Librarian And Information Science News

Filtering Quickies

These links have been sitting around on my computer for too long now....

nofilters.org is the website for a new grassroots campaign by library workers and patrons to keep filtering out of libraries and to remove censorware from libraries that have been forced to install it.

Family Friendly Libraries which is is now under the management of Citizens for Community Values. Pro-Filtering.

Safeguarding the Wired Schoolhouse says Each school, school district or educational network is best equipped to evaluate its own needs, and the site helps school leaders understand the issues involved in managing Internet content.

And last but not least is Filtereality a site that is intended to be used as a tool by librarians, library board members, and others who seek reliable information about the constitutional implications of using Internet filtering software in public libraries.

Deputy mayor sacked over net porn. One man who wishes he had used filters.

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Nude Library in Australia

Laurie writes \"Check out this library in Australia
weeklyworldnews.com has the Story \"

Seems almost impossible, but they say it was started by a billionaire nudest who loved \"great literature and romping through life with no clothes on\".

\"And in his will, he set aside 5 percent of his estate to establish the Sawyer Franzline Library - - his only condition being that anyone who works in the library or uses the library be stone-cold naked. In his mind, he was doing people a favor by setting them free of their clothes.\"

Five Days at your desk

Lee Hadden writes:\"A 30 year veteran proofreader for a publisher was known for his
dedication to work. He came in first each morning, and stayed late each
night. Sadly, George Turklebaum died at his desk at a New York publisher,
and it was five days before anyone noticed that he was dead in his cubicle.
It was the cleaning staff who first noticed he hadn\'t moved, and not his
co-workers of many years.
The Guardian in England has picked up the story.

Certainly, this lonely death could never happen to dedicated
librarians. Could it?\"

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These Emerging Technologies Will Change Public Libraries

John Guscott, Editor of Library Futures Quarterly has written a Feature on crucial technologies that public library administrators, trustees, managers and professionals should be watching. He covers technologies like Information Devices, Language and Translation Software, Wireless Networking, and Information Management, to name just a few.

\"These new technologies will challenge libraries to address essential transformational issues including enhancing convenience and expediency, providing varying and overlapping information formats, extending operating hours and points-of-service, addressing permanency of materials, serving broader constituencies, managing costs of services and even testing the essential right to loan materials.\"

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Share Your Library Dreams Win Gold

The Shylibrarian is having a Library Dream Contest.

Report your LIBRARY DREAM or NIGHTMARE to THE SHY LIBRARIAN and The BEST LIBRARY DREAM or NIGHTMARE, as judged by The Shy Librarian staff,
will be awarded a 14-karat gold coin commemorating the 125th anniversary
of the Canadian Library of Parliament.Not a bad deal.

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Extending to the Internet

A Nice Story from Infotoday on how libraries need to use and improve their Internet presence. Your libraries web site can be used as a portal to guide your patrons to the information they need, and that makes a good first impression, and brings your patrons back for more!

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No more Prison Libraries in WA?

Holly Blosser writes \"Washington Gov. Gary Locke is proposing abolishing law libraries in correction facilities to save money. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has this article
about it. This would place all the burden on the Washington State Law Library, and they definitely don\'t have the resources to handle these requests. Doesn\'t make much sense to me, and I think there will be much opposition to this plan (or I hope so, at least).
\"

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Maine special collections in the news

Deb Rollins writes \"

\"Digging Through Maine\'s Closet\", starting with Edna St. Vincent Millay\'s nightgown! Focuses on some special collections in southern Maine, from the Maine Times weekly newspaper... \"

They cover Collections of historic records and other materials all over the great state of Maine.

Filter law a trial for libraries

MY SA.com has a Story that I would imagine speaks for most libraries being affected by CIPA.

\"\"There are a lot of gray areas that have yet to be resolved about this law,\" said Laura Isenstein, director of the San Antonio Library. \"From what we understand there are several organizations that say they will be filing lawsuits about it. We don\'t know what\'s going to happen with those suits, and it\'s a possibility it could affect how the law will be enacted. Right now, it\'s too early to say.\"

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Library skills in transition

Gordon Dunsire has written a Nice Piece that appears in Impact. Here\'s the intro....

\"This article will present some personal observations of the impact of information technology on the traditional skills of librarians, drawn from experiences in the higher education sector and tainted by an obsessive interest in cataloguing. I believe that the development of information processing and communication technologies has had, is having, and will continue to have, such a profound influence on library and information services that all other factors such as finance and costs, politics, social expectations and management styles pale into insignificance.\"

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The Impact of Computers on Schools

Donna Sent along this Story from Tech Source on The Impact of Computers on Schools. It talks about Donald Tapscot\'s \"Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation\" and \"Failure to Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children’s Minds—for Better and Worse\" by Jane Healy. Two books that took 2 very different looks at the computer and it\'s affects on schools.

\"The thrill of using technology in the classroom is compelling. However, it must be tempered by concern for productive use and an awareness of the possible negative effects of computers on young learners. Keeping students’ physical well-being in mind, teachers must carefully arrange computers in the classroom (taking ergonomics into account) and set time limits for computer use. An informed, balanced approach to technology infusion is key, and Tapscott and Healy\'s books are a must-read for all willing to reengineer themselves for 21st-century education.\"

Librarians vigilant after rare-book thefts

Bob Cox sent in another Book Theft Story. As rare books get rarer, libraries become targets.

\"Libraries are really sitting ducks, as lay people become aware of how much some of their things might be worth,\" said Ken Sanders, security committee chairman for the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America.

AAP Wants No Fair Use

This Story from The Washington Post should scare you.

It\'s a story about Patricia Schroeder (president of the Washington- and New York-based Association of American Publishers) and she says the AAP should \"have a very serious issue with librarians.\"

She says publishers do not believe that the public should have the same fair use rights in the electronic world as the prit world and the AAP is looking for ways to charge library patrons for information.

LC expropriates CPUSA Docs

The Library of Congress has recovered a large number of documents of the Communist Party of the United States which were taken to the Soviet Union for safe-keeping during the Cold War. The problem is, they didn\'t consult the still-existing Communist Party about the colletion of documents. The CP, naturally, is interested in gaining access to its own documents and would like to keep them in its own archive. They weren\'t even consulted about the creation of the access tool for the documents. Mark Rosenzweig, who is the librarian at the Reference Center for Marxist Studies, has written an open letter to the LC about the issue. It can be found in the latest issue of Library Juice, along with some discussion and LC\'s original press release.

Worthless Study Proves Nothing

I post this one, more to comment on the story, not to report any findings.
This Story was picked up and reported on by about everyone.
A preliminary study of 150 people aged 20 to 35 has shown that more than one in 10 are suffering from severe problems with their memory.
Tiny study, actually, not even a study, a preliminary study, shows some people are stupid, and all of a sudden this is the headline I read... \"Computer-mad generation has a memory crash\" There are so many things wrong with this story I will not waste my time with it.

Please read the entire story critically, and make up your own mind.

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Library rankings stir some debate

Occasional LISNews contributor Thomas Hennen also does his Hennen\'s American Public Library Ratings that are often discussion in the press after they come out.

JS Online has a In Depth look at the Ratings, and includes an interview with Thomas.

\"There\'s a whole group of people who don\'t want to measure or compare anything because if we compare, we\'ll hurt each other\'s feelings,\" Hennen said. \"I\'ve never said this is the only way to evaluate libraries.\"

Boston Public Library Long Range Plan

Don Saklad writes \"Boston Public Library makes available the Long Range Plans after years of keeping public participation at too long an arms reach. by censoring BPL documentation

\"

Library thefts uncovered

Bob Cox sent in this Pioneer Planet Story on the big find of Hundreds (over 800)of books missing from Twin Cities libraries in a mans home. The police expect to seek felony theft charges against 36-year-old man. In one case he checked out every copy of an aquarium book carried at three Dakota County libraries, using different names. Full Story

``His reading tastes were rather eclectic,\'\' said Roseanne Byrne, assistant director of the Dakota County library system. ``I think he probably was playing a wonderful game, a complicated game, and wanted to see how far it would go for whatever reason.\'\'

Precursors of Search Engines

Always Helpful Brian from Librarism.com writes \" Knowledge Management magazine has an Article which discusses DDC as a paper filing system and makes suggestions for the indexing of e-docs. \"

They close with an interesting thought:

\"One lesson from the past, however, is still an important one. We should be reluctant to accept any sort of closed classification system in a world as full of change as ours is. We should use technology not as an excuse to create a single new system but as a way to gain access under as many systems as possible.\"

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Image Search Engines

The February edition of the CPL Internet Gazette is online now!! Don\'t forget to sign up for the mailing list. This month, the articles include Image Search Engines, Black History Month, and more. Here is the article on Image Search Engines.\"Many of the search engine companies have begun to apply multimedia capabilities to their repertoire. AltaVista, Go, Excite , Fast, and Yahoo have all started offering this service, with no doubt more to be added in the future. There are web sites out there, however, whose primary duty is searching for images. Besides the web sites mentioned above, this article will discuss two of these sites as well as a fee-based database entitled The Associated Press Archive, which we subscribe to here in Suffolk County.\"

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