Students losing part-time home when main library locks doors

Wayne Risher from the Memphis, TN
Commercial
Appeal
news writes: \"Like it or not,
libraries
are
day cares, hangouts and meeting spots, as well as
places for bookish pursuits. \"

The Central Library will be closing for two months to
move to a new building. Parents and kids are having to
find other \"day care\" options. Day care centers have
noticed a slight increase in enrollment.

\"A couple of parents have told me they\'re signing up
because the library is closing,\" said Thomas. \"I think
we\'re going to get a lot.\"
Full Story

Anti-theft device needed for library books

This from Japan reporting that the Tottori
Prefectural Library was found to have lost 6400
volumes since it opened in 1990. In recent months
several libraries have reported losses. They are
considering installing a Book Detection
System.

The Asahi Shimbun reports:
\"The prefecture\'s administrative surveillance team
was brought in, with the governor\'s strict orders to get to
the bottom of the matter. Governor Yoshihiro Katayama
apologized in public for his own ``supervisory
oversight,\'\' and served a written warning to the chief
librarian.\"

Full Story

Price of access - Local libraries weigh use of Web filters, free speech

This article reports on the state of filtering in the
Eastern Shores Library System in Sheboygan County
WI. They say they will stop accepting e-rate grants
rather than add filters. They are trying other popular
monitoring techniques such as placing terminals near
reference desks and using time limits.

ANNE DAVIS of the Journal Sentinel writes:
\"Placement of the terminals was a key factor in the
library board\'s decision not to install filters, she
added.\"
Full Story

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The Web Can Shrink a Big World

From ALICE DuBOIS
at the New York Times
- A nice
synopsis in of internet search techniques, tools and
tips. With advice from librarian, Ms. Osofsky, from the
NYPL.

\"People think with the Internet, you push a button and
get an answer,\" says Marcia Osofsky, a librarian at the
New York Public Library telephone reference desk.\"

Full Story

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Last Longing Look at 5 Public Libraries

Baltimore citizens said a sad goodbye Saturday to five city libraries shuttered by budget cuts:

Yesterday, the last day in the lives of five city libraries, played to a small but sad audience.
As Carla D. Hayden, director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, made a farewell tour to thank librarians in all five branches she chose for closure, many people paid their last respects to beloved neighborhood beacons in all corners of Baltimore, from Pimlico to Fells Point.

One woman from far outside the city made a pilgrimage to her past . . . \"This was my childhood library,\" she said. \"I\'m a librarian because of it. I could walk here.\"

More from the Baltimore Sun.

S.C. libraries removing a few Internet filters

Just the other day this article
here
appeared about South Carolina ordering filters on library
computers. Guess what? The order said libraries had to
filter all BUT 10% of their computers. So now some library systems
have to take filters OFF of at least one computer to
comply with
the order. JESSICA FLATHMANN from the Charlotte
Observer says: \"Area public libraries are removing
pornography-blocking software from some of their Internet
computers because of a new state law.\" Full Story

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Mixed Feelings About A Legendary Library

Here\'s an entertaining commentary on the pros-and-cons of
Oxford University\'s somewhat archaic but venerable Bodleian Library:

I should mention that the library takes four to five hours to \"fetch\" a book from its stacks. Readers are advised to order what they need in the morning so they\'ll have it by afternoon. An all-morning wait should be enough to force a person into careful consideration. So why I ordered Universalis Arithmetica is a puzzler. This book is a ridiculously valuable first edition of a massively important work, true. Newton was still at Cambridge in 1707 when the Bodleian\'s edition was printed. . .

More from the National Post.

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New Study Finds Few Students Turning to Libraries

Unsurpisingly, a new study from the Pew Internet & American Life Project has found that the majority of students turn to the Web for assistance with their homework, bypassing libraries:

Seventy-one percent of middle school and high school students with Internet access said they relied on the electronic technology the most in completing a project, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. That compares to 24 percent who said they relied on libraries the most, according to the survey. . .

More from Reuters.

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A New Model for Scientific Publishing?

The Public Library of Science will soon launch several free online journals. These titles are intended to showcase the work of scientists participating in a boycott of publishers that do not place articles in the public domain within six months of publication:

Thousands of scientists around the world will soon be boycotting academic journals that refuse to make their contents freely available on the web soon after publication. The boycott could mean scientists refusing to submit papers to journals and refusing to review the work of their peers for any journal that does not deposit research papers into an online public library of science.

The group behind the online library is planning its own online journals to give scientists who join the boycott a forum for their work. . .

More from BBC News.

Associated Press: Quoting = Copyright Violation

In breaking news, The Associated Press has apparently begun leaning on About.com authors to stop using quotations from AP articles to guide their readers to the complete text as it appears on other sites.

In a message sent to all contributors, an About.com moderator wrote:

\"I have some bad news to convey to everyone - AP and other news services
have decided to be quite strict in how they interpret their copyrights.
Before, it was always assumed to be OK if we just quoted a couple of
sentences from a news story and then provided a link - it was copying all or
most of a story which we had to avoid.
But not any more. Quoting even one sentence, if it conveys the gist of the entire story, isn\'t something that they want to permit now. They are serious about this. They have already been in contact with About over Guides who have done nothing more than quote the first couple of lines
on their sites, along with a link back to the full story.\"

About.com seems ready to knuckle-under D.M.C.A-style, and I can only imagine \'blogs will be the next target.

More information is available at Politech.

Bush Delays Release of Reagan Records Again

The Associated Press reports:

For the third time, the Bush administration has delayed release of 68,000 pages of Ronald Reagan\'s White House records, including vice presidential papers from President Bush\'s father. The papers were to have come out in January, 12 years after Reagan left office as provided under law. The White House delayed the release to June 21, then to the last day in August.

On Friday, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales sought a third extension, this time with no deadline, so the administration can review the records and consult representatives of former presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton . . . ``I think it\'s a scandal to hold them back,\'\' Anna Nelson, a historian at American University, said Friday. ``I think the whole point of the Presidential Records Act is to open documents. It goes against the spirit of the law.\'\'

More via the New York Times.

Copywrong

Salon has a Story on the U.S. Copyright Office report giving the Digital Millennium Copyright Act a passing grade.

\"Libraries could not exist without first sale. If they had to get permission or pay a fee every time they lent a copy of a book, they would have to stop lending. There would be no functional difference between a public library and a Barnes and Noble.


It\'s no secret that some big publishers have been waging commercial and legislative war on libraries for some years now. These publishers see every use of interlibrary loan as a lost sale. And the DMCA is a big ICBM in that war. These publishers would like nothing better than to be able to dictate the terms of use in libraries. And by moving all their content to digital streams, encrypted, tethered to specific devices and controlled by restrictive contracts, they can effectively squeeze libraries to death.\"

Topic: 

Regulating Minors\' Access to the Internet Can Backfire

Bob Cox passed along This One from SfGate that talks about the Child Internet Protection Act. This one comes down solidly against filtering, and says filters tend to block sites in a way ACLU representative Emily Whitfield describes as \"capricious.\" One interesting note in this story, the privately run Waldorf schools refuse to allow their under-12 students to use computers or television.

\"We\'re not concerned with online content. Instead, we believe that children should be free to develop their imaginations, and we feel the Internet provides prepackaged information that makes kids passive. Plus, we feel that physical activity leads to healthier minds. Sitting in front of a computer, pointing and clicking, is not a picture that we support as leading to later health.\"

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Libraries ordered to filter Web in South Carolina

APRIL SIMUN from The State newspaper writes: \"The S.C. State Library board voted 5-0 Thursday to comply with a new state law requiring them to filter their own computers and to withhold money from local public libraries that don\'t filter.\" Full Story

And Annalee Newitz from the San Francisco Gate writes: \"...many experts and activists say our current methods for regulating kids\' access to the Internet, like blocking, are worse than useless.\" Full Story

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Kansas City - We\'re all going to read a book

MIKE HENDRICKS from the Kansas City Star reports that \"KC loves this idea\" of the city reading the same book at the same time.

\"My phone has been ringing off the hook from Kansas City Metropolitan Library & Information Network members asking if and how we will be participating in this project,\" wrote Susan Burton, executive director of that group of 76 area library systems.
Full Story

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County library patrons doing a cushy job

Are comfy chairs an issue at your library?

Patti Brandt from the Bay City Times writes about the selection of chairs at the Bay County Library System:

\"Staff members there have been asking visitors for the last week or so to rate six different chairs on size, comfort and eye appeal...Thomas Birch, managing librarian of the Bay City Branch, said choosing a chair is a very subjective matter.\"Full Story

Home alone — and at the library alone

An editorial in the Seattle Times says:

\"Libraries are icons of our sense of community. They\'ve long been seen as safe havens where adults and children spend hours immersed in books, maps and videos.

Now they want to limit children. It\'s not that libraries don\'t want children.\" It calls for more common sense and less rules. Full Editorial

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Oppose Expanded Government Secrecy!

Amy Kearns writes \"I got this alert from the ACLU!
TAKE ACTION! SEND A FREE FAX IN JUST TWO CLICKS! TO OPPOSE EXPANDED GOVERNMENT SECRECY!
You can read more and send a FREE FAX from the action alert Here


Last year, with little debate and no public hearings, Congress adopted an intelligence authorization bill that contained a provision to criminalize all leaks of classified information. A firestorm of criticism from civil libertarians, major news organizations, academics and LIBRARIANS resulted and President Bill Clinton vetoed the bill. Unfortunately, at the request of Senator Richard Shelby (R- AL), this year\'s intelligence authorization bill may include the identical provision.
\"

Separating Students From Smut

Wired has a rather indepth Look at Filtering and CIPA. They say 75 percent of schools use filtering already.

\"We believe schools should be a safe haven for children –- a place for children to learn and grow, not cesspools for the destruction of the minds and souls of children,\" said Kristen Schultz, a legal policy analyst with the Family Research Council.

Seems as though the internet is still the least of most peoples worries:


\"We have far more complaints about written materials like certain classics, novels, and plays than anything having to do with Internet resources.\"

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125 years later, Twain fans end a story

Someone writes \"the USAToday is running a Story story on Mark Twain\'s unpublished \"blindfold novelette\" entitled \"A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage\". The summer issue of The Atlantic Monthly ran it, and the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library launched a writing contest to finish the mystery that drew 730 entries from as far as Japan and Australia. The winners will be announced Oct. 13.
\"

Topic: 

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