Lies and the Land: Maps at the British Library

\"Lie of the Land: The Secret Life of Maps\", an exhibit investigating how maps have been used distort or justify our perceptions of the world, has just opened at the British Library:

Some maps deliberately set out to deceive. Many show a selective view and reflect only the interests of the people who made them. Stunning maps from ancient to modern reveal a secret world. In every case there is more than meets the eye. As well as over 100 maps and other exhibits from the British Library\'s superlative collections, there are interactive screens and events to help you explore the themes further . . .

Highlights from the exhibit are available online.

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Is Shakespeare Now Canadian?

Bob Cox sent along This Washington Post Story on A 1603 Painting in Toronto Purports to Show the Young William Shakespeare, if they prove to be right, the picture may be the only one of him painted while he was still alive.
The owner says the portrait was painted by an ancestor named John Sanders, who may have been an actor in a theatrical company owned by Shakespeare.

\"It looks to be quite conceivably a 1603 painting of someone. Whether it is Shakespeare, we won\'t be able to answer,\" says Christina Corsiglia, curator of European art of the Art Gallery of Ontario. \"We don\'t know what he ultimately looked like.\"

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Libraries are the next Napster?

Time has this article on the conflict between publishers and libraries over issues of copyright in the electronic age. Not an in-depth look, but an interesting overview all the same.

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Libraries in the Ancient World

The International Herald Tribune today has this review of the book \"Libraries in the Ancient World\" by Lionel Casson. It includes a look at the history of the original library of Alexandria as well as descriptions of \"curses invoked by different cultures to protect their libraries from thieves\". Now, that might be quite useful!

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The Overdue Librarian Cops Cartoon

Something to liven up your afternoon - a short and funny parody of \"Cops\" from The Cartoon Network featuring a librarian on patrol to bust folks with overdue books!

Scroll to the bottom and click on the link labeled \"Overdue.\" Flash software is required to view the cartoons.

Here\'s The Latest Link.

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Libraries on the Radio

John Guscott writes \"Just wanted to let you know that the NPR show The Connection had
a program called \"The Future of the Public Library\" on air last week.
The show is Archived.
The guests were Catherine Dibbell, Director of Public Services from
Boston Public Library, Suzie Neubauer from the Robbins Library in
Arlington MA and myself. The show focused on what libraries are doing
today in the wake of increasing competition from mega-bookstores and the
Internet. Not exactly news to librarians, but since it was a call-in show,
it\'s interesting to hear the public\'s take on this issue.\"

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More Harry Potter humor

The folks at Top Five have identified 15 mistakes in the upcoming movie other than that backwards-broomstick thing. They begin with #15, \"Harry is never once shown with owl poop on his shoulder.\"

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Bibliotheca Alexandrina to open this fall

Matt Eberle suggested
This One from The Washington Post on the Bibliotheca Alexandrina which is scheduled to open in the fall.

As with all large projects, they are dealing with years of delay, budget overruns and controversy over its warehouse-style collection policy.


\"We want to give maximum freedom to allow it to be an interlocutor\" with the world\'s great academic and research institutions, said Serageldin, The library director. \"One of the benefits is that it churns up intellectual activity in Egypt.\"

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Unlucky library thief

Matt Eberle sent in This One on a would-be thief that tried to rob a library while the local policeman was giving a presentation on crime statistics.

The Citizen newspaper said Superintendent Christo Heunis was addressing business people last Tuesday when the building\'s alarm went off.


\"It was quite ironic. I was actually presenting crime figures at the time,\" the newspaper quoted Heunis as saying.

Open letter from librarians protesting the police violence in Genoa, Italy

There is an open letter from librarians, written by Mark Rosenzweig, protesting the police violence at the anti-globalization demonstrations in Genoa, Italy, on the web and ready for your signature. I signed it, not because I am opposed to globalization per se, but I am opposed to the way it is happening and definitely opposed to the police response in Genoa, which has been incredibly brutal. The signable letter is at http://libr.org/PLG/Genoa.html, on the PLG site. It is also copied inside if you follow the internal LISNews link. You may also be interested in the Library Juice feature issue on what has happened in Genoa and it\'s coverage in the media. Apologies to those who object to anything non-library related, but as professionals we exist in the larger world.

Mistakes and Failures at the Desk

Don Warner Saklad passed along Mistakes and Failures at the Reference Desk By Lydia Olszak
This study, based on data collected through observation and structured interviews, explores the incidence of mistakes and failures by reference staff in an academic library. Three main questions are addressed: (1) what actions or behaviors constitute a mistake or failure? (2) what techniques are used by reference staff to alert each other of mistakes? and (3) do mistakes at the reference desk conform with the typology developed by Bosk in his study of medical mistakes? Results suggest that reference librarians must deal with competing goals and that providing a correct answer may not be the most important goal for every transaction.

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17th-century texts stolen from Oxford

Always helpful Charles Davis passed along This Times UK Story
on several 400-year-old theology books that have disappeared from the Bodleian Library at Oxford, just days after thieves tried to
snatch precious watches, silver and gold from the university’s
neighbouring Ashmolean Museum.

The 17th-century books, worth about £20,000, had been
available to study on request and were not in display cases.
They think ten large volumes were smuggled out of the library, concealed in clothing.

Traditional publishing\'s latest horror story

Cliff writes \"This is an interesting article especially because it suggests some interesting ideas on how this technology will or could be used. It\'s too bad publishers find this a threat rather than think of it as a business opportunity, but perhaps that\'s the bias of this article\'s writer. This kind of tech will make trees more endangered than ever, as books can join the ranks of \"throwaway\" status if this technology becomes widespread. One can imagine some publishers priting very cheap copies of books, meant to be thrown away (trashy novels, for example?)

Full Story from Digital Mass \"

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Gates gives $4.2 million to UK libraries

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has donated $4.2 million to British libraries, reports this story from the Times (UK). The money will be used to provide information technology learning centres in 350 libraries serving some of the most deprived areas in the UK. It will be very welcome as the government wants all 4,300 of Britain\'s libraries to be online by next year, no easy task.

The Warrior Librarian gets makeover

Earlier this month, there was a story about the very funny site of Biblia, the Warrior Librarian, written by a school librarian and full of good stuff. Now, \"in an effort to compete with sites that look nicer than Biblia\'s old site\" Biblia is getting a major makeover and the site is now called Warrior Librarian Weekly. It\'s well worth a look, there\'s some great new content there too. Following Biblia\'s example...(there is no more to read).

Sep 1st Deadline for Public Library of Science Demands

Matt Eberle writes \"September 1st is the deadline for the Public Library of Science demands to be met. 25,000 scientists have pledged to publish in, edit, review for, and subscribe to only journals that agree to make articles available after a 6 month embargo.


Full Story\"

Child pornography in the suburbs

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that a man has been accused of downloading child pornography at a suburban library. Of course, it gets turned into a story about filtering: Library says no to Net filter despite porn case.

Strange how we never seem to get similar angles in other kinds of crime-in-the-library stories: "Library says no to security cameras despite assault," etc.

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Being an Anomaly: Male Librarians

A great article from Ex Libris that I hope hasn\'t been posted here already:

I know what it\'s like to be the only woman in male-dominated organizations -- uncomfortable! -- so I always wondered what it was like for men to work in female-dominated professions like librarianship. A while back, I asked my male readers about their experiences, and several of you responded. I also read a survey of male librarians in the March, 1994 American Libraries, and a book by Christine Williams, Still a Man\'s World: Men Who Do Women\'s Work. Between these, I think I\'ve gotten some sense of the pleasures and awkwardnesses of this situation. (More)

Thanks to New Breed Librarian

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E-Books Flowering in China

The Chinese government\'s recent move to restrict Internet access has not stopped e-books from attracting an audience there:

A portable e-book device is now available through The Xinhua Book Store in Xinhua, China. The Xinhua E-Book, which has been developed with a Taiwanese tech company, connects to the Internet and supports multimedia Audio visual programs. The Xinhua Post has created a channel for the device. At another Chinese site, Eshunet.com, e-books are free for the taking. (In Chinese, \"shu\" means book.) All titles are in EXE format and over 700,000 units are downloaded each day. Eshunet encourages redistribution, such as posting e-books to other sites or mailing them to friends, and has obtained permission from its authors to give their work out for free.

More from Wired

Electronic Publishers Coalition Condemns Criminal Use of DMCA

\"Persecution of an individual shouldn\'t be any company\'s response to a commercial disagreement, especially regarding copyright,\" Connie Foster, the EPC executive director said Sunday.

All members of the EPC -- not just a small portion of them as with print-oriented groups like the AAP -- work with the Adobe and other electronic formats to publish their e-books, and we recognize that the same technology that benefits publishers with lower production and distribution costs also aids copyright violators.

In this case, readers\' interests should be paramount, and the leading e-book formats -- Adobe\'s among them -- slight them by making it impossible to open an e-book when upgrading to a new computer or when suffering a number of all-too-common computer woes, such as virus infection and hard-disk failure.\"


Read the Full Release.


The Electronic Publishers Coalition was founded by a group of publishers committed to furthering the growth of the e-book community. It is the largest trade association of electronic publishers in the world. A primary role of the EPC is to follow through on its commitment to develop a healthy marketplace for digital content as well as to take a leadership role in setting minimum standards in order to encourage quality within our industry.

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