Understaffing in Ontario’s Elementary School Libraries

The CLA is Reporting on a staff shortage across the river in Ontario. Ontario’s elementary school libraries are so understaffed that many are open only five hours per week.

\"The results of the survey, which has been conducted annually since 1998, show that the number of libraries in Ontario staffed by teacher-librarians has declined by 15 per cent over the last three years (for more details, see (The Report). And according to the report, constraints in the provincial funding formula have caused a number of boards to eliminate teacher-librarians altogether. Not surprisingly, the survey also found that the trend toward volunteer staffing of libraries has continued.\"

Ontario, Canada, that is. It\'s lovely this time of year.

Support for Software Law Eroding

The LA Times has a Story on UCITA. It seems support for the law is quickly eroding as folks find out what the law means for them.

\"Arne Larsen, director of information systems at Horizon Blue Cross in Newark, N.J., said his company\'s software buyers have already rejected one contract clause that would have invoked UCITA and will keep on fighting it when it reappears. \"

Can a library oversee a Museum?

Someone writes \"Can a library system oversee a \'Contemporary Art\' museum? It looks like the University of Arizona is trying to figure this out:


The Wildcat from the U of Arizona has a
Story on by a decison to keep The Center for Creative Photography under contol of university libraries.

Some say that its function as a museum would best be served if \"liberated from control of the university library system\".

I like that term \"liberated\", like it\'s being held hostage.

The Snarky Librarian

Are You a Snarky Librarian?:

Hate your job?
Hate your coworkers?
Wish you\'d taken a completely different career track that did not involve dealing with books and/or the public?
Read the letters in American Libraries and wonder why these people bother?
Attend a professional conference and pretend you\'re not a librarian?
Look at your library school classmates and think about how annoying they are?
Fantasize about your supervisor\'s going-away party?

You sound Snarky to me!
Check out The Snarky Librarian.

Shaking Things Up

Jessamyn West (the New Jessamyn West, editor of librarian.net, not the famous author) recently did a guest column in Marylaine Block\'s Ex Libris e-zine entitled SHAKING THINGS UP: PROGRESSIVE AND RADICAL LIBRARIANS.

Marylaine introduced the column this way:

\"I asked Jessamyn West, who calls herself an anarchist librarian, to explain for me and my readers the variety of views and organizations on the leftward fringes of our profession. Trust me, nobody who reads this will ever again think librarians are sweet little ladies in sensible shoes.\"

InfoEthics 2000 Conference Papers

UNESCO just had its INFOETHICS 2000 conference in Paris, the Third UNESCO Congress on Ethical, Legal and Social Challenges of Cyberspace. A number of papers are available from the conference, some in English. They are available here. The list of papers is as follows:


The information society and the expectation revolution
by David Konzevik


The changing shape of information and the role of government
by Thomas B. Riley


Public sector information initiatives in the European Union
by George Papapavlou


Access to information and \"public domain\" in the post-\"perestroyka\" Russia: a paradoxal experience.
by Ekaterina U.Genieva


Access to telecommunications in the internet age
Arthur Levin


Accessibility to rural and remote areas
by Yasuhiko Kawasumi

Networks and information services: government policy
by Jean-Noël Tronc


Fair use and access to information in the digital era
by Carlos M. Correa


Copyright and its limitations in the digital environment
by Bernt Hugenholtz


How Can Fair Use Doctrine Be Applied For the Appropriate Level of Copyright Protection in the Global Marketplace?
by Euisun Yoo

Preserving fair use in the digital age
by Barry Steinhardt


Copyright and the freedom of accessing information in the cyberspace
by Andras Szinger


Ten commandments to protect privacy in the Internet world
by Hansjuergen Garstka


The legal protection of the right of privacy on the networks
by Amr Zaki Abdel Motaal


The future of privacy : David and Goliath revisited
by Simon Davis


Human dignity in the cyberspace society
by Adama Fofana


Interception capabilities 2000
by Duncan Campbell


Once again, the papers are at http://webworld.unesco.org/infoethics2000/papers.html.

E-Learning a Booming Business

I thought that this piece from Hoovers might be of interest. The number of digital textbooks continue to grow at as fast a rate as the distance learning environments. In fact...\"according to International Data Corporation, the number of students enrolled in e-learning courses is growing 30% annually and will reach 2.2 million college students in 2002. Additionally, over 80% of all higher education institutions will be offering e-learning by 2002.\" -- Read More

More Ghost Stories

Where was this one from Oregon Live 3 weeks ago during halloween?\"She\'s described as a loving woman who liked to dress in blue. Nobody knows much about her, except that she was a dedicated librarian in Snohomish in the 1920s and \'30s.

So dedicated that some think she\'s still there.\" -- Read More

Bring out the Reading Mobile

The Baltimore Sun has this story about a bookmobile that promotes reading by find those that don\'t go to the library.\"Harford County Public Library officials have rolled out their latest effort to reach children sometimes left on the sidelines when it comes to library use, launching a $135,000 vehicle dubbed \"Rolling Reader\" and packed with computers, Internet connections and more than 3,000 books.\" -- Read More

E-Mail Makes the World Go \'Round

Computers In Libraries has a nice Story by D. Scott Brandt on the use of eMail in libraries. He talks about how librarians use eMail to make friends and help patrons.

\"E-mail technology really enables librarians to have all sorts of relationships with patrons from around the world.\"

Not a Prophesy

Bob Kaehr writes:

When in the not-too-distant future (five-to-10 years) nearly all
books and periodicals become digital and libraries become archives, what
will happen to academic (even school, public and special) library personnel?
Will libraries be taken over or delivered into the hands of information
services? Will there be mass dismissals of traditional \"book people\"? Oh,
that\'s right, we\'ll just re-train? :>} Will faculty, who can teach \"library
exercises\" from within the classroom (e.g. How to Use Information
Databases), need traditional BI? Will there need to be circulation
personnel other than a clerk and a few aids to charge and discharge those
oldies but goodies? Will for-profit companies become the selectors for the
various publics by virtue of the collections they are able to offer?

Continued... -- Read More

New network links libraries online

This News.com Story on The Collaborative Digital Reference Service (CDRS) is quite interesting. The trial run began Friday, about 60 libraries took questions from library patrons. The first question sent through CDRS came from a library in England and was answered in Santa Monica, CA. The question asked for the most recent books published in English about ancient Byzantine cuisine.

\"Rather than watch idly as Internet companies like AskJeeves, Google or Yahoo fill the void, librarians believe their expertise, research collections and specialized catalogs not available on the Internet enable them to answer questions quickly and completely--for free.\" -- Read More

Open Source Bible

Here\'s a funny one from BBSpot on the new \"Open Source Bible\". It seems the pope does not like it, he\'s too \"busy dealing with all the flamers\".


They even include the Sourceforge page!

Note:For this to be really funny, you need to understand what Sourceforge really is.

\"The biggest complaint about the Bible has been about the numerous variations of the book. Therefore the project\'s main goal is to unify the different versions of the Bible into one coherent work.\"

Oprah Goes E

E Booknet has a piece on Oprah giving away 350 of RCA\'s new REB1100. This is the woman who moves HUGE numbers of real books everytime she chooses a new book to read, imagine what this is going to do for the entire eBook market! Will this be like Stephen King going online with his book?

Presidential Inaugurations Online

The Library of Congress has made available at its American Memory Web
site an online collection of selected materials to celebrate the
inaugurations of the presidents of the United States. \"I Do Solemnly
Swear\" Presidential Inaugurations consists of approximately four
hundred items from each of sixty-two inaugurations, from George
Washington in 1789 to William Jefferson Clinton in 1997, and will
include items relating to the sixty-third inauguration of 2001. Check it out at: memory.loc.gov/ammem/pihtml/

The SLIS UNDERGROUND

SLIS Undergroundsent in a link to their site, rather intersting for those fighting the powers that be:


The medium, SLIS UNDERGROUND, was created with the intention of providing SLIS students enrolled at the University of Wisconsin - Madison with a forum in which to express their opinions about library and information science and their educational/professional experiences within the field.

geocities.com/slis_underground/mainpage.htm

Realizing that much of what we are being taught is subjective.
Realizing that information itself is subjective; everything is changed, greatly or subtly, by the filter through which it passes.
Understanding that as future librarians, archivists, catalogers, indexers, school media specialists, editors, censors, and free-thinking students of human nature we have a right to comment upon and question all information.
To bring to ideas to the forefront and provide a media through which comments can be made for which there was no time in class.
To encourage critical thinking within the SLIS student body.
To show the SLIS faculty that we care enough about library and information science to go to the trouble of establishing an entity beyond the academic establishment through which we can further discuss what we are being taught, what we are reading, and how the information is being presented

Anatomy of a book controversy

Bob Cox sent in In Depth look on some book challenges in GA. The Savannah-Chatham County Public Schools Board of Education initially voted 4-3 not to allow the use of \"In Cold Blood,\" \"A Lesson Before Dying,\" \"Stones from the River,\" \"Lords of Discipline\" and \"Catcher in the Rye.\", then re-voted after they said to make sure that summer reading lists for AP English students contain at least 10 choices and are given out one month before school ends. The books ended up NOT being banned.

\"As far as we are concerned, you are still stonewalling the concept of parental/citizen involvement. This whole process has been disgusting and demeaning. The endorsement of putting trash in the minds of children by a school system is horrifying to think of and it is dangerous to the social stability of this great country.\"

Textbook case of self-censorship

Lois Aleta Fundis sent in This almost funny story from Freedomforum.org on some silly censorship down in TX. The State Board of Education approved a reading textbook for 5th that was \"revised\" after two Republican state legislators complained about a picture of Vice President Al Gore and a brief accompanying article.

\"\"The bottom line is the publisher self-censored this book under implicit threat that the far-right contingent on the State Board of Education would grandstand and bully [the publisher], because that\'s been their behavior for the last six years,\" Smoot told The Freedom Forum Online. \"These members of the state board have a long and rich tradition of going after textbooks for such absurd things as disliking a photograph of a woman carrying a briefcase, decrying the number of pages devoted to (farmworker organizer) Cesar Chavez and even saying one history book depicted slavery in too negative a fashion.\"

Internet Search FAQ

Here\'s a really cool site sent in by Bob Cox. The Internet Search FAQ covers all the bases, \"how can I find\", \"how can I find it faster?\", \"should I pay?\", and \"where can I get help?\", are all covered.

\"Although this website was compiled originally for writers, it has become increasingly clear that this FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) list is of use to anyone who wants to find their way around the Net. \"

How to Get Books in the Library With No Money

Greenville News has this story on the creative ideas that school librarians have to get books on the shelves.\"In addition to holding the usual book fairs and cranking out applications for grants, they\'ve cashed in aluminum cans, sold candy and school supplies, urged parents to shop at certain grocery stores and use certain credit cards and accepted hand-me-downs from college and university libraries updating their collections.\" -- Read More

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