Are You Intolerant?

While I anxiously await issue #5 of The Intolerant Librarian you can check out issues 1-4. With headlines like these, you know it\'s good!

\"ALA Expects controversy over new JK Rowling Book: Harry Potter and the Magical Dancing Penis \"


\"Bookmobile 2000 Kills Commies, Spreads Literacy.\"


\"Stupid Librarian almost ruins Frat Party.


And My Favorite:

\"\"Intolerant Librarian\" now listed on Infoseek, Thus Assuring It Will Never be Found.\"

www.virtue.nu/intlibrarian

The Skeptical Internet User Does Not Search

Here\'s an interesting one from interactionarchitect.com on how \"skeptical Internet users\" are using the internet. Skeptical Internet Users are those who are motivated by the Internet\'s promise of offering value, not by how cool it is. They don\'t use search engines, that is too much work, they just check out a few web sites regularly. They are unforgicing and ready to never visit your site again! Sounds like they need to visit a library and ask for some help!

G&B Sues to Silence Critics

Bob Cox sent in this Story from Linguafrance.com.

In 1988 Henry H. Barschall did a study that found nonprofit society-based journals offered work equal to or better than commercial journals, and are cheaper. Commercial publisher Gordon & Breach didn\'t like what was said, and has filed suite. Gordon & Breach has now spent millions of dollars and eleven years pressing a false-advertising claim against two nonprofit competitors.

\"Has pursuing a course of continuous litigation against both the scientific and the academic library communities hurt business for G&B\'s journals? \"Probably it has,\" Gordon admits. But, he adds, \"it\'s impossible to see how it has. As you know, library budgets have been cut in the last few years.\" \"

SUNY\'s Library-Software Contract Includes Code

The Chronicle has a Story on a contract the State University of New York signed with Ex-Libris. The contract requires Ex-Libris to place in escrow a complete copy of the software source code and all related documentation. That means SUNY can look at the source code and documentation for the company\'s library-management system. Sounds like a good move.

Who Organizes The Web?

Webgrrls.com has a rather interesting Story on the library profession.

\"Having abandoned the \"book ghetto\" and the image of glasses and hair buns, librarians have commercialized on their ability to manage knowledge and information. Today\'s librarians are more commonly known as cybrarians, content managers, information specialists, and knowledge engineers. \"

Library to halt sale of historic journals

Charles Davis writes \"The British Library has suspended sales of historic newspapers after a public outcry.
It had disposed of up to 60,000 bound volumes of newspapers in
unpublicised deals in the past four years. All the newspapers were foreign.
The library said it had not broken its legal obligation to collect and maintain
British printed material.
The library, caught out by the controversy, said yesterday that it would make
no further disposals until it had undertaken \"a complete review of microfilm copies\". The recent disposals include long runs of newspapers from most
European countries, the United States, Latin America and pre-revolutionary
Russia.
Story from \"Daily Telegraph\" 24 November 2000
http://www.telegraph.co.uk -- Read More

Microsoft Spends $5 Million on Chile

Bill Gates is giving $5 Million dollars get libraries in Chile hooked up to the Internet. Chile was chosen because of it has a history of open access. Read the full story from the Seattle Times.\"The program, announced Tuesday, would put an estimated 1,200 computers in the libraries and would pay for librarians\' Internet training. Microsoft Corp., which Bill Gates co-founded in 1975, will separately give $1.2 million in software.\" -- Read More

Rare Book Library Rarely Used!!

The University of Pennsylvania Libraries just got their 5 millionth volume, a rare hagadah. Unfortunately, their rare book collection is underutilized by the student body. What is so special about a rare book collection if nobody uses it. Excite has the story.\"Like the rest of Penn\'s unusual or uncommon 250,000 printed books, over 10,000 linear feet of manuscript collections, and more than 1,500 codex manuscripts -- many one-of-a-kind maps, broadsides, playbills, programs, photographs, prints, drawings and sound recordings -- are housed in the collection. And in about 10 minutes, you or any other Penn student can sit down, request and read from the same copy of Paradise Lost that Milton once held in his own hands or browse through its recently acquired hagadah.\" -- Read More

Understaffing in Ontario’s Elementary School Libraries

The CLA is Reporting on a staff shortage across the river in Ontario. Ontario’s elementary school libraries are so understaffed that many are open only five hours per week.

\"The results of the survey, which has been conducted annually since 1998, show that the number of libraries in Ontario staffed by teacher-librarians has declined by 15 per cent over the last three years (for more details, see (The Report). And according to the report, constraints in the provincial funding formula have caused a number of boards to eliminate teacher-librarians altogether. Not surprisingly, the survey also found that the trend toward volunteer staffing of libraries has continued.\"

Ontario, Canada, that is. It\'s lovely this time of year.

Support for Software Law Eroding

The LA Times has a Story on UCITA. It seems support for the law is quickly eroding as folks find out what the law means for them.

\"Arne Larsen, director of information systems at Horizon Blue Cross in Newark, N.J., said his company\'s software buyers have already rejected one contract clause that would have invoked UCITA and will keep on fighting it when it reappears. \"

Can a library oversee a Museum?

Someone writes \"Can a library system oversee a \'Contemporary Art\' museum? It looks like the University of Arizona is trying to figure this out:


The Wildcat from the U of Arizona has a
Story on by a decison to keep The Center for Creative Photography under contol of university libraries.

Some say that its function as a museum would best be served if \"liberated from control of the university library system\".

I like that term \"liberated\", like it\'s being held hostage.

The Snarky Librarian

Are You a Snarky Librarian?:

Hate your job?
Hate your coworkers?
Wish you\'d taken a completely different career track that did not involve dealing with books and/or the public?
Read the letters in American Libraries and wonder why these people bother?
Attend a professional conference and pretend you\'re not a librarian?
Look at your library school classmates and think about how annoying they are?
Fantasize about your supervisor\'s going-away party?

You sound Snarky to me!
Check out The Snarky Librarian.

Shaking Things Up

Jessamyn West (the New Jessamyn West, editor of librarian.net, not the famous author) recently did a guest column in Marylaine Block\'s Ex Libris e-zine entitled SHAKING THINGS UP: PROGRESSIVE AND RADICAL LIBRARIANS.

Marylaine introduced the column this way:

\"I asked Jessamyn West, who calls herself an anarchist librarian, to explain for me and my readers the variety of views and organizations on the leftward fringes of our profession. Trust me, nobody who reads this will ever again think librarians are sweet little ladies in sensible shoes.\"

InfoEthics 2000 Conference Papers

UNESCO just had its INFOETHICS 2000 conference in Paris, the Third UNESCO Congress on Ethical, Legal and Social Challenges of Cyberspace. A number of papers are available from the conference, some in English. They are available here. The list of papers is as follows:


The information society and the expectation revolution
by David Konzevik


The changing shape of information and the role of government
by Thomas B. Riley


Public sector information initiatives in the European Union
by George Papapavlou


Access to information and \"public domain\" in the post-\"perestroyka\" Russia: a paradoxal experience.
by Ekaterina U.Genieva


Access to telecommunications in the internet age
Arthur Levin


Accessibility to rural and remote areas
by Yasuhiko Kawasumi

Networks and information services: government policy
by Jean-Noël Tronc


Fair use and access to information in the digital era
by Carlos M. Correa


Copyright and its limitations in the digital environment
by Bernt Hugenholtz


How Can Fair Use Doctrine Be Applied For the Appropriate Level of Copyright Protection in the Global Marketplace?
by Euisun Yoo

Preserving fair use in the digital age
by Barry Steinhardt


Copyright and the freedom of accessing information in the cyberspace
by Andras Szinger


Ten commandments to protect privacy in the Internet world
by Hansjuergen Garstka


The legal protection of the right of privacy on the networks
by Amr Zaki Abdel Motaal


The future of privacy : David and Goliath revisited
by Simon Davis


Human dignity in the cyberspace society
by Adama Fofana


Interception capabilities 2000
by Duncan Campbell


Once again, the papers are at http://webworld.unesco.org/infoethics2000/papers.html.

E-Learning a Booming Business

I thought that this piece from Hoovers might be of interest. The number of digital textbooks continue to grow at as fast a rate as the distance learning environments. In fact...\"according to International Data Corporation, the number of students enrolled in e-learning courses is growing 30% annually and will reach 2.2 million college students in 2002. Additionally, over 80% of all higher education institutions will be offering e-learning by 2002.\" -- Read More

More Ghost Stories

Where was this one from Oregon Live 3 weeks ago during halloween?\"She\'s described as a loving woman who liked to dress in blue. Nobody knows much about her, except that she was a dedicated librarian in Snohomish in the 1920s and \'30s.

So dedicated that some think she\'s still there.\" -- Read More

Bring out the Reading Mobile

The Baltimore Sun has this story about a bookmobile that promotes reading by find those that don\'t go to the library.\"Harford County Public Library officials have rolled out their latest effort to reach children sometimes left on the sidelines when it comes to library use, launching a $135,000 vehicle dubbed \"Rolling Reader\" and packed with computers, Internet connections and more than 3,000 books.\" -- Read More

E-Mail Makes the World Go \'Round

Computers In Libraries has a nice Story by D. Scott Brandt on the use of eMail in libraries. He talks about how librarians use eMail to make friends and help patrons.

\"E-mail technology really enables librarians to have all sorts of relationships with patrons from around the world.\"

Not a Prophesy

Bob Kaehr writes:

When in the not-too-distant future (five-to-10 years) nearly all
books and periodicals become digital and libraries become archives, what
will happen to academic (even school, public and special) library personnel?
Will libraries be taken over or delivered into the hands of information
services? Will there be mass dismissals of traditional \"book people\"? Oh,
that\'s right, we\'ll just re-train? :>} Will faculty, who can teach \"library
exercises\" from within the classroom (e.g. How to Use Information
Databases), need traditional BI? Will there need to be circulation
personnel other than a clerk and a few aids to charge and discharge those
oldies but goodies? Will for-profit companies become the selectors for the
various publics by virtue of the collections they are able to offer?

Continued... -- Read More

New network links libraries online

This News.com Story on The Collaborative Digital Reference Service (CDRS) is quite interesting. The trial run began Friday, about 60 libraries took questions from library patrons. The first question sent through CDRS came from a library in England and was answered in Santa Monica, CA. The question asked for the most recent books published in English about ancient Byzantine cuisine.

\"Rather than watch idly as Internet companies like AskJeeves, Google or Yahoo fill the void, librarians believe their expertise, research collections and specialized catalogs not available on the Internet enable them to answer questions quickly and completely--for free.\" -- Read More

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