E-Ink: Re-Inking the Culture of the Book

D.T. Max writes, in The Last Book, \"If computers finally replace trusted hardcovers and paperbacks, will our culture ever be the same?\" [more...] from The Utne Reader.


Filtering Round Up

COPPA Given Mixed First-Year Revue

A report released today by the Center for Media Education (CME), a non-profit organization monitoring online content aimed at children, said that in its first year of application, the Children\'s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) wrought positive changes but the industry is falling short of complying with privacy provisions. [more...] from NewsBytes.

More Fun With Studies

The PIP recently released the results of a rather uninteresting study that was reported almost everywhere for some reason.

They asked \"How concenered are you about the following types of internet crime\", and \"Which one of these types of Internet crimes converns you the MOST\".

From those 2 questions they draw this conclusion:
\"... and 50% of Americans cite child porn as the single most heinous crime that takes place online\"
Did I miss something there?
The #1 answer in to both questions was Child Pornography, but how did they arrive at that conclusion?

SiliconValley.com put it best when they said, \"People least worried about big Internet risk\".

eMarketer.com has a the Report broken down with lots of nifty charts and grafts.
So what have we learned here?
People worry about child pornogrphy [Which is horrible, awful and should be illegal, but doesn\'t come after you and steal your stuff], meanwhile they\'re being DOS\'d, or a Cracker [Note: not Hacker] just grabbed their credit card numbers.

If you are so inclined, you can actually go Read The Full Report.


Life is a library, and you are allowed to talk!

Mary Abdoney has this interesting story to share, she writes:

\"I have a story to share with you, however. I\'m sure you have seen the
very imaginative ads for Cingular wireless service. When the ads first
started, I absolutely fell in love with them and thought they deserved
an award. Until yesterday.

As I was driving in my car in the North Tampa area with my mother, we
spotted a billboard with that familiar little orange guy and his (or
her?) quotation bubble. The quotation is what got me; it read \"Life is
not a library. You\'re allowed to talk.\"



Lilbrary Funding Updates

The Daily Star has some Good News from Senator Charles Schumer.
\"America\'s neglected libraries are crumbling,\" Schumer said. \"In a modern world where education is the key to success, our libraries are out of date and out of place.\"

The bad news, passed along by Alison Hendon, is on RIF, she says:
\"We got an email message today at our library telling us that RIF funding was
not included in the federal budget. RIF (as you doubtless know) stands for
Reading Is Fundamental and is a program that gives away books to children as
a reward for reading. It is usually run through schools and libraries.
This is from Here


Web Freedom Lost

CNET has This Story that says A combination of new technologies, recent laws and international restrictions--sometimes related, more often not--are making possible a kind of online regulation once thought impossible.

Meanwhile, More than 60 federal Web sites violate U.S. privacy rules by using unauthorized software to track the browsing and buying habits of Internet users, according to a congressional report, Full Story @ CNN

The BBC simply says \"Cybercops arrest online liberty\"
This Story on your slowly eroding freedoms online.

Wired takes a look at a different kind of censorship in This Story on the increasing power of corporations.


If you open, they will come ...

Brian writes \"A library in Florida tries out Sunday hours and discovers that people come in and check out books. Story in the St. Petersburg Times.\"

And a completely unrelated story from NY has the memebers of New York City\'s largest librarians\' union getting a 16% raise. They [City Hall] had to defend the unusually large raises by saying they are having \"extraordinary\" problems with recruiting and retaining librarians See the NYTimes Story.

It\'s official: public libraries in Oz are for rec

Steve Benson writes \"A comprehensive survey of user satisfaction in public libraries in New South Wales has found that the greatest appeal of their services is for recreation and fun. The survey was done on 15,000 library visitors and the results are detailed in this this Sydney Morning Herald article \"

I wonder if this would be any different in other countries?

Budget Would Eliminate National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

When he was a congressman in 1970, George Bush voted to create the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. Now, his son wants to eliminate it. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.


Authors, Agents on E-Books\' Side

\"Authors and agents say what\'s at stake in the upcoming lawsuit over interpretation of book contracts is the entire future of the electronic publishing industry.

In Random House v. Rosettabooks, filed Feb. 27, Random House alleges it owns the electronic titles based on a clause in the author\'s original contracts that gives the publisher the right to \"print, publish and sell in book form.\" [more...] from Wired News.

2001 Pulitzer Prize Winners

2001 Pulitzer Prize Winners have been announced. Some of the winners include....

FICTION - The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon

DRAMA - Proof by David Auburn

HISTORY - Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis

GENERAL NON-FICTION - Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan by Herbert P. Bix.


Before Rowling, There was Jacques

Brian Jacques, best selling children\'s author of the Redwall series of books, as well as others, was recently interviewed by Andrea Sachs for Time Magazine. Read his interview [Here...]


Mr. Gates\' Xanadu

Ryan writes: \"Interesting article from front page of (the early edition, the one I bought at the subway station on Saturday afternoon) Sunday\'s New York Times on the burying of the Bettmann photo archives in Pennsylvania for the remote/merely-theoretical(?) enjoyment of the generations to come. Raises the question of archives for archives\' sake, why have \'em if we can\'t use \'em, private property vs. public\'s claim on cultural legacy. I didn\'t know much about the state of the Bettmann archives before I read this--

Full NY Times Story \"

Down By Law

Librarians are popping up in the darndest places these days. The Rogue Librarian, Carrie Bickner, has a Story over on A List Apart

Her story Down By Law is about the new US federal filtering mandates. She says \"The law is an ass\"

\"The flow of information is necessary to any free society, and libraries are a key mechanism in that flow. It\'s important to protect children from harmful subject matter, but clumsy, half-baked measures will not achieve that goal—they will only succeed in sacrificing the First Amendment. If libraries are forced to filter Internet access, the cost will be intellectual freedom.\"


HP Ad Redux

A few days back Helen wrote \"Check out a recent ad
by HP Labs, featuring librarian Eugenie Prime. Not sure
if this is a step forward or a step back . . . The Ad PDF \"

It\'s been submitted a few more times, with
one person taking a slightly different view, one person

\"The April 16th issue of Time has a very repugnant
ad by HP sterotyping
every librarian who ever existed - you might want to tell
them what you
think, pages 70-71, Not to mention that primpy frumpy
whatever is not a librarian!!!!!!!!!!!!!!\"

I just don\'t know what to say on this one. In a
profession obsessed with image, what does This Ad say about us?


Free Speech Movement Archives

Good Ol\' slashdot pointed me to This
from the San Francisco
on The remains of the fabled 1960\'s
Free Speech Movement.
They have 35,000 pages online now. They say
the text has been entered by hand by workers in India.

Check out the
FSM-A Site to
see what you missed in the 60\'s.

This weekend was also the FSM Symposium at UC Berkeley.

What\'s doing at Yahoo!

A Story on Yahoo! is making the rounds.
They say searching for anything related to the words
\"Nazi,\" \"Ku Klux Klan\" or even \"hate\" on Yahoo! will now
bring up banners promoting peace and tolerance. It
doesn\'t work for me, but maybe this is a plan for the
In other Yahoo! news...Now you See Boobies and
Now You Don\'t. They started to peddle
porn, but gave up when groupd like the AFA put up a
fuss.Remember, if you don\'t like it, that means it\'s
no good for anyone.


Changing English Words

Always helpful Lee Hadden writes:\" The column \"Newscripts\" in the journal Chemical and Engineering News
of the American Chemical Society, April 9, 2001, issue, page 64, has an
interesting account and a review of a new dictionary that documents the way
words in English are changing their meanings. The title is \"The Dictionary
of Dangerous Words\" by Digby Anderson (see:

For example, \"accident\" no longer refers to an accident any more, but
to society\'s aversions to the fact that anything is beyond our control.
\"...Accidents do not happen by accident anymore.\"


ALA Freaks Out Over Budget

Here\'s a Story someone passed along on the ALA reaction to the latest US budget.

They say President Bush proposed cutting federal spending on libraries by $39 million.

There\'s a rather odd quote in this story:

\"Mrs. Bush understands very well how libraries are serving this nation\'s communities,\" says Emily Sheketoff, executive director of the Washington office of the American Library Association. \"Certainly, the budget doesn\'t reflect that.\"

Did I miss something here? Is Laura now making budget recommendations?

Anywhooo... They say the funding cut could underwrite the cost of 867 librarians at an average salary of $46,000. Or it could buy nearly 1.1 million hardcover books or 161,463 magazine subscriptions.



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