Librarian And Information Science News

UCITA on legislative agenda in four states

UCITA was passed in Maryland and Virginia last year, things are only getting worse, Arizona, Oklahoma, Delaware, and Texas are scheduled to take up the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA) this year. UCITA is opposed by leading bar associations, the attorneys general of more than 20 states, consumer groups, and everyone else with more than 2 active brain cells. CNN has the Full Story.

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Open Science Online

The American Prospect has a Story on PubMed Central and The open-source approach to publishing on the internet.

\"The open-source business model takes explicit advantage of this dynamic. So could biomedicine. As digital networks develop, the role of the major medical journals as the exclusive purveyors of certain kinds of data may well become obsolete, but their role in framing and interpreting the data will be ever more in demand.\"

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Sales Tax Free PC Week May Narrow Info Gap

Because New York is lagging behind the rest of the country in the number of homes with computers, ranking 34th in the nation, legislators are expected to vote on whether to accept a proposal to allow PCs to be sold tax free for one week during the month of August.

According to Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno, \"Over the past decade, personal computers have become a necessity in the household and knowledge of computers and their use is now considered essential for anyone seeking to excel in an increasingly technology-based economy.\" This 8% reduction in total cost, combined with anticipated promotional offers from vendors would provide a hefty price break for many.

If passed, it is hoped that the $20 million proposal would boost computer sales as well as increase computer literacy. Included in the tax break would be desktops and laptops, printers, scanners, CD-ROM drivers and software. All items must be purchased in a single transaction along with the PC.

New York would be the second state to adopt such a strategy. Pennsylvania tried this same approach last year, causing computer sales to triple. No information is available yet on whether the measure improved the IT literacy rate in that state.

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URLs Just Fade Away...

Lee Hadden writes:
\" A new study by Philip Davis and Suzanne Cohen of Cornell studied the
citation use of undergraduate students in Economics 101 over a period of
three years, 1996-1999. They found that most of the URLs are no longer
effective; that the use of printed book citations have dropped from 30% to
19%; that there has been a substantial increase in the use of popular,
un-referreed materials such as newspaper articles has increased from 7 to
19%, and that web citations have increased from 9 to 21%. Effectively,
scholarly use of library materials have dropped in favor of web-based
services available in the rooms of students. There is a need for college
professors to insist on greater use of refereed and academic resources by
their students.

Their research will be printed in a forthcoming article in the Journal
of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS), due Feb. 15, Vol.
52 (4). Read more about it- a preprint of the article is available at:
people.cornell.edu/pages/pmd8

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Censoring the Internet Won\'t Protect Kids

Marty Klein, a sex therapist in California has written this wonderful editorial on internet filters and CIPA. One of his points is that the government keeps passing laws that they think will protect our children, but to no avail.\"Today, public policy about children is driven by fear: of violence, drugs, the media, sexuality. The American public has rolled back many of its rights in the name of protecting its children-a policy that has failed to deliver the safety we long for. We seem to believe that emotional security lies with just one more law, or one new invention. Or with a little more money. Correctly reading the public\'s attitudes, politiciansdevelop increasingly extreme \"solutions\" for problems that are moral, spiritual and existential. But life just doesn\'t work that way.\"

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ALA and ACLU to Challenge Fed\'s Collection of Data on Kids\' Surfing Habits

From Newsbytes via The
Washington Post

comes this one with more on the Defense
Department\'s collection of data on the surfing habits of
schoolchildren. Advocacy groups are wanting to know
what the intentions of the government are [more...]

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Another E-book Story

Here is another story on e-books from Access Magazine. It states that e-books will become an additional form of reading, and will not replace the printed word...Gutenberg would be proud, or would he?\"First, let\'s trash the idea that e-books represent the final chapter in the history of the printed word. E-books will not replace the warm, tactile paper tomes we like to curl up with in bed or on the beach -- at least not anytime soon.\"

Holden Caufield Turns 50

CNN.COM has a Story on \'Catcher in the Rye\'.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of J.D. Salinger\'s \"The Catcher in the Rye.\"

\"My wish is for all of you to someday read \'The Catcher in the Rye,\'All of my efforts will now be devoted toward this goal, for this extraordinary book holds many answers.\"
-Mark David Chapman\"

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Questioning the Newberry List

E.J. Graff Has Written an interesting look at The Newberry\'s on Salon.
he says the Newbery medal treated as nearly infallible, the Newbery medalists as the \"boring\" books, the same books that stayed on display at the library because no one checked them out. No one who reads for pleasure and challenge and joy would willingly subject themselves to such demeaningly tedious books.

\"Far too many parents, crazy with anxiety about raising their children right, hand off their judgment to experts ranging from Dr. Spock to Dr. Brazelton, from Parenting magazine to the Newbery medal.\"

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Library Automation - Schools

Someone writes \"This is kind of interesting. Sirsi and Sagebrush Corporation have partnered to give Sagebrush a multiuser system to sell to the school market. Sagebrush has been buying marketshare for two years now and this allows them a slice of the pie that normally goes to the larger multiuser systems like Sirsi. None of the major vendors have shown any real talent in targeting this market. Whatt does this mean for Follet and Sirs? My guess is it doesn\'t hurt the bread and butter part of the business for Follet, the single school. To be truthful they could never win thoughs to begin with. However it does make Sagebrush more interesting to the multi-site school installations which are gravey to the larger vendors. So Sirsi now has someone dedicated to this market so that the other large vendors will have to fight for the large sites with the handicap of not really knowing the market.

The Press Release \"

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eBook Quickies

I have a bunch of eBook stories hanging around here, all of which are worth a quick read over.Random House turns to niche e-book sales on how they want to target niche audiences with smaller books online. (note: If you read this story, a 380x335 ad is obscene, no more News.com from me).

Here\'s One Healthy E-Publisher, FictionWise is doing just fine, with over 400 titles and sales topping 10,000 e-books a month.

Going Beyond the Book is now The McGraw-Hill Companies\' approach to e-publishing.
There is an Interesting quote from this PublishersWeekly story, plus one more story below.

Popularity boom speaks volumes about libraries

Here\'s a very nice story from The Chicago Tribune about how so much is changing in libraries, after being \"dark dens for bookworms and students\" for so long.
More than $3 billion has been spent on libraries nationwide over the last six years, and 1,200 libraries have been built or expanded. Now if they would just start asking the librarians how to actually build them correctly...

\"Good library architecture makes you stand straighter and feel good about coming to the library,\"

Thanks to Bob Cox for this one!

Bodleian collects prize for revamp.

Charles Davis writes \"The meticulous conservation of Oxford\'s Bodleian Library has earned an award from the
Pan-European Federation for Heritage, Europa Nostra.
Oxford University\'s main research library is one of
two English institutions to win a diploma at a
conference in The Hague, The Netherlands. Built in 1602, the Bodleian is one of the oldest libraries in Europe
See
thisisoxfordshire for the story
\"

Dubya Exits the Information Superhighway


This Story
from Capitolhillblue
says President Bush has now \"exited the information
superhighway\" avoid having his e-mail become public,
something I\'m sure BIll Gates, and Bill Clinton wish
they would\'ve done.

     \"Now that presidential e-mail is subject to
open records, it\'s going to be a phone-call
relationship,\" Bush said.

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Where Art Thou Money?

These stories all seem somehow related, and I\'m not
sure what else to do with them.

So you\'re afraid of
losing all your federal assistance
thanks to CIPA? Maybe someone will Make a Mistake and
give you $70,000 that was the schools, or vice-versa,
like in this case.
Maybe Someone Will Give You $10,000, or maybe you
could just Open Your Garage.

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How things would work in a copyright-free universe

The National
Post
has a rather I
nteresting Story
on copyright. Ilana Mercer
says the copyright system shoul be abolished because
there can be no justification for the use of force against
legitimate property owners.

\"And force is, very
plainly, what flows from the enforcement of the law.
Since ideas should not be treated as property, laws that
target those who have not violated person or property
are wrong.\"

I can\'t say I agree or disagree, but it is a very well
thought out argument.

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WA Considering Dropping Prison Libaries

Gov. Gary Locke wants to save money by eliminating
prison law libraries, which some say blocks
reasonable access to the courts, which some also say
will cause a flurry of lawsuits. Full Story from Seattle P-I.

\"It\'s wholesome activity,\" Alexander said. \"It\'s not
like we\'re setting up a motorcycle club for
prisoners.\"

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The President who reads, succeeds?

Interested in how history will remember the presidency of voracious reader Bill Clinton, Harold Evans ponders the question \"Does history suggest any correlation between a passion for serious reading and an ability to inspire and manage the nation?\" in this article from the New York Times.

Compiling a list of bibliophile presidents from biographies and histories, he compares them with presidential rankings from a 1994 Siena Research Institute tracking survey and the 1999 C-Span Survey of Presidential Leadership

Not surprisingly, the bibliophiles ranked higher overall.

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Alabama Virtual Library

Bonnie Lee sent in a story on the Alabama Virtual Library, a $3 million cooperative effort that brings online resources to schools.
This article from Infotoday.com provides an overview of the path they took to make this project a reality for Alabama, and spotlights the significant collaboration that was involved. It\'s quite an interesting and indepth how to guide on the entire process.

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Drowning in Information

Jeanie writes:\"There is a short article in Smart Computing in Plain English V12 (3)
entitled Drowning in Information. Two professors from the Univ of
Calif/Berkeley released the results of a study designed to measure the
yearly production of new information in the US and the world. Findings:
Worldwide production of info equals 250 books of data for each man, women
and child on the planet. Other findings include 93% of all new data
produced in 199 was in digital format.\"

No Link for this one, though seems similar to This One or maybe This.

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