Home alone — and at the library alone

An editorial in the Seattle Times says:

\"Libraries are icons of our sense of community. They\'ve long been seen as safe havens where adults and children spend hours immersed in books, maps and videos.

Now they want to limit children. It\'s not that libraries don\'t want children.\" It calls for more common sense and less rules. Full Editorial

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Oppose Expanded Government Secrecy!

Amy Kearns writes \"I got this alert from the ACLU!
TAKE ACTION! SEND A FREE FAX IN JUST TWO CLICKS! TO OPPOSE EXPANDED GOVERNMENT SECRECY!
You can read more and send a FREE FAX from the action alert Here


Last year, with little debate and no public hearings, Congress adopted an intelligence authorization bill that contained a provision to criminalize all leaks of classified information. A firestorm of criticism from civil libertarians, major news organizations, academics and LIBRARIANS resulted and President Bill Clinton vetoed the bill. Unfortunately, at the request of Senator Richard Shelby (R- AL), this year\'s intelligence authorization bill may include the identical provision.
\"

Separating Students From Smut

Wired has a rather indepth Look at Filtering and CIPA. They say 75 percent of schools use filtering already.

\"We believe schools should be a safe haven for children –- a place for children to learn and grow, not cesspools for the destruction of the minds and souls of children,\" said Kristen Schultz, a legal policy analyst with the Family Research Council.

Seems as though the internet is still the least of most peoples worries:


\"We have far more complaints about written materials like certain classics, novels, and plays than anything having to do with Internet resources.\"

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125 years later, Twain fans end a story

Someone writes \"the USAToday is running a Story story on Mark Twain\'s unpublished \"blindfold novelette\" entitled \"A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage\". The summer issue of The Atlantic Monthly ran it, and the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library launched a writing contest to finish the mystery that drew 730 entries from as far as Japan and Australia. The winners will be announced Oct. 13.
\"

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Breaking Microsoft\'s e-Book Code

Slashdot pointed the way to This Techreview Story on An anonymous programmer that has found a way to decrypt Microsoft Reader e-books.The decryption program enables purchasers of \"owner-exclusive\" Microsoft Reader titles—Microsoft\'s most highly protected form of e-book—to convert these titles to unencrypted files viewable on any Web browser. The programmer hasn\'t released it, saying he developed it for his personal use.

The Very Real Threat of the D.M.C.A.

If you have any doubts about the chilling effect of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act on free speech, take a gander at this article from Salon. A British medical research firm has used the Act to force a U.S. ISP to remove the page of animal rights group critical of their work:

On Thursday, EnviroLink Network, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit Internet service provider, took offline two Web sites belonging to the animal-rights activist group Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty. The action came in response to a letter sent to the ISP earlier in the week by Huntingdon Life Sciences, a British medical research firm. Citing the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), Huntingdon accused the activists of violating its copyright. Although no charges have yet been filed, under the terms of the DMCA, Envirolink was forced to remove the sites to avoid potential legal liability. \"It\'s very clear that Huntingdon Life Sciences just wants to shut them up,\" says Josh Knauer, the founder of Envirolink, which provides free Web hosting to nonprofits . . .

More. This is a truly disgusting development.

U.S. Copyright Office: No Substantial Changes to D.M.C.A.

After a review of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the U.S. has concluded that offline copyright law does not apply to the digital world, and that the anti-circumvention clause does not merit further attention:

The study does give critics some ammunition to work with. It asks legislators, for example, to clarify whether temporary copies are legal, and advises Congress to give users of digital content the right to make archival copies. But the report also rejects the argument that offline copyright law should apply to the digital world, calling the analogy \"flawed and unconvincing.\"

The study also refuses to address the energetic public outcry over the DMCA\'s controversial anti-circumvention clause, which prohibits the creation and distribution of methods for getting around copyright controls. While it acknowledges that most of the people who criticized the law -- at public hearings and via e-mail -- \"expressed general opposition to the prohibitions on circumvention of technological protection measures contained in [the anti-circumvention clause section 1201], and noted their concerns about the adverse impact that section 1201 may have on fair use and other copyright exceptions,\" the Copyright Office, which falls under the authority of the Library of Congress, sidestepped public concern. . .

More from Salon (the free part.) The Copyright Office report can be found here.

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Parents call book too explicit

Katie Pesznecker of the Anchorage Daily News writes:

\"Two parents of Anchorage grade school students say the sexual health book \"It\'s Perfectly Normal\" is not perfectly normal reading for their children and want it off school library shelves.\"

The book got national praise for it\'s \"normal\" look at sex education. Full Story

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Smackdown at the Library

Bob Cox passed along a A Short Story on that WWF read-in that happened in MI the other day. WWF stars Stacy Keibler and Rhyno did the reading.


\"We\'re going for the reluctant reader, the male teenager that the WWF appeals to,\"

Salt Lake City PL New Director

Jill passed along more about SLC PL\'s new non-MLS director froma member of the board.
Full Story


\"Jim Cooper\'s business acumen, dedicated support for the library programs, ability to interact constructively with numerous constituencies and government interests and his deep commitment to the Salt Lake Valley community were viewed by the board as credentials more compelling than an advanced degree in library science. \"

Constitutional Freedom to Read Recognized

Luis Acosta writes \"There is an interesting item in today\'s Washington Post\'s \"District Extra\" section (not to be confused with the Metro section) about a U.S. District Court decision that recognizes the freedom to read:
Full Story
The decision at issue in the story is posted on the web page of the U.S.
District Court for the District of Columbia,
here.
While the defendant that lost is a public library, the decision recognizes the first amendment right to freedom to read/freedom of information, and therefore is good news.\"

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Potter porn.

Calliope pass along This Story from MSNBC on the burgeoning Harry Potter Porn stories on the web. They say it\'s produced and consumed almost entirely by young women. Google Points The Way.
Warner Bros. is not very happy:

“It is not only our legal obligation, but also our moral obligation to protect the integrity of our intellectual properties,” the statement says. “This is especially true in the case of indecent infringement of any icon whose target audience is children.”
It\'s funny to read the have morals.

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It Scans, It Formats, It Translates, but Can It Do This...?

There\'s a new version of software that will read scanned documents and convert the text into a format that you can edit. It also will recognize up to 114 languages. While it\'s doing all that, it\'ll even proof itself to make sure it captured every character from the original. Then, if you want it to, it\'ll read everything back to you, in one of 14 languages, over your computer\'s speakers. While that\'s all well and good, I\'m still waiting for the software program that will do the dishes, fix dinner, change diapers, put the laundry away, scoop out the litterbox, sort the trash, and walk the dog. more...

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Separating Students from Smut

Katie Dean writes...

\"Over the next year, schools will be in danger of losing precious technology funding unless they can certify they have a filtering system that blocks obscene websites.
The Children\'s Internet Protection Act requires that by Oct. 28, schools must certify that they are either in compliance with filtering requirements, or are in the process of becoming compliant by evaluating blocking software. For many schools, it will be easy to comply. According to the Consortium for School Networking, 75 percent of schools use filtering already.\" more... from Wired News.

Library Bans Free Weekly Newspapers

Roger Aylworth, writing for The Chico Enterprise Record, asks...\"Do free weekly newspapers belong in a library lobby?\"

A decision by the Meriam Library at Chico State University says, \"no.\" and the decision has some publishers screaming foul. more...

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First Seattle, Now the World (Toronto to Read One Book)

The Toronto Star reports that Toronto\'s librarian\'s are planning to follow Chicago\'s lead. The first idea Toronto borrowed from Chicago was the cows.
Although the program could begin as soon as next year, the mayor has yet to embrace the program and no book has been chosen.
Credit for the original idea goes to the Washington Center for the Book. See also...

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The Giver Won\'t be Found in These Public Schools

The Aurura, (CO) Public School System is avoiding the controversy over Lois Lowry\'s \"The Giver,\" altogether. According to a spokesperson for the school district, \"That book is not included in any curriculum within the district,\" Lynch said. \"As far as I know, it\'s not even in any media centers.\" more... from The Aurora Sentinel.

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OH School Libraries Link Up

For The Tribune Chronicle, John Booth writes...

\"By next fall, students in Trumbull County, OH will have a card catalog at their fingertips that stretches from Bloomfield to Hubbard, from Kinsman to Newton Falls. The final pieces of the puzzle are ready to fall into place, thanks to grant money enabling 16 school libraries in four districts to automate their card catalogs and link their computers to a countywide network. Federal Library Services and Technology Act funds awarded through the State Library of Ohio will provide more than $156,000 for the projects. In order to earn the grant, the schools had to agree to spend one-quarter of the funding - just more than $52,000.\" more...

Making books with the obsessed

Jill passed along This SFWeekly Story on the San Francisco Center for the Book, a nonprofit gallery/schoolhouse/studio in Potrero Hill. The center supports the book arts -- that is, letterpress printing, typography, bookbinding, ya know, stuff that librarians just looooove

\"Most people simply read books, but I like to smell them. New books are the best: Slightly sweet and enticingly chemical, they reek of glue and ink and other mysterious binding fluids.\"

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Lawyer Lessig raps new copyright laws

News.com has a nice little Piece on Stanford Law School professor and technology pundit Lawrence Lessig\'s keynote address at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo.

\"Employees at Smith & Wesson don\'t worry if guns kill police officers,\" Lessig said. \"Some uses are illegal and some are not. But if you wrote code that could be used for good or bad, you\'re arrested and sent to jail...There\'s something screwed up about that.\"

My analogy is this:My car goes about 100, which is totally illegal, and yet I bought this car, and it\'s legal, and I can make it go 100mph if I\'m so inclined.
Imagine if they passed a law that made it illegal for just Ford to sell cars that went over the speed limit.

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