlights. A study predicts a strong book
publishing future but a survey shows that Internet users
prefer the paper kind.... -- Read More

Pedal to work, get bike stolen

Brian writes \"Despite the mayor\'s enthusiasm for
bicycles-as-transportation, Chicago Public Library still
has no secure bike parking for employees. Chicago
Tribune
columnist Eric Zorn has the Story.
\"


He suggests, in part:

\"Put a cage around one of
those indoor parking spaces now used by an
environmentally unfriendly, traffic-thickening car and
make it a bike locker for employees; shove supplies
aside somewhere in the bowels of the building and
designate a bike parking area; or let employees park
their bikes near their work spaces.\"

The end of the internet?

Bob Cox sent in This Story from The BBC. Talks
about Journalist Alan Travis,who wrotea history of
censorship in the UK, \"Bound and Gagged, A Secret
History of Obscenity in Britain \". He seems to think
the internet will come under increasingly restrictive
laws.

\"Unfortunately, I think the great libertarian days
of cyberspace, whereby you can have a very powerful
medium beamed into every home which won\'t in some
way be limited in terms of what material comes
through, is over.\" -- Read More

Children\'s Privacy in the Library

Pam Force wrote a fantastic in-depth look at childrens privacy concerns in the library.


How do we define privacy? And what are the problems behind the complex issue of children\'s privacy in the library? Privacy can be defined as the ability to control information about one\'s self. Respecting the privacy of others is tantamount to accepting others as members of the human race. Once gaining privacy was as simple as closing the curtains, but no longer. The internet has made the issue of privacy a very personal one for every individual, not just those who use it. -- Read More

Foil the Filters Contest

The Digital Freedom Network is running a contest to show how inadequate censoring software can be.

\"The purpose of the contest is to have a little more fun with something whose greatest accomplishment is as an object of ridicule. It\'s the Corvair of programming,\" said DFN Internet Development Director Alan Brown of censorware.

Full details are here

Gay Books Banned in Canadian School

The \'Gay Book\' stories continue. Someone [sorry I lost the name] sent in this Story I managed to find at Canada.com. The school trustees of a Vancouver suburb had the right to bar three books about same sex couples from kindergarten and first grade classrooms.

\"No society can be said to be truly free where only those whose morals are uninfluenced by religion are entitled to participate in deliberations related to moral issues of education in public schools...\"

Again, no word on how many children got gayed after reading the books. -- Read More

Gay Books Stay In Texas Library

Mary Musgrave was the first one to send in The Story from TRNOnline. A federal judge struck down Wichita Falls, TX \"gay books\" library resolution saying the controversial rule was unconstitutional. The case stems from a two-year controversy over \"Heather Has Two Mommies\" and \"Daddy\'s Roommate\". They has set up a petition system to allow library patrons to ask the library to move children\'s books to other sections of the library.
It required the signatures of 300 card holders who were 18 or older and had lived in Wichita Falls for at least six months. No word on how many children turned gay from the books. -- Read More

Free to read Harry, eh?

CNN has a Story on a victory for Harry
Potter in Canada. The Durham Region School Board,
near Toronto, had required parents to sign a consent
form before allowing the books to be read.


\"It\'s not the normal way we do business,\" said Doug
Ross, chairman of the board, on Tuesday. \"If their only
intention is to see the books banned then they\'ll never
be happy, because were not in the business of banning
books or censoring material.\"

No word on how
many students were turned into witches.

Top 10 most frequently challenged books

CNN is one of
many fine places to Read about The ALA\'s
list of most challenged books. They have a nice little
\"interactive\" section that tells about why each book has
been challenged.

Don\'t forget Banned Books Week
runs Sept. 23-30. Ban a book a day to celebrate! -- Read More

Rating the E-rate

Education Week has a nice Story on how the E-rate is working for us folks in the US. The say the program earns praise for overall effort, but lower marks for implementation.

\"The main theme I hear from educators and librarians is that this program has made possible the use of technology that otherwise would have been years away in classrooms,\" says Kate L. Moore, the president of the Schools and Libraries Division of the Washington-based Universal Service Administrative Co., or USAC, the nonprofit agency that manages the program for the Federal Communications Commission. \"It is allowing these organizations to leapfrog into the realm of advanced technology and learning.\" -- Read More

New E-Books Announced by RCA

There\'s a new e-book coming to town, and it\'s brought to you by RCA... -- Read More

Anti-Censorship

Lee Hadden Writes:

Scientific American announces a new publishing program in the October
2000 issue, pages 34-36, in the \"Technology & Business\" section. A new
program that allows a user to post an item to the World Wide Web that
cannot be altered or erased was announced in mid-August. Called \"Publius\",
it permits an author to place a file on the web that cannot be tampered
with or removed by censors or even government officials. It will be nearly
impossible to remove illegal materials from the web.

The program can be combined with anonymous hosts to obscure the names
of the file owner, and thus the file could truly be speech without
accountability.

Student Newspapers and Censorship

Lee Hadden Writes:

An article in the Washington Post shows that many high school students
who have articles censored in their student newspapers, are then posting
their items on the internet from their home computer. This avoids the
regulations that schools place on budding reporters, but has its own
problems as well. Many parents and teachers remember the diatribes posted
by the students from Columbine HS school shortly before their shooting
rampage. Also, problems of teen angst, accountability and slander remain.

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