Is It Cornstarch, or is it Anthrax?

Lee Hadden writes: \"An article by Matthew Rose, \"Cornstarch Dries Ink, but Terrifies
Magazine Buyers,\" is in today\'s Wall Street Journal, October 31, 2001, on
pages B1 and B4. Cornstarch is used in the publishing business to dry ink,
and to prevent static electricity so pages won\'t stick together when
binding or mailing. It is used in many popular publications, such as Vogue
or Reader\'s Digest or Vanity Fair. However, the white powder residue can be
terrifying to those who aren\'t familiar with the magazine publishing
business, and many people think it may be anthrax spores. \"Before we sell a
magazine, we have to convince consumers it isn\'t going to kill them,\" one
publisher said. Read more about it in the Wall Street Journal.\"

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Library Considers Conservation of Materials a Luxury - Cuts Preservation Staff

The State Library of Victoria (AU) is cutting its conservaton staff because, according to a report by senior management \"the systemic conservation of library collections is becoming a luxury.\" more...

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Road Rage on the Information Superhighway

Aaron Tunn sent along
This Transcript of an excellent interview with from Radio National down in Australia.

I\'m not even sure how to summarize this one. It\'s about copyright, control of information, the information services industry, the publishing industry, libraries, and who owns what.

It really is worth a read.

\"So in that process there are a whole series of players, and how this will all shake out ultimately electronically, is going to be one of the fascinating questions. Either it will increase to a few very small, dominant, very great profit-making multinationals, or there\'ll be a deconstruction of the vast majority of the literature back to the authors for self-archiving and distributing in the old electronic college way.\"

The Invisible Library

The Cutest Dog In The World sent along a link to The Invisible Library, which I think we linked already, but I can\'t find it.

The Invisible Library is a collection of books that only appear in other books. Within the library\'s catalog you will find imaginary books, pseudobiblia, artifictions, fabled tomes, libris phantastica, and all manner of books unwritten, unread, unpublished, and unfound.

Check out The Catalog of books and The Librarian\'s Office

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Supreme Court zaps violent game law

Andrew Mutch writes \"A precursor to the Filtering legislation\'s fate before the Court?

Full Story \"


The U.S. Supreme Court upheld a decision by a lower appeals court to block the enforcement of an Indianapolis law that required children to have parental consent and/or supervision when playing arcade games that are deemed too violent.

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Filtering Deadline Passes

I came across this one at Geek.com. Not that anyone necessarily wantd to read more about filtering and its affect on federal funding, but editorials are always worth a perusal, or three. be sure to scroll down for the opinions of Bob, et. al.

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Libraries are a Whole New Business

Once viewed as cold edifices, where equally cold, bun-laden librarians shushed everyone, including the mouse in the corner, libraries have evolved into hi-tech businesses which successfully mix and match tradition with trend, creating a hub of community services and a fun gathering place for all. more...

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Amazon Dumps Windows, Saves Millions with Linux

In a move that could potentially spell disaster for the folks at Microsoft, online retail giant, Amazon.com has dumped the Windows operating system for Linux. In all of its open sourceness, could Linux possibly become the new kinder, gentler wizard of OS? more...

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NY Times Computers Shut Down by Apparent Hack Attack

From ZDNet,
First it was an Anthrax scare, now their network has apparently been hacked. Someone seems to be targeting the New York Times. According to the network administrator, \"We don\'t know that it was malicious, but there seems to be no innocent explanation.\" more...

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Safeguarding European Photographic Images for Access

Mark writes \"SEPIA (Safeguarding European Photographic Images for Access) is a EU-funded project focusing on preservation of photographic materials. On this website (http://www.knaw.nl/ecpa/sepia/) you will find information about :

research: \'scanning equipment and handling procedures\', \'preservation aspects of digitisation\', \'ethics of digitisation\' and \'descriptive models for photographic materials\'

news and events: containing announcements and press releases about the latest SEPIA news, a calendar of events and references to relevant resources
training: about SEPIA workshops, seminar and national SEPIA training events
orginal proposals for SEPIA I and SEPIA II
SEPIA partners and associate partners: cooperating SEPIA institutions
This website is also a platform and a source of information for anyone who wants to know more about the preservation of photographic materials.
\"

Librarians want book selection to be State Wide

Jen passed along This one on Missouri librarians that want the whole state to read the same book. The project is called \'Read MOre\" and the book is \"Farewell to Manzanar\" by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston.

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Identifying and Responding to User Needs at the National Library of Australia

A paper delivered at Victoria University\'s recent symposium Revelling in Reference:

Growth in Internet usage, a continuing increase and availability of electronic resources and changes to the delivery of information continue to have a huge impact on libraries and the expectations of our users. There are both similarities and differences in the provision of reference and the delivery of information to onsite and offsite users. The National Library has recently undertaken three focus groups of onsite users and in 2001 will undertake a survey of our remote users in an effort to identify the changing needs and expectations of library users in the digital age. A change from mediated reference involving personal interaction between librarian and user is being supplemented and in some cases replaced by unmediated reference through the provision of guides, subject gateways and online catalogues. It would seem that one thing is certain - users are becoming ever more demanding of libraries to provide electronic resources, in full text, at no cost and with no wait.

More. Thanks to The Virtual Acquisition Shelf and News Desk.

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Milestones of Academic Librarianship

The ALA (Actually The ACRL) has put together Over 100 years of progress, a list of milestones of academic librarianship.

They run from 1876
• American Library Association founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Among its founders were three major figures in American librarianship: Justin Winsor, William Frederick Poole, and Melvil Dewey.

Up to 1998
• Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 and Copyright Term Extension Act.

They seem to have missed, Nov 2 1999, LISNews is launched

Net-porn law applies deadline pressure

Business 2.0 is kind enough to Point Out Schools and libraries have until Sunday to show they\'re taking adequate steps to block access to online pornography on public computers, this because of Children\'s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).

\"The Internet is an amoeba,\" said Owen Seitel, a partner at the law firm Idell Berman & Seitel, which is not involved in the lawsuit. \"It\'s always changing, so it\'s hard to have a good filter.\"

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Pro-filtering site gets a taste of its own medicine

If you go to the SafeSurf website, you\'ll see a link to Breaking News: SafeSurf warns of Stealth Censorship. Click through, and you\'ll see a press release about how Mail Abuse Prevention System, LLC, unfairly included SafeSurf on a list of spammers, thus preventing some netizens from gaining access to its site.

Excuse me, but isn\'t that one of the strongest arguments against filtering in the first place?

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Ask The Bookshare Folks

The fine folks from Bookshare have agreed to an LISNews interview. Share is a service that helps Stanford students coordinate sharing their books, movies, and music across campus.

Seems like a nifty idea, which may or may not be Reinventing the Wheel, but I\'d like to see what kinds of questions the LISNews audience has for them.
This is the first interview we\'ve run in awhile, so I\'ll expalin how it works. I gather your questions, and send them along, the answers come back, and I post a new story, with the questions and answers.

SO if you have questions, ideas or comments on BookShare, you can email them to me[], or use the Contact Us form, or just post them below. I\'ll send the question collection along to BookShare on Friday, and post the answers as soon as I get them.

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Dispute over land planned for Clinton Library Complex

The Nando Times among others has this story on the dispute between the City of Little Rock and the owner of the land slated to be leased for the Clinton Library. The landowner\'s lawyer charges that the current plans for the library, including a private residence, are outside the bounds of the stated plan for a public park. If the Supreme Court of Arkansas decides in favor of the landowner, the library could be \"delayed indefinitely.\" The Clinton Foundations\' plans for the land include an amphitheater and \"urban fishing grounds.\"

Scotland\'s National Library Overbooked

Scotland\'s National Library, unlike the Library of Congress, collects all the books and magazines published in the UK. So, it\'s no surprise that it is already outgrowing the extension built in 1984. Among the unusual items preserved at the library are an ancient Buddhist text and some of Robert Burns\' manuscripts. The Edinburgh Evening News Online has the full story.

Valuable books recovered from university fire

Charles Davis passed along This One on some valuable books and scientific equipment feared lost when fire swept through an historic university building have been saved.
Glasgow University had quite a fire, but recovered materials worth thousands of pounds, some of the materials recovered are damp and are being frozen at the university library.
Booksicles!

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Looking at weblogs

Over at LLRX there is an interesting feature by Cindy Curling, A Closer Look at Weblogs. It includes some background to the \'blog phenomenon, a look at different types of weblog as well as tips on creating your own. There is a list of recommended library-related weblogs (LISNews is not there but many of my other favourites are).

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