Dictionary Publishers Going Digital

The NY Times has a Story on plans from Houghton Mifflin, Merriam-Webster and Microsoft, and Oxford University Press (The OED Folks) to sell electronic versions of their dictionaries, in one form or another.

\"Stifled for years by low margins and flat sales, publishers are salivating over digital licensing as a new source of revenue growth and promoting new features like audible pronunciations. But word scholars worry that the new pressures of the online market may end up favoring well-connected or well-positioned dictionaries -- some sniffingly cite Microsoft\'s Encarta -- over more authoritative lexicons. \" -- Read More

Bibliotherapy in England

Studio B Buzz suggested this One from CNN on \"Bibliotherapy\". It hasn\'t caught on in The States yet, but I bet people in California have something like this, don\'t they?


\"So where can you -- the average depressed, stressed-out, anxiety-ridden American -- find a good bibliotherapist in this country? Sorry, but you probably won\'t find one at all. Officials at the American Library Association (ALA) say that librarians in the United States aren\'t accustomed to handing out prescriptions for literary medicine. \" -- Read More

Something new at the library

The King County Library System in Washington is trying something new to attract youngsters. Multicolored library cards. The article appeared in the East Side Journal.
``I don\'t know of any library in the country that has tried anything like this,\'\' said Bill Ptacek, director of the King County Library System. ``The idea is for people to individualize how they access the library. We are the `People\'s University,\' and many things to many people.\'\' -- Read More

Library backs off Web filtering

The Nashua, NH Public Library has dropped a policy that forced people browsing the Internet on library computers to use Filters. The Filters were dropped due to threats to sue the library last month. The suit said the policy interfered with rights of adults to view any material they wish.

\'\'It\'s pretty cut and dry,\'\' said Arthur Barrett. \'\'Our chance of winning a lawsuit was probably slim to none.\'\'

Full Story at Boston.com -- Read More

Harry Giveaway

K. B. Shaw writes:\"
On Friday, December 1st, SPECTRUM Home & School Magazine will be giving away a BRITISH FIRST EDITION copy of \"Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire\", signed by J.K. Rowlings on July 8th at the Severn Valley Railway, Kidderminster, as part of the UK \"Hogwarts Express Tour.\" This is an unique opportunity to own this extremely scarce, highly desirable and collectable edition of Joanne Rowling\'s classic to give as a treasured Holiday gift or to keep for your own collection. Entries are free. Go to http://www.incwell.com/LanguageArts.html for details.\"

The Shape of the 21st Century Library

The Shape of the 21st Century Library, by Howard Besser, a LIS professor at UCLA, was a chapter in Information Imagineering: Meeting at the Interface, published by ALA. This paper discusses the rapid evolution of libraries and stresses the importance of librarians\' active, intelligent intervention in the changes that are taking place if librarianship\'s core missions and values are to be preserved. Changes in other institutions, technology trends, disintermediation, and the mission of public libraries are discussed. I think this paper makes a good statement and could be a good discussion piece for the LISNews community... An excerpt here: -- Read More

MPs lose their library cards

News.Com.Au has a Story on some troubles in The Parliamentary Library.

\"THE independence of parliamentarians has been undermined after a ruling that gives ministers the power to force MPs to pass requests for information through ministerial offices.
Ministers can now force Parliamentary Library researchers to go through their offices, so that ministerial staff will know what information is being sought by the MPs and can regulate the speed of the response.\"

Forgive me for being a stupid American, but, what\'s an MP?

Friday Updates

Friday updates for this week include volumes of fun, computer source code issues, Ralph Nader, A bot more napster, librarians efforts recalled, readers make friends with books, the bible, and the Quote of the Week!! -- Read More

More E-Book Quickies

I collected quite a little collection of E-Book stories this week. They include an interesting one on Joseph Lieberman’s book, \"In Praise of Public Life\".
Welcome to the future! -- Read More

African-American Research Library

The Denver Post has a Story on plans for a new library in Denver that will house a growing collection of documents related to African-Americans in CO.

\"We focused really hard on getting African-American political people first,\" Nelson said. \"But community people are very important also. Just the everyday folks, because they have the real nuts and bolts of things. We know the high-visibility people have done a lot. But the community people are very important to us too.\"

Letters to the Editor

It seems like there were many people upset about that article that ran in the New York Times last week. Read the letters to the editor here.
My letter wasn\'t published, but for those who care to read it, read on... -- Read More

Library to hunt down slackers, scofflaws

Another library is turning to a collection agency to get back some overdues. The Springfield-Greene County Library is trying a collection agency. The City Council is also considering a bill that toughens a city law by holding library-card holders legally responsible for materials checked out.

\"We’re out to get the chronic abusers who do not return our material, and there are chronic abusers,” library Executive Director Annie Busch said.

The library currently mails about 113 notices each week to those at least 55 days overdue, Busch said.\"

The Springfieldnews-leader has the full Story

Ohio strike Update

Someone sent in these two stories on the strike in Ohio. Things are getting worse.


15 strikers taken to jail after blocking doors


Postal Service fires worker for protest outside library


\"The Stark County
District Library was not quiet
Wednesday, and the librarians
themselves were creating the
clamor. -- Read More

Free-lancers sue database companies

Ron Force writes \"The San Francisco Chronicle has astory about free-lance authors suing Northern Lights, Gale Group, and ProQuest for payment of royalities on full text articles sold by publishers without permission. A similar group in New York has used the above, plus Reed-Elsevier. UnCover settled with the authors for $7.5 milion in back royalities. \"

Special Librarians\' Salaries

R. Lee Hadden writes \"bizjournals.com
In its 1999 salary survey, the 14,000-member
Special Libraries Association found that
member salaries had grown 5.1 percent in the
previous year, as compared to a 3.3 percent
increase for other white-collar workers in
roughly the same period. The average full-time
information professional was earning $52,826 a
year as of last spring.

\"

Teens’ library needs

Teens want comfy chairs, a place to chat, snacks and plenty of Internet access according to a survey in MT. The Story from the Billings Gazette reports on the not so suprising findings of the survey.

\"Brett Janecek, a 14-year-old freshman at Billings Central, envisions a teen center at the public library where he could “get away, relax and sit, and chill.”


And really, isn\'t it all about chillin\'? -- Read More

Intellectual Property Is an Oxymoron

We just don\'t have enough intellectual property stories.Here\'s One from Fool.com on how the Web has killed IP.

\"Technology is forcing us to re-evaluate the legal notion of intellectual property. The original compromise struck for the good of society has become unbalanced, and the reactions from the situation\'s current beneficiaries to counter this unrest have only disturbed the situation more. Copyright as it now stands has outlived its original purpose, and is no longer clearly beneficial to society as a whole. New business models must emerge, and are already emerging, to replace the old. \" -- Read More

The Height-Shelving Threat to the Nation\'s Libraries

Here\'s a rather unusual story on the Librarian of Congress James Billington, and his plans to shelve books by height. The author\'s name on this is Thomas Mann, though I didn\'t do any checking to enuse it is real, so take it with a grain of salt, unless you know otherwise. It still is rather interesting.

\"Librarian of Congress James Billington is moving towards shelving books at the Library of Congress by height rather than by subject. Such a move by LC would directly undercut the ability of scholars everywhere to search book collections below the superficial levels of access provided by computerized catalog records, because any example set by the national library is likely to be imitated by others.\" -- Read More

Information Architecture - A New Reason to Index

I found a neat story written by By Karen Spern and Leigh Bahnatka on Indexing web pages and Information Architecture.The Article Does a great job in explaining why indexing is important on the Web, especially for Information Architects.

\"Information Architects now consider content as important as design. Visual design is in decline, as consumers are demanding original content and faster download times. Site maps can’t provide access to textual information, so web indexes will become standard on web sites. \"

Very cool stuff, for those interested in the field.

Death of a Censor

Super Helpful R Hadden Writes :
Today during all the hype about Internet filters, we forget that not
to long ago people were paid by the state with tax money to censor and
filter for us. These people had the right to determine what other people
could or couldn\'t see. Their censorship decisions were backed up by force
of law and police powers of arrest and imprisonment for opposing those
decisions.
Mary Avara was for 21 years one of the official and state-paid movie
censors in Maryland. Her job was to review domestic and foreign movies
before they could be shown in the state, and to determine what could and
couldn\'t be seen by other citizens. -- Read More

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