Guinness Book of Records Sold

From The Dispatch Online (London, UK)...

\"The Guinness Book of Records, the benchmark reference of the world\'s feats and sporting facts, has been sold to a new owner for about R5 billion.\" Geez. I wonder if they\'ll change the name? [more...]

Topic: 

Free Online Scholarship Newsletter

Peter
Suber
writes \"LISNews readers might be
interested in the Free Online Scholarship (FOS)
Newsletter. It is devoted to the migration of print
scholarship to the internet, in all the fields of the
sciences and humanities, and to efforts to make it
available free of charge. Subscriptions, of course, are
free.


ht
tp://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/index.htm
\"

Topic: 

A Non Research Doctor of Library Science?

Elizabeth Christian writes:\" A one year ALA
accredited degree is just the beginning of library
education. However, what is available after
that is the choice, either a research based library
school research degree that is applicable primarily to
teaching in a library school, not to practice.


There have been some practice based doctorates, but
it is now time to encourage library schools to move into
this area. New options for web based education make
this now easier for library schools to provide this
degree to practitioners.


This is a survey to determine if in fact there is an
interest and what kind of degree would be desirable
from the practioners\' perspective. \"

Here\'s A Link to the survey, or you
can reach her by email @ echristian2 at yahoo.com

How I now ended up packing to move to Aruba!

Richard R.
Shook
has written a nice look at how he found a
job in sunny Aruba. If you\'ve ever thought of getting out
of North America, see how he did it, and maybe you can
join him!
He writes:

\"On March 3 I signed a contract to be the
Librarian at the International School of Aruba. On my
school librarians‚ listserv (lm_net) over 30 librarians
asked me questions and then I was asked to jot a few
notes about the experience of finding an international
school job. Here, I\'ll try to address these requests.

\"20,000 librarians with credit cards . . . \"

Publishers Weekly\'s assessment of ALA 2001:

An upbeat spirit on the show floor was directly related to reports that, with few geographic exceptions, library budgets continue to grow. And although libraries are spending more money on electronic equipment and digital information, they are also buying more books. George Coe, CEO of Baker & Taylor Library Services, said his company\'s library business continues to expand: \"Our business is up considerably over last year. This is a great show for us.\"

Topic: 

NYT Book Reviews back issues before 1996 Gone

Mary Minow writes \"One of our eagle-eyed bibliographers found This Today on the NY Times site:

\"Search The New York Times on the Web Books


* Books Archive: For the past four years, it has been our pleasure to provide a full-text search of the New York Times Books archive of reviews, news and author interviews dating back to 1980.


To comply with a recent United States Supreme Court decision, we are limiting that search to the period from January 1, 1996 to the present. In the period prior to 1996, The Times typically did not have written agreements with freelance book reviewers to permit republishing reviews in
electronic form.

Topic: 

Anchorage Mayor to ban all nonlibrary displays

Mary Minow passed along This Story from the Anchorage Daily News on the big gay pride exhibit at the Anchorage city library. It seems his lawyer said \"Don\'t put it back up and don\'t allow displays by other nonlibrary groups\", so he did.
The group will begin to review the exhibit policy.

Topic: 

Library Operations Outsourced in TX

Mary Musgrave passed along This Dallasnews.com Story on the decision that will hand over operations of its new Lancaster Veterans Memorial Library to a company based near Washington, D.C. [LSSI].

They say the facility still belongs to the city and the council still makes all policy decisions and library employees would keep their jobs.

\"They wanted to make the hours the library was opened more in line with what the community wanted – maybe Sunday afternoons,\" Mrs. Filgo said. \"We haven\'t had a library director since February, and I feel like we\'re to a point where we need some professional help. We\'ve had good professionals, but [LSSI] brings expertise from a national standpoint.\"

Teachers vs. Librarians, Live from the Beehive State

Tanya writes \"The Granite School District Board of Education in Salt Lake City, UT has voted to eliminate school librarian positions if the local teachers association requests a pay raise over 1.4%. Have the board members been watching the Sopranos to brush up on their strongarm tactics? This is the classic, \"If you do what I say, I won\'t shoot the girl\" scenario. According to the Board Report, if the teachers association wants higher raises, the 35 librarians will be moved to teaching positions and the media centers will be staffed with media \"assistants\" who will be paid hourly. The claim is that this move will save $1 million dollars (imagine Dr. Evil\'s glee!)


To read the report visit granite.k12.ut.us
then click on BOARD REPORT about halfway down the page.
\"

Hacker Invades Library

Jason Kristufek writes...

\"A computer hacker got into the Burlington Library\'s Internet Web site and put \"drug-related and nasty words\" on the site\'s main page, Library Director Kay Weiss said. Weiss does not know the exact time the main page displayed the disparaging and drug-related words, and no one other than library employees has said that they saw it. \"It was just a coincidence that about three weeks ago someone developed a program that sniffs out weaknesses in Web sites and then relays them to hackers,\" Weiss told the Library Board.\" [more...] from The Hawkeye.

Topic: 

Library Criticized for Building Plans

The Freeport Public Library is undergoing some major changes. People are complaining because the new library will have a meeting room and a coffee shop. The coffee shop was requested by patrons and a meeting room is always something that can benefit the library and the community. I guess ya just can\'t please some people. [more...] from The Journal Standard.
And, here\'s even more.

Topic: 

A New York Library and University of Pittsburgh Clash Over Documents

This sounds almost like a custody battle of sorts, but it\'s over some documents. They\'ll either go to one library, or the other, or they\'ll \"visit\" both. [more...] from The Pittsburgh Tribune Review. Even more here from The Pittsburgh Post Gazzette.

Topic: 

Book returned nearly 73 years late

Bill sent along This Story on a man that returned a slightly worn, hardback copy of \"Les Miserables,\" due back to the old Covington Library on Sept. 24, 1928. Library officials said they considered some kind of fine, but decided just to let the man go on the day he returned it in late May.

Good thing he didn\'t try this in Minnesota, he\'d be whisked off to jail!

An Animiated History of Books

The BBC has a cool new site called An Animated History of Books.

They start with cave paintings and go right on through today, and beyond. Comes complete with disembodied, floating, talking head of Shakespeare.

Topic: 

Post-Tasini: Pity the Librarians

Kendra Mayfield writes...
\"For publishers reeling from a recent Supreme Court loss, it\'s time to pay freelancers whose work has been republished in electronic databases without their permission. But rather than pay up or face billions in liabilities, publishers are deleting tens of thousands of freelance articles spanning decades. So who will bear the brunt of that extra work? The librarians, of course.\" [more...] from Wired.

Books-N-Stuff

Ryan Carter (not That Ryan) writes: \"USA Today article on the goings-on of YA books that deal with the same stuffs as do teens--violence and sexuality and stares, oh my! Mentions some good titles and their authors, touches on the importance of YA in public libraries, gets some blurbs from YA luminaries.
Also a ditty on the speedy disapparation of Tolkien books from library and bookstore shelves months before the movie opens.

Topic: 

Library Helps Restore Respectful Image of Ultimate Urban Horror

Ravaged with drugs and gang shootings, this community received national attention, including being demoralized by former President Clinton after a three-year-old girl was shot to death. Now, as part of an ongoing effort to improve the community and shed the image of what some have called \"the ultimate urban horror,\" they\'re building a library. [more...] from The L.A. Times.

Topic: 

Internet Users Champion the Presence of Disfavored Books in Public Libraries

Lou Marano writes...
\"In a study released this month, sociologists at the College Park, Md., campus found that Internet users appear to be more open, tolerant, trusting, optimistic and literate than non-users. This cannot be dismissed simply as
the profile of a younger and better-educated group, the researchers say, because they controlled for these and other demographic factors and found that the mindset held up regardless. Internet users were found to be significantly more likely to support certain nontraditional roles for women and to champion the presence of disfavored books in public libraries.\" [more...] from Virtual New York.

Topic: 

Copyright Victory Could be a Catch 22 for Freelance Writers

Wired reports today that the recent victory for freelance writers may not be so great afterall. According to the article, \"A major problem for writers is that many publishers, anticipating a loss in the Tasini case, have begun demanding that freelancers sign away all rights to their articles, including electronic rights, for no additional payment,\" said freelance writer Miriam Raftery in an e-mail. This sign-or-else mentality forces freelancers to choose between short-term survival and long-term stability.\" [more...]

Limited Copyright Exemption for Distance Learning Doesn\'t Include Libraries

Brian Krebs writes...
\"Legislation that would provide a limited copyright exemption for distance learning received a cozy reception from a House Judiciary subcommittee and its panelists today. The bill, S. 487, unanimously passed the Senate in a voice vote earlier this month, but only after a lengthy standoff between educational groups and the publishing industry...another bill would have extended the same exemptions to not-for-profit libraries, a possibility that was rejected during discussions on the bill in the Senate.\"
[more...] from NewsBytes.

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