American Kids and the Net

Here is a short release on a study done that took a look at how kids are doing on the net.

\"New research on Internet usage among teens and young adults in 16 countries shows that while American youth spend more time online than kids elsewhere do, they are also more likely to have their parents monitor what they see and set limits on where they go. Conversely, youth in Europe spend less time online but have fewer restrictions on what they can see and do. These results emerge from Ipsos-Reid\'s The Face of the Web: Youth – a 16-country study of Internet users between the ages of 12 and 24.\"

P2P Quickies

A trio of stories on Peer to Peer sharing [aka P2P, not to be confused with B2B, B2C or Y2K].


This one from Wired talks about how a new company, CareScience, is working to set up a P2P exchange for medical records.

Salon has One on PopularPower, and the emerging P2P business world. There are several companies hoping to make some money off of the latest internet buzz words.
If none of that made any sense, read This One, a nice look at what P2P is all about.

There may come a day when ILL is done like this.

Rare 3rd Candidate for ALA President

It happens infrequently, but it has happened before. Occassionally a third candidate enters the race for ALA President. Occassionally, that third canididate has also won. This year Maurice (Mitch) Freedman is running, in addition to Ken Haycock and William Sannwald. ALA put out a press release announcing Mitch\'s candidacy. The text of his campaign flyer is inside, if you want to read further. -- Read More

Information Services for Higher Ed.: A New Competitive Space

Carol Ann Hughes, the head of collections at Questia.com, has a new article out in Dlib called Information Services for Higher Education
A New Competitive Space
. She writes, \"Any organization that undertakes an educational mission in our society is now and will increasingly be surrounded by alternative information service suppliers ... it is likely that ... alternatives will come from the for-profit sector.\"

More on Information Architecture

I sometimes like to pretend I\'m an Information Architect, like George liked to pretend he was an architect on Seinfeld.

R. E. Wyllys has posted a lesson that talks about how Information Architecture and Library Science. To paraphrase the lesson:

It provides information about various ideas associated with the term \"information architecture\" shows how information architecture is closely related to, and embodies most of, the long-standing principles of library and information science.


Check it out at U of Texas

Filtering the filters

Likely to take some bite out of the new laws being passed, peacefire has released a program that can shut off all of the major filtering programs.


ZD Net has a Story or you can download it at peacefire.org.

\"The porn industry in this instance really loves (it), It\'s a shame for kids and parents. It\'s a reason why Congress keeps passing laws.\" -Bruce Taylor of the National Law Center for Children and Families

Filters Forced By Law

The fallout over the Children\'s Internet Protection Act continues here in the U.S.
Wired has a Story\"This is the first time since the development of the local, free public library in the 19th century that the federal government has sought to require censorship in every town and hamlet in America,\" said Greg Hansen, an ACLU attorney, in a statement.\"


One more story can be found at ZD Net

I Spy

Competitive intelligence according to Janelle Brown is a growing but terribly dull profession.[more]

Although the plot may not be as action-packed as the reviewer would have liked, the new book from Adam Penenberg and Marc Barry\'s,\"Spooked: Espionage in Corporate America,\" may still prove interesting to the serious corporate librarian.

Organize This!

Her company is called \'The Organized Library\' and Judith Tapiero makes a living out of managing corporate information chaos.[more]

Catch this article from 1099 the magazine for the independent professional. Yet another example of what the innovative librarian can do in the age of information overload.

Results of Web Proxy Use in Libraries

Peter Murray writes \"Last month a call for participation was posted to several mailing lists for a survey on
web proxy use in libraries. A report based on survey responses is now available at:
pandc.org/proxy/survey/report.html


Seventy-four responses came in from the survey. By far, the most popular use of
proxy servers in libraries is for remote resource access. The turn-key solution
EZproxy was by far the most popular, followed by Innovative\'s Web Access
Management product and the freely available Squid and Apache proxy servers.


Proxies for filtering and proxies for bandwidth conservation are equally popular
reasons in libraries. Microsoft Proxy server is a popular package for these
uses, but a wide variety of software packages are in use. Proxy servers are
also being used to gather statistics on resource use.

The report has numerous anecdotes and information from specific libraries,
including URLs to user documentation, description of systems, and software
packages.


Interested in adding your own library\'s experiences to the report? You can
still take the survey at the URL below; I\'ll periodically recompile the
responses and update the report:
pandc.org/proxy/survey/survey.html \"

Congress Passes Labor HHS Education Appropriations Bill

Congress Passes Labor HHS Education Appropriations Bill with Filtering Rider Attached


In a 292 to 60 vote, the House of Representatives has passed the Labor HHS Education Appropriations Bill (HR 4577) with the McCain- Santorum-Istook-Pickering Internet filtering rider attached. The Senate also passed the bill with a voice vote (no voting numbers available).


The filtering rider mandates that libraries and schools use valuable resources to install and maintain unreliable Internet filters, or be stripped of key federal funding. With this bill, the federal government has seized control over families and communities and blocked their power to make decisions about the ways they protect their children.


From the ALA

Library Cats

Susan Hill writes \"Greetings! Our library recently was moved in upon by a Mama Cat and her five kittens. All five kittens have been adopted, but Mama remains. Cats in public libraries are not a new phenomenon. In fact, there is a web site devoted to the literary feline.


Thought this might be a fun time to take a break from it all and have fun with some library kitties.\"


You can check out a pic of her cat, and the rest of the story, below. Feel free to ad your own! -- Read More

The Great Hunt

How are the the strategies you use when you surf the Web similiar to the ones hunter-gatherers used to find food? [more].

This is the intriguing question posed by New Scientist in this article by Rachel Chalmers, \'Surf Like A Bushman\'.

What of Old Books?

Here\'s a short but sweet Story from Feedmag on our love / hate relationship with \"Old Books\". They call the LOC plan to digitize all it\'s books a \"fit of visionary enthusiasm\", and raise some interesting questions on the rush to digitize everything.

\"How much difference is there, really, between revering old books simply because they\'re old and ignoring them for the same reason?\"

Writers\' Rights on Net All Right

Wired has a Story on Featurewell.com, a site the creator says, could help redefine how people organize for their rights via the Web.

\"Writers\' freedom is often associated with causes such as Salman Rushdie, or cases of censorship in Africa and the developing world. But I argue that writers\' freedom is also the power to control the dissemination of your work.\"

The State of the GLF

LISNews is one of my hobbies, one of my other hobbies is
Investing. The Nasdaq Market has had a rough few months, and
Microsoft is a big part of that market. I\'ve been hearing
alot of talk about all the money being lost in the market,
which got me to thinking....


The Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation
has been a huge supporter of libraries around
the world.


Bill Gates set up the GLF, in part, with money made from
microsoft.


The GLF gave almost $35 Million to libraries last year. The
GLF paid almost $24 Million in Taxes last year (Still think
the rich are undertaxed?).


So now that Microsoft stock has gone from 119 to 47 (They
lost over 11% on Friday alone) what will become of the fund?
With libraries being a small part (1%) of the fund
distributions, will this money begin to shrink?


Can anyone shed some light on this for me? I\'m curious about
the status of the fund as I\'m a big fan of the fund and what
they do.

Opposing Copyright Extension

Dennis S. Karjala a Professor of Law @ Arizona State
University has put together a good resource for all those
interested in Copyright Law. Check Out His
Site
.

\"On October 7, 1998, both the House and the Senate
passed S. 505, the \"Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension
Act,\"extending the already-too-long term of copyright
protection by another 20 years. The legislation purports to
cover even works already in existence--a windfall gift to
special interests of what rightfully belongs to the public.
Our President, a self-proclaimed supporter of the little
guy, signed the bill on October 27, 1998. Like the Congress,
President Clinton has sold out the interests of the American
people to a few owners of valuable copyrights from the
1920\'s and 1930\'s. This web site shows how and why this
action was a tragic mistake. It also supplies news on a
judicial challenge to the constitutionality of the term
extension legislation, and contains materials opposing
longer copyright terms generally in the hope that, when this
issue arises again (around the year 2015 or so), those
seeking to defend the public interest will have some
ammunition.\"

The Grinch steals the classroom

Bob Cox writes:
Only a Liberryian.....


A Nice Story about a Liberryian who got all
dressed up as \"The Grinch\". \'Tis the season, after
all.

\"It takes an hour-and-a-half, but today, I got it down
to an hour and 10 minutes,\" he said. \"And then when I get
home, it\'s another hour to get it all off.\"

ALA Midwinter Conference

I have noticed that some LISNews readers consider ALA hopelessly lost and characterize it as wasting its time with issues like the Boy Scouts. I wonder how much these folks actually know about the American Library Association and what it does.


Readers may be interested in knowing about what ALA has planned for the upcoming Midwinter conference. The Midwinter conference is smaller than the annual conference and mostly focuses on business meetings of the various units and committees, but there are also some events that give a flavor for what ALA is doing. Read on for a recent news release describing what is going on at the ALA Midwinter conference next January. -- Read More

Information Experts in the Info Age

Information Experts in the Information Age is the name of a report from the Labor Department\'s \"Occupational Outlook
Quarterly\". They have many kind things to say about librarians and the work we do.

It\'s a PDF so you\'ll need Acrobat.

\"

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