Racist\'s case settled

The lawsuit filed against the Schaumburg Township District Library by Illinois white supremacist Matthew Hale has been settled. Hale sued after the library revoked permission for him to use a meeting room for a speech. He will now be appearing at the library on a Saturday evening, after closing time.

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Sklyarov Interviewed by New York Times

The Times caught up with Dmitri in Cupertino, where he\'s awaiting phase two of litigation :)

Dmitri Sklyarov rarely reads electronic books. \"There are almost no e-books in Russian,\" said Mr. Sklyarov, the 26-year- old Moscow cryptographer who was arrested in Las Vegas last month under a 1998 digital copyright law. \"I prefer paper books. They\'re much easier to carry with me, and can be read anywhere.\"

In fact, most people still prefer paper books. Unlike music and film, books have yet to be popularly accepted in digital format. Nevertheless, the nascent market has heightened the publishing industry\'s sensitivity to the potential for digital piracy, enough so that it has initiated the first criminal case under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998. And Mr. Sklyarov is the first to be charged.

[More (registration is required.)]

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NewBreed Feature: The image of librarians, real and imagined

Juanita and Colleen scored big with the new issue of NewBreed Librarian, as they have published some cool research by Deirdre Dupre, which finds that librarians are overconcerned with their image and status given the actual perceptions of the public.


A message from Juanita about the other content in this issue is inside:

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Would you like sour cream on that?

One of the sites I regularly check in my current hunt for employment is HotJobs. I\'ve noticed that when I search for "library" in the Illinois listings, a lot of the hits are ads for assistant managers at Taco Bell and KFC. Probably pay better than a lot of public library jobs ...

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Search Engines have no Smell

In an editorial for the Christian Science Monitor, Joan Silverman says search engines are inefficient but fast and convenient. But: \"There is no search engine that provides the scent and texture of a library.\" Her praise for the sense of community libraries provide is welcome, but it\'s more than a little troubling that a professional writer is doing her research using search engines instead of the library.

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The current state of \'fair use\'

In this interview, Lawrence Lessig, Stanford law professor and supporter of consumer\'s rights, discusses the current state of \'fair use\' in the context of peer-to-peer networks. Lessig is one of the more notable critics of the DMCA. He will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming O\'Reilly Conference on Peer-to-Peer and Web Services.

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Harry Potter Video Released ... It\'s Not What You Think

For Florida Today, Breuse Hickman writes...

\"Does reading the Harry Potter books turn kids onto witchcraft? Yes, according to a controversial, locally produced video entitled \"Harry Potter: Witchcraft Repackaged - Making Evil Look Innocent.\" more...

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Reading at the Rate of 10 Cents Per Hour

Chris Taylor writes, \"Come on, hurry up. The clock is ticking. This column will self-destruct in 60 seconds. Haven\'t reached the end of the first paragraph yet? That\'ll be another 25 cents, please. You think I\'m joking? Well, if one company\'s vision of the future of online reading is to be believed, folks who eyeball each line with a snail-like finger had better have deep pockets. On Monday Rosetta Books, a major player in the nascent e-book market, announced a \"$1 for 10 hours of reading\" deal. You pay a buck, download the book, then 10 hours later the text gets all scrambled up. Haven\'t finished? Tough luck; you have to pay again to unlock it. Right now this is just a trial deal attached to one tome — Agatha Christie\'s \"And Then There Were None\" — but you don\'t have to be Poirot to know that it won\'t end there, or that 10 hours\' worth of reading won\'t stay that cheap forever.\" more... from Time Even More from CNet News.

How and Why Are Libraries Changing?

Denise A. Troll, Distinguished Fellow at the Digital Library Federation has a draft of How and Why Are Libraries Changing? posted.

\"The purpose of this paper is to initiate discussion among a small group of university and college library directors being convened by the Digital Library Federation (DLF) and the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to explore how and why libraries and library use are changing. This exploration is envisioned as the first step in a larger initiative that includes conducting research and presenting the research results to library directors, their provosts, presidents and faculty.\"

Sometimes I think Cam wants to be a librarian.

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New Bibliomystery set at the New York Public Library

Matt writes \"The Christian Science Monitor\'s review of Allen Kurzweil\'s new bibliomystery.
The Grand Complication has enough librarian stereotypes to go around. However, the main character, a cataloger named Alexander Short, certainly reminds me of some of the characters I\'ve met in library school and beyond.

Full Story

My personal favorite of this sort of thing is Charles A. Goodrum\'s Dewey Decimated. \"

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Academic Face/Off on DMCA

Brian Surratt writes \"This article from the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses two Carnegie Mellon professors who are on opposite sides of the DMCA debate. David S. Touretzky (Anti-DMCA) is notable for maintaining the Gallery of CSS Descramblers at his college at CMU, Michael I. Shamos, was paid $30,000 by the Motion Picture Association to conduct experiments and provide testimony to support DMCA in court. The saga is far from over... \"

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Are Libraries the Next Napster?

Junk e-mail goddess strikes again. See what you miss when you\'re on vacation? It took me like 2 days to find the link to this from an e-mail message. God knows I\'d hate to be accused of lifting something verbatim. Anyway, every now and again, library stuff makes it into major news publications. Anyone seen Time lately? Someone is suggesting that we may be the next Napster. How so? Weren\'t we here first? Like over a hundred years first? more... if you really want it.

Government archive launched by the British Library

Charles Davis writes \"An internet archive of government papers dating
back to 1688 has been launched by the British
Library and 10 universities.
BOPCRIS, a site with 23,000 official documents,
offers insights into the processes of officialdom and
shows how little some things have changed.
A report to the Commons in 1718 warns of a
hackney carriage gridlock in Westminster. Another,
from the 1920s, recommends a farmers\' insurance
scheme against foot and mouth. The site address is
bopcris.ac.uk \"

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SearchShots provides Screenshot Previews of Search

Matt writes \"According to iaslash.org Searchshots.com provides screenshots for 1.3 million results. Uses the Open Directory project for the backend database.

Check out This for a sample from the library section.
\"


Also a somewhat related story from About.com on Searching the Web Like a Map and the tools you can use.

Librarians Quest for Benefits Yields Unkind Words

It\'s sad to think, in this day and age, that there are many professionals out there who not only go to work every day for a salary that is just about the same as the poverty level, but many also have no benefits. Some librarians at the Clermont County Library (FL) have decided to try to change that. Recently they set out to gather signatures on a petition. Although they gained quite a few, some folks were less than receptive to the cause. more... from The Orlando Sentinel.

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They Do Exist...

What a riot! Okay, anyone who knows me at all knows why I have no choice but to post this story ... I never knew there was such an institution as the International Motorsports Hall of Fame Library, let alone one so devoted to NASCAR. According to the executive director of the IMHF, \"it\'s the most comprehensive library on racing there is in the world. There\'s nothing else like it.\" I want that job. Go 22! more...

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Libraries Threatened By Globalization?

Just to tie librarianship to yet another vast and baffling issue, here\'s Fiona Hunt\'s essay on the implications of globalization for libraries:

Public libraries are in the public domain, supported by public taxes. Imagine an information services company entering a market and demanding the same subsidies and tax support that public libraries get. It would be entitled to do so under national treatment rules, providing it can prove itself to be the same kind of operation. The government\'s most likely response would be to cut back on or eliminate public funding to libraries so as to avoid similar claims in the future. Libraries could find themselves forced to generate income to survive. The worst case scenario is that, without public funding, libraries could disappear altogether. The public would then be required to buy their information from information companies or from libraries, if libraries could stay afloat by charging for their services. Either way, the public would find itself paying for information that was once in the public domain. [More from the Progressive Librarian]

Also check out Rory\'s earlier posting on this subject.

U.S. Fair Use Primer

Georgia K. Harper\'s brief and useful introduction to U.S. copyright law, with a focus on fair use and the D.M.C.A.:

The balance that copyright law has achieved between the interests of copyright owners and the interests of the public has evolved slowly and has been only periodically adjusted. Today, however, the pace and the magnitude of change threaten to skew this balance to the point of collapse. Some of these changes -- licenses, access controls, certain provisions in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) -- have the potential to drastically undermine the public right to access information, to comment on events, and even to share information with others.

More from the Journal of Electronic Publishing . Harper\'s earlier article \"Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials\" provides additional information on the tests used to determine fair use.

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Could Librarians Have Prevented a Death?

Helga sent along This Infotoday story on a death at Johns Hopkins’.

They say that evidence of the chemical’s dangers could easily have been found in the published literature. The Dr. , made \"a good-faith effort\" to research the drug’s adverse effects, using PubMed, butPrevious articles published in the 1950s, warned of lung damage associated with the drug. A previous article on this asked the question, \"Could Librarians’ Help Have Prevented Hopkins Tragedy?\"

The answer to that question is a resounding \"Yes.\"

Here Comes The Competition

The ever helpful Bob Cox sent along This Story from universitybusiness.com on new for-profit digital libraries.

They start by saying \"IF THERE IS ONE INSTITUTION on a college campus that has never faced outside competition, it is the library.\"

Now any number of a half-dozen companies would like to undermine the library\'s monopoly. They cover all the usual suspects, Questia, ebrary, netLibrary, XanEdu, and Jones.

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