Library Hours Restored at U. of South Florida

The students have been heard.

Tampa FL, Tampa Bay Times: Students gathered outside the University of South Florida library Thursday afternoon, prepared for another night of sit-ins and camp-outs to demand the ability to study at all hours of the day and night.

Melissa Grazon passed out pens, encouraging students to write letters to administrators, when news cameras started to gather in the grass. Everyone walked over to see what was happening. They stood there, absorbing the announcement.

After a hotly-contested reduction in library hours, administrators announced that the Tampa campus library will return to a schedule of being open 24 hours a day, five days a week, possibly within a week's time.

A Bookish Haven for Americans in Paris

Little known to tourists, the American Library in Paris has existed since books were first sent to WW1 doughboys. Here the LA Times gives us perspective on both the history of the library and its current operations. Here's the library's website.

Like every library in the world, it is challenged by changing reading habits. “I’ve understood all along — every library understands this — that if all you’re doing is warehousing books and being a lending library, you’re going to die,” director Charles Trueheart, a former foreign correspondent from the Washington Post says. “You’ve got to offer people all kinds of other stuff, now that they may be going for books in another way. ... And our programming is not just authors, but it’s art appreciation, music, fashion, education, politics, current events.”

The library also contracts with U.S. universities to provide services to American exchange students and compiles study material for French students seeking accreditation as English teachers. Indeed, for all its appeal to Americans in Paris, the library has plenty of French members and supporters.

“There are a lot of French people who are very serious about keeping up their English, and they come to events in English at the library,” says author Diane Johnson, who has lived off and on in Paris for decades and chairs the library’s Writers Council, composed of such colleagues as Julian Barnes and Adam Gopnik.

At Library of Congress, changes are afoot in technology as well as in physical space

From The Washington Post: "The Library of Congress no longer needs the computer room that visitors once used to search its electronic card catalogue. These days the entire library has a wireless Internet connection, so workers this summer put a collection of old microfilm machines in that room instead. Meanwhile, the library’s old-school physical catalogues, the kind filled with carefully penned index cards, have long since been relegated to cool basement hallways where schoolchildren marvel at their obscurity. “I told them, ‘Before Google, this is what we used to do,’ ” said Fenella France, the library’s chief of preservation research. “They had never seen [card catalogues] before. Then I was teaching children another day, and I said, ‘Let’s go clockwise,’ and they just looked at me. I said, ‘Oh, no. Didn’t you learn analog?’” These are some of the several quiet moves that hint at much larger changes underway at the Library of Congress." Full Story

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) is now available at http://citesandinsights.info

The issue is 48 pages long. The single-column 6x9 "online reading version" is 65 pages long.

In fact, most of the regular version also fits into a 6" width; it's made up of book samples that didn't reduce neatly to the narrow column of the two-column version.

The issue consists of one big essay in six smaller portions plus an introduction:

The Front: Books, Books and (Books?) pp. 1-48

It's all about books--specifically, Cites & Insights Books for libraries and librarians: What may be happening with older books, two important new books, one potential new book and two new combinations of old material.

Weeding the Virtual Bookstore pp. 2-3

Some of the existing Cites & Insights Books may go out of print (that is, be removed from potential production) shortly. This section explains why, which books are involved and why--if you actually want one of them--you need to act soon.

Your Library Is...: A Collection of Public Library Sayings pp. 3-10

An inspiring and interesting tour through what America's public libraries choose as their mottoes and slogans on their websites, based on a complete scan of all 9,000+ libraries (or at least those for which I could find websites). 1,137 unique mottoes and slogans, plus 88 mottoes and slogans shared by 205 libraries. General comments, price and availability (this one's available as an $8.99 PDF!) are followed by the Cs: Sayings from libraries in California, Colorado and Connecticut, roughly 9.5 of the 157 text pages in the book.

$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets, Vol. 1, Libraries by Size pp. 10-24 -- Read More

Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

Amazon launches Kindle Matchbook: discounted e-books for those who own the hard copy

if you've bought one of 10,000 selected titles from Amazon, you'll be entitled to snag a digital copy for between $2.99 and nothing. The service launches in October and there's no limit on when the purchases were made -- meaning that you could be offered an awkward reminder of the literature you were gorging back in 1995.

Endgadget press release coverage

With Modern Makeovers, America's Libraries Are Branching Out

NPR piece discussing some of the changes and strategies being implemented in libraries.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #250

And we're back even though we're now illegal in Vietnam! Then again, so is the rest of LISNews as we discuss in the program. The hiatus is over and normal programming resumes notwithstanding September 2nd being a holiday. In this week's episode we talk about the threat of the Syrian Electronic Army and preparing for it. We also have a unique news miscellany that ends with a fun item from the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Speex) (Extremely Hi-Fidelity Audio via Free Lossless Audio Codec), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. New reading material for the Air Staff can be purchased here.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/. -- Read More

24:00 minutes (9.65 MB)
mp3

Questions For Hugh Howey, Author Of 'WOOL'

NPR piece: Questions For Hugh Howey, Author Of 'WOOL'

Wool - Part One is a free download on Amazon.

Disclaimer: The free first segment of Wool leaves you at a cliffhanger that makes you want to keep reading. The entire multi-part story is available for $5.99. See - Wool Omnibus Edition (Wool 1 - 5) (Silo Saga)

You can buy part 2 for .99 if you want to try one part after the free part without investing the full $5.99.

Cape Town Central Library, South Africa, Break World Record for longest book domino chain previously held by Seattle Public Library

Hi
Could you please door a story on the following:
The City of Cape Town Central Library, in Cape Town, South Africa, broke the World Record for longest book domino chain previously held Seattle Public Library. Here is a link to the a report on the event.
http://bookslive.co.za/blog/2013/08/27/open-book-and-cape-town-central-library-break-world-r...

Thank you

Rudi Wicomb
Librarian
City of Cape Town

Library logistics: How millions of new books make it to the shelves

The library system orders books, CDs and movies daily, timing them to hit the shelves on the same day as they would in bookstores. Items also are ordered when there are at least twice as many requests from the public as copies available.This year, the library is to spend $7.4 million on materials.

It’s a precision-timed logistics that few library patrons notice, unless something goes wrong.

“We say that nobody talks about technical services until something isn’t there,” said Laura Simonds, manager of the operations center at 101 S. Stygler Rd. in Gahanna. “If we’re doing our job really well, the book is always there.”

Full story (Piece includes video)

Choosing a Book...by Its Cover

According to a few distinguished members of the library community, they don't tell you in library school that you WILL occasionally choose a book by its cover, despite what the song says.

If you've had that experience, either choosing a book to read for your TBR pile or a book to add to your library's collection BASED ON ITS COVER, please let us know in the comments below. Thanks!

New Books From J.D. Salinger?

J.D. Salinger Will Publish Five More Goddamn Books
According to Salinger, a new documentary produced by the Weinstein Co., and a corresponding 700-page book of the same title by the film’s director, Shane Salerno, and co-author David Shields, he spent at least some of that time at a typewriter. The new investigation into the author’s life claims that Salinger left behind explicit instructions to his estate to publish five books beginning in 2015. The New York Times reported that Salinger’s new works include: a “story-filled ‘manual’ of the Vedanta religious philosophy”; a book called The Family Glass, with five never-before-seen stories; another collection of stories called The Last and Best of the Peter Pans, which will revisit the Caulfield family from The Catcher in the Rye; a novella based on Salinger’s years as a soldier in World War II; and a new novel set during the same period about the author’s first marriage.

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

More than 90 percent of Americans say public libraries are important to their communities, according to the Pew Research Center. But the way that love translates into actual financial support varies hugely from state to state.

Which state funds their libraries better? Vermont or Kansas? Read the NPR piece to find out.

School Librarians Belong in NYC Schools

The New York City Department of Education, one of the largest educational organizations in the world, has effectively given up on librarians. As DOE officials call for a variance to state law which requires the presence of a school librarian in every middle and high school in the state they have passing up on a key, high performing, cost effective, tool for student success.

There is a strange dissonance when it comes to libraries. We are both armored by our stereotypes and defeated by them simultaneously. People are ready to hurl themselves on the barricade of our intellectual freedom but when budgets come we are universally tisked and shuttled off into the budget memory hole, quickly snipped away. The idiom of the dusty shelves comes up in the press every time in order to evoke mood.

Full piece

Nothing to read? Airport libraries to the rescue

It's appropriate that a book celebrating the 75th anniversary of Nashville International Airport includes a page -- and a charming photo -- documenting the library branch that opened on-site in 1962.

Staffed by a librarian who received an extra $4 in her paycheck to cover airport parking, the Nashville Public Library reading room was the first time a public library was ever established in a municipal airport.

Full story -- USA Today

The Books That Bring The Civil Rights Movement To Life

NPR partial compilation of books about the Civil Rights Movement.

A library card may get you more than you think

NBC News ran a story Saturday evening titled -- A library card may get you more than you think

Several LISNEWS articles have covered this type of story recently but I think it is useful for librarians to know and see pieces that provide national coverage.

You can view the story here.

Death Keeps Typewriters Alive, Clacking

Typewriters are still popular and used for many things, including funeral homes and prisons. A recent model is transparent, so contraband can't be smuggled in with one in prison environments. "They proved popular behind bars. In Texas, state prison inmates have purchased more than 1,500 Swintec typewriters since 2011 from penitentiary commissaries for up to $225 a pop, according to Jason Clark, a spokesman. Swintec typewriters are in Washington state prisons' libraries and even some inmates' cells."

Read more about it at: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323639704579013240996151948.html?mod=WSJ_hp_Ed...

A Unique Digital Music Service, For Locals Only

Just as e-books have begun working their way into libraries, librarians are grappling with how to embrace digital music. At the Iowa City Public Library, an unusual licensing arrangement with local artists is having some success.

Full story

Why shutting down Groklaw & Lavabit was a bad move

Read opinion piece here.

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