How to Crack Open an E-Book

Wired is Reporting someone has cracked the encryption on e-books on the RocketBook which will allow the extraction of the content as plain text. The game of cat and mouse now begins with crackers always a step ahead. The cracker said...

\"My goal was, and continues to be, to point out the weaknesses of DRM (digital rights management) systems, in the hope that these systems will either grow so much to collapse under their own weight or be abandoned as futile,\"

Librarian/author James Still

Lee Hadden Writes:\"On today\'s \"Morning Edition\" talk show on National Public Radio, there
was an account of the librarian and author James Still.
The web page.\"

\"Remembering Writer James Still -- Host Bob Edwards talks
with professor Ted Olson about the works of Appalachian
writer James Still, who died at 94 this weekend. Still\'s
work was widely popular in the 1930\'s, but he never
received as much notoriety as other writers of the time.
Now a new collection of his poetry will be published by The
University Press of Kentucky in June. It\'s called \"From the
Mountain, From the Valley.\"


Shortage of librarians plagues library boom

Good news, Los Angeles has built five libraries and doesn\'t have enough librarians to work in the buildings.
They say it is not only a local problem. Nationally, the supply of librarians is falling far short of the rising demands. About 22% of the nation\'s 191,000 librarians will turn 65 in the next decade.
There were 1,000 openings at the ALA, but only 481 job-seekers showed up. Hopefully that means salaries will start to go up, and I won\'t have any problem finding a new job!
LA has The Story

\"The new librarian is really a swinging person, because he or she can manage information and that\'s an incredible skill in today\'s world. I mean, who among us hasn\'t done an Internet search and gotten 5,486 hits?But a librarian knows how to find that precise bit of information you need.\"

Finish Sam\'s Book

Speaking of Buffalo, the Buffalo & Erie County Library is running a Mark Twain Writing Competition
"A Murder, a Mystery and a Marriage,".Cash prizes of $5,000 for first place,
$3,000 for second place and $1,000 for third place will be awarded in the international
competition. It\'s easy, just finish the book and win! Read the First 2 Chapters and see what you can do......


Community Reading

Someone writes \"A very interesting program in Rochester, NY where the whole community read the same book: \"A Lesson Before Dying\" by Ernest Gaines.

Full Story \"

They say we tried it here in Buffalo last year, though I somehow must\'ve missed it. Great quote from the story:
\"encouraging everyone in a
community to read the same
book conjures up a social
phenomenon displaced long
ago by America\'s
TV-obsessed culture: a collective literary experience\"
Neat book, neat idea, anything to get people to turn off the TV for a second is a good idea.


An Easy \'A\'

The Houston Chronicle has This Story that seems to unfairly lump Questia in with paper mills and other ways students use the web to cheat. No doubt the internet is a cheaters paradise, but is Questia (or any of the other e-Libraries) making it easy to cheat?

\"Professors are really anchored in the book and printed culture, But the students aren\'t.\"

DMCA and Free Speech

The RIAA used the DMCA to stop a research project that involved hacking a watermarking technology promoted by the five major record labels. A few good stories to read up on this issue:

Is the RIAA running scared? from Salon says this move by the RIAA \"shows just how wary of free speech the recording industry has become\", but, this case could potentially undermine the widely disparaged DMCA.

Similar Story at the NY Times.

Wired calls it Another Stain on Copyright Law. \"Once again, the law intended to promote the distribution of content on the Internet has instead been used to restrict it.\"


\"Tin Drum\" legal fees OK\'d

The Oklahoma City Council finally decided Tuesday to
pay court-ordered legal fees for a man who sued after
police confiscated his rented videotape of \"The Tin
Drum\" because they believed it
contained child pornography.
Then they promptly forgot to actually authorize the
$143,047 payment. The city has now spent more than
$700,000 to settle the case.

James writes: \"The civic leaders have
dragged their collective feet for years, thereby fully
disclosing what fools they are. The reluctance to pay up
shows their ignorance and fundamentilst training in
that instead of paying for their lose, they continue to
keep the issue alive, perhaps hoping that god will take
pity on them and strike the ACLU and Michael Camfiled
dead and remove the \"sin\" of freedom to read and view
from Oklahoma City.\"

You can read more at the
Newspaper in America) The
Oklahoman Archives
aren\'t free, but there does
appear to be a number of stories on this subject. This
entire thing is just a sad joke.


On Library Services and Management

Judy Westbrook was kind enough to send along more
information on Robert S. Martin, just nominated to be
Director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

He was in charge of this outsourcing study , \"The
Impact of Outsourcing and Privatization on Library
Services and Management\". The study examined in
detail outsourcing of cataloging, selection, and
management of library operations. They say they found
no evidence that outsourcing per se represents a threat
to library governance, or to the role of the library in
protecting the First Amendment rights of the public.


The most fascinating library buildings in world!

writes \"I recently returned from an
extensive trip last week to some European countries to
obtain routine outside photographs of the national
libraries, as part of my ongoing book project to update
the 1999 Internet version of the forthcoming Book of
Library Records

I was left dumbstruck for more than half an hour when I
made my first trip to the new Bibliothèques Nationale in
south Paris, having seen
the old building in central Paris many times before.

But on the way home, I realised a new entry for the book
project will be a great idea: The most fascinating library
buildings in the world

I will naturaly want the opinions of all librarians to be
paramount, and not just mine, so I have decided to ask
librarians to give me their
vote for the most fascinating library buildings in the
world. \"

Find out how you can vote.........


Tests no substitue for RIF

Ron Force writes
\"An editorial in the Spokane (WA)
Spokesman-Review decries the elimination of the
Reading is Fundamental program in the Bush
education budget. They contrast the $23 million spent
on distributing books with the proposed $350 million
for testing. \" Kids won\'t learn to love reading if Big
Brother merely hands them a test. How about giving
them good books?\"
Full Story \"


What if Filters Don\'t Work?

Ender writes:
\"Okay, so now that it\'s mandatory that governments (libraries)
use filters, can we (in conjunciton) with libraries start sueing the
pants off of all the corporations selling filters as selling defective
products? And after we kill all of them off, or they restrict
themselves to all non-government users, we sue the government for not
providing libraries with filters - as there is no effective market for
government filters...\"

So if libraries are required to install filters, and the law turns out to be constitutional, is there any kind of legal recourse a library would have if the filters screw things up?

I\'d love to hold Microsoft responsible when Windows crashes and destroys all my data, is this the same kind of thing? My car broke down, can I sue Chrysler?
Ultimatly who is responsible when something you are forced to use doesn\'t work? Who decides if they aren\'t working?


Roget\'s Thesaurus Wronged

There\'s a neat Audio Interview [You need Real Player] with author Simon Winchester over on NPR.

\"...who voices his frustration with the misuse of Roget\'s Thesaurus. Roget apparently never intended his book to be used for finding synonyms at all -- its creation was merely a game to pass the time. Winchester is author of the bestselling book, The Professor and the Madman. His article on Roget will appear in Atlantic magazine\".

I\'m pretty sure it\'s in the issue I have at home, so I think the article is already out.


the oldest overdue book

It was Amnesty Week at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh so Lucille Colamarino returned a book due on November 10, 1924, that is $12,500 in fines. She was awarded a calendar organizer as a joke and a crown and sash for returning the book. Full Story

Is there a record for the most overdue book ever returned?

free access to archived journals

In September this year, many scientists could stop sending in papers to journals and refuse to renew subscriptions to them in support of a plan to create a huge Public Library of Science on the internet. Two new stories.Publish Free or Perish from Scientific American.

The BBC also has Scientists threaten journal protest.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

A review in The New Republic begins:

\"Some children dream of becoming astronauts when they grow up; others dream of becoming librarians. A.S. Byatt\'s characters fall into the second category...\"


Filtering Quickies says Web porno problem for library . A concerned mother collected 300 signatures to get a single filter installed.

Southbendtribune has Library official: filters don\'t work in which Cass District Library Director M.E. Harper there\'s not a problem in the first place [with porn in the library].

Installing Internet filters seen as problem is from MI, where they cover CIPA from the libraries view.

This Story covers a few companies that make different kinds of filters.


Libraries in a Digital and Aggressively Copyrighted World

Ann Bartow has written an intersting Paper that looks at how technology and legal issues are affecting libraries. It\'s a great paper that covers the past, present and future of the legal issues that surround libraries.

As Fair Use is slowly taken away from us using laws like the DMCA, Copyright Term Extension Act, and who knows that else, I really think this is the kind of thing we need to be worried about. Where is the passion and emotion I see in the filtering issue when it comes to legal issues?


Wanted urgently: WAP sites for Librarians

Godfrey Oswald writes: \"Hello

Due to the massive response I have received around the world for WAP sites for
inclusion in the Info Connect Directory, I have decided to provide links here
to a selection of reference WAP sites of interest to librarians that have been
sent in.

The full list of all WAP sites will be available with the launch of the Info
Connect LIS Directory WAP version (based on WML).

The current list of reference WAP sites for librarians is at:

When you get to this link, scroll down till you get to \"WAP sites for

Please help me by e-mailing more WAP sites.


Godfrey Oswald.

Godfrey Oswald MSc.
information scientist and author.
London. \"


The Semantic Web

Scientific American has an Interesting Story by Tim Berners-Lee (you may know him from such projects as the WWW) on what they call \"The Semantic Web\"
The Semantic Web will bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can readily carry out sophisticated tasks for users. Kinda like what librarians do now.



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