The Librarian\'s Image, Unrevised

Sunday\'s NY
Times
has a nice Story from Karen Schneider on the
image of the library profession.

\"Call me a loser,
but I\'ve actually read the same book twice in the same
week, just because I liked it, then took time to discuss it
with friends. \"

Copyrights on Web Content are Backed

Lee Hadden sent this in:

\" An article in the Wall
Street Journal by Anna Wilde Matthews, \"Copyrights
on Web Content Are Backed\" (Friday, Oct. 27, page
B10), discusses a decision
by the Library of Congress\'s Copyright Office, to limit
access to the content
of web pages on the Internet. The argument between
libraries and
entertainment companies has been around for some
time, and the decision will
protect the copyright of commercial endeavors with only
minor exceptions.
\"

Hennen\'s American Public Library Ratings 2000

Hennen\'s American Public Library Ratings 2000

The newly revised HAPLR Web site was re-opened with new data today announced Thomas J. Hennen Jr., its author. HAPLR 2000 is featured in the November 2000 issue of American Libraries magazine, a publication of the American Libraries Association. The previous edition was featured in the September 1999 issue.

-- Read More

Inside Google

Olinux.com has an Interview with Sergey Brin from google, who talk about how google works, and their very interesting mission:\"Google\'s mission is to organize the world\'s information, making it universally accessible and useful.

Sounds like a library? They have over 6,000 servers that run RedHat 6.2 linux, serve 50 million searches per day, and over 25,000 websites use their engine!

They [Olinux.com] have a google of interviews with other open source folks, if you\'re interested -- Read More

Library shelves interfiling

Sunspot.net has a Story on how The North Carroll library had been experimenting with shelving adult and children\'s nonfiction books together, but now the county library board of trustees has voted to stop interfiling the books. They had consolidated 31,581 adult and childrens nonfiction books into the adult section in June, to make more room for children\'s fiction books in the children\'s section, and to allow patrons to find information in a single place.

\"\"It exposed children to adult materials, We were incredulous that this was being done - it was just so inappropriate.\" said Donna Schott of Manchester, an active library patron.

Naperville has top library in nation again

Our own Thomas Hennen made it into the Chicago Sun-Times yesterday in a little Story. Hennen\'s American Public Library Ratings was released and The Naperville Public Libraries, in IL, was the top of the heap. This is the third straight rating as the best library in the country for its size for Naperville.

You can also check out the full ratings online at the HAPLR 2000 Ratings Page

A wiz of a reading

The Toronto Star has the Full Report on J.K. Rowling\'s huge reading at Sky Dome in T.O. on Monday. 20,000 folks showed up to hear her do some reading even though seats down in front were $235(I think that\'s about 2 bucks in U.S. Dollars).

\"A young boy, maybe 10, sat between his mother and his sister. He wore no costume and made no fuss, but he carried a copy of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

As Rowling read, he followed along. The first time she spoke a line as Harry, he broke into an enormous grin. \"

Forever in blue jeans

Someone sent in this Story from Wisinfo.com. Things must be pretty boring in Neenah, because the Library Board voted 4-3 last week against the implementation of a dress and grooming code. It says the Library Board struggled to develop an acceptable and enforceable code. The first proposal specified 22 items of inappropriate clothing, including underwear worn as outerwear. Is there a fashion trend starting at the libraries in WI?


\"The consideration of a dress code has generated diverse opinions among library employees and has led to the resignation of one circulation clerk.\"

Should Librarians Help Support Masturbation?

Kell Yusuf writes \"...the question seems answered by a recent Rosensweig email in the affirmative.
Given his official ALA association, that\'s the only inference to be made when he writes:


\"`masturbation,\' for example, is not a vice: it\'s a normal sexual outlet and it should be actively described as such to children and they should be taught about it by trained professionals! That\'s pedagogically and medically sound. That\'s in the best interests of the child. We should, to put it bluntly, be sex-positive, in favor of sex education, of providing information about abortion...\" and \"...ALA [should] find allies in the educational profession, in the legal profession, among politicians, in the social work and child development profession...\"


Why not be more blunt or go further? Let\'s recruit librarians to actively locate and collect net porno and train children to find it on the net to support their sexual curiosity and thus encourage them to use this material for jerkin\' off. What better way to support our allies on these other professions? The full text of his email missive is dated Oct. 11, 2000, a more recent one than the email from him posted before at:
worldnetdaily.com \"

Internet filter plan hits snag: it doesn\'t work!

Lois Fundis writes \"Apparently even Congress is beginning to realize that \"The Internet-filtering software pushed by Congress to protect children from smut online is blocking far more than pornography....The software\'s uneven performance puts a snag in the politically attractive solution that Congress is trying to include in an education spending bill before it adjourns.\"


And even a vice-president of SurfCONTROL, maker of CyberPatrol and SurfWatch, admits, \"My chief criticism is that I don\'t think it\'s necessary because schools are already doing what they need to do to protect their students.\"


Yahoo! News has the Full Story
\"

What are you looking for?

I was doing some house cleaning and thought I\'d share some interesting search terms people have entered on LISNews.com, some are strange, some are funny. Judge For Yourself:

microsatellite dna
GASB34
macintosh computer
LIBRARIANAVENGERS
"Do you have sex"
jamie
chocolate chip cookies
worlds rainforests
homosexuality
sprague
Fiber Optics
vehicle maintenance
mousercise
Cereal
Natural resources of Texas
Arrowhead Trail Accomidations camping
latchkey
church of Satan
oxygen atom
big six
subito
monster of shark
mousexercise
eyes de la quimica
boobies
Little Black Sambo
drew carey
Pesdisids
methalbromide
lobster
sex
pictures of the human heart
catnip
http://www.lolitasex.com/
obsessive compulsive disorder
gamlet
my brother sam is dead
Dentistry|Web site
soil salinization
marine bacteria
feotus
eyewitness
verteporfin
Saklad
Bye, bye bacteria
bioflavonoide
tyranny
The Executive Producer
nudes
are not are too

Mapping Information

Cliif Urr writes \"This interesting article, referred to from the peterme.com web log, seems to invite professional communicators to undertake tasks that seem virtually identical to what librarians do. Also, distinguishes \"maps\" from \"stories\" as a way to organize information, and claims \"maps\" are supplanting stories for this task. Sample text: \"From a postmodernist perspective, we might instead begin to value the idea that technical communicators\' talents lie not in their skills at taking (and simplifying) dictation but in constructing novel and useful (if contingent) structures in fields of information. In other words, business and technical communicators do not write documentation or author reports, but make maps. What better job than mapmaker in an era when information is portrayed to users as a confusing, jumbled tsunami of data?\"

Read It Here
\"

The Porn Only OPAC

News.com has a Story on a new piece of software called ImageFilter from LookThatUp. They say the software classifies visual information by color, texture, shape and spatial configuration, It\'ll then analyze the data to make a sort of fingerprint for each image that is compared to other images. If it finds a questionable image, ImageFilter will email you! All those hours wasted surfing for porn at the local public library are over! Now you can just sign up and let this little baby get your porn for you!Now, I know your saying to your self, \"Blake, what does this mean to me, the average librarian?\", well I\'ll tell you!
I have 3 magic words for you.... -- Read More

T. Herman Zweibel for the Children

T. Herman Zweibel, Publisher Emeritus over at The Onion has decded He Will Decide What is Appropriate for Children, so stop worrying about filters and banning books and all that junk, leave it up to Herman!

\"This Republic has once again succumbed to the notion, common in prosperous times, that children are precious porcelain cherubs who should be kept in velvet-lined gilt boxes and protected from the harsh realities of life. They say I should not be publishing the swear-words in my news-paper, nor the teats above the front-page fold, where children may see them.

The Frankfurt eBook Award Winners

The Frankfurt eBook Award Winners have been announced. Awards were given out in the following catagories:
Technology Award
Original eBook Category
eBook Converted from Print Category
and The GRAND PRIZE WINNERS. (\"Paradise Square\" and \"When Pride Still Mattered\")

Monday Updates?!

I know its not Friday, but I found a bunch of articles that I thought you guys might like. Here they are, in no particular order: new Clinton Library, author controversy, library closings, evolving libraries, Filters only a bandaid, and libraries as technology training centers. -- Read More

Libraries evolve with info age

Newsobserver.com has a nice Story on the school library of the year 2000. Most of it won\'t be news to you (did you know the school personnel once known as librarians prefer to be called \"media specialists\" now?), but it is still a nice look at how things are going in some school libraries.

\"The more resources you have, the farther you can get beyond the school walls and the more relevant an education will be,\" Bradburn said. \"At the the low end we have schools that have very little technology, maybe just one computer with Internet access.\"

J. K. Rowling Terrified in T.O.

Mayor Mel Lastman [Toronto\'s chief Muggle] gave J.K. Rowling the key to the city yesterday, and when she spoke at a fundaraiser for the Osborne Collection of the Toronto Library, she admitted she\'s just terrified about the big event. Part of the International Festival of Authors is a reading by Rowling at the Sky Dome, Never Been?(it\'s quite a place, worth the trip, wherever you are). Her biggest audience in the past was 2,000 in Germany, the Sky Dome holds 36,000. Did you know her friends call her Jo?

``The reading is a way to reach a lot of children. But I\'m plainly not a rock star, not the Rolling Stones.\'\'

The Full Story is at The T.O. Star

Conservative Groups Oppose Library Filtering

Cluebot.com has posted a Letter from some conservative groups, including American Family Association of Oregon, and Libertarian Party of Mississippi who all oppose library filtering [H.R. 4577]. They choose education over filtering.

\"Nothing is more effective than efforts to educate parents and children about Internet safety and how to properly use online resources. Moreover, Internet filters are an imperfect solution to this important problem. With millions and millions of web sites already online, and more added every day, children will always be able to access content we might wish they couldn\'t. Education programs can help them to deal with the very real danger certain kinds of content could pose; Internet filters offer a false sense of security on this issue. \"

Librarians Ignore the Value of Stories

Here\'s an interesting essay from The Chronicle written by Wayne A. Wiegand,a professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.


He says people go to the library to find stories to read. Folks are looking for material that inspires them or affirms their identities. Mr. Wiegand says the problem is librarians have little knowledge of why people read what they do, therefore librarians tend to lack a deeper understanding of how libraries serve some readers. This is a missed opportunity to show evidence to state legislatures and other sources of financial support that spending money on stories is important. Librarians are also often not able to help people find the right story to read and don\'t develop enough programs to connect readers to one another. He puts part of the blame on library and information-science programs, that have ignored the literature on reading usually undervalue the reading of stories.

What about you, do you know why people come in, what they are reading and why?

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