BESS vs The Google Search Engine

Seth Finkelstein writes \"I\'ve just released a new
anticensorware investigation

Available
Here.

BESS vs The Google Search Engine (Cache, Groups, Images)

Abstract: This report examines how N2H2\'s censorware deals with
archives of large amount of information. Three features are examined
from the Google search engine (Cache, Groups, Images). N2H2/BESS is
found to ban the cached pages everywhere, pass porn in groups, and
consider all image searching to be pornography. The general problems
of censorware versus large archives are discussed (i.e., why
censorware is impelled to situations such as banning the Google cache).
\"

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The color of Internet access

ALICIA CALDWELL of the St. Petersburg Times writes:\"In what is the largest national survey of computer use, the U.S. Commerce Department today released statistics that show African-American and Hispanic children are far less likely to have a computer at home than white children. Consequently, computer access at schools and public libraries is particularly important to these youngsters as computers increasingly become life tools in the 21st century.\"
The story goes on to describe what libraries and schools in Tampa Bay are doing to provide access.
Full Story

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Speaking Volumes

Kevin Kipp from the St. Louis Commerce Magazine writes about the state of academic libraries in Missouri and how technology has improved services.
\"The world of libraries has changed because of technology,” says Karen Luebbert, vice president and executive assistant to the president at Webster University. “The key now is access rather than possession.\"
There is also a synopsis of Missouri\'s academic libraries showing volumes, budget and technology. Full Story

Plea for Improved School Libraries at National Book Festival

Award-winning children\'s book author and National Children\'s Book and Literacy Alliance founder Mary Brigid Barrett will make the case for improving school libraries this Saturday at the National Book Festival in Washington:

Libraries and librarians are in the forefront of literacy outreach, Barrett says. While organizations that give children books are providing a valuable service, they can never replace libraries. \'\'Giving a child one or two books is like giving him one free breakfast when he\'s starving,\'\' she said. School libraries are particularly needed today, because most children cannot walk to their public libraries. Libraries in urban areas may present a safety threat, and in rural areas, the distances are often too great.

Barrett says that her work with senators Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat, and Thad Cochran, a Mississippi Republican, on legislation to increase funding for school libraries has revealed some disturbing information . . .

More from the Boston Globe.

Bookmobiles Still Going Strong

Bookmobiles are still going strong in PA. Currently there is at least one bookmobile in 25 Pennsylvania counties. The program began in 1977 with a single bookmobile. The bookmobiles are especially popular in rural areas without a local library. From the Tribune-Review

Whatever happend to the Homepage?

Mark writes \"Adam Druckman, Detroit Metro Times: The personal home page was the Web\'s first rallying call for mass social change. \"On the Internet,\" the pundits claimed, \"everyone will be a publisher!\" What happened?
Full Story from
Alternet.org\"

The authors says the old style \"look at me\" homepages have changed, now the big thing is Blogging (e.g.).

\"I miss the personal home pages of yore. Their clunky charm was the prototype for the Web\'s emerging power to communicate. And now that so many of them are gone (or turned into Web logs), I wish somebody had saved the original models, if only for history\'s sake.\"

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Billington Interview on National Book Fest

Cliff Urr writes \"Diane Rehm talks with James Billington, Librarian of Congress since 1987, about the upoming National Book Festival, hosted by First Lady Laura Bush, and about the resources and mission of the world\'s largest library.

Realaudio Link.
National Book Festival link: loc.gov/bookfest \"

For some odd reason everytime I hear about the LOC I get thirsty for a Coke, is that wrong?

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Finland Goes Easy on Map Thief

A Finnish judge has gone easy on map thief Melvin Nelson Perry:

British citizen Melvin Nelson Perry, 45, was given an 18-month prison sentence on Tuesday for stealing six valuable maps from the map collection of Finnish explorer A. E. Nordenskiöld from the library of the University of Helsinki in February this year. In spite of his prison sentence, Perry walked out of Helsinki District Court a free man, as he was not immediately ordered into custody. It is unlikely that he will ever have to serve his time unless he decides to come to Finland voluntarily.

Perry has not yet decided if he plans to appeal his sentence. He said that he would be willing to do community service, \"but not in a public library\", he added.

More from the Helsingin Sanomat.

Archiving the Past, but Embracing the Future

From the New York Times, a biography/informational article about Rodney Phillips, the director of the Humanities and Social Services Library at NYPL.

JOHN KIFNER writes: \"This is an amazing edifice, built to honor education and culture,\" Mr. Phillips said. \"I was so lucky to get that job out of library school.\"

Full Story

Can the Information Commons Be Saved?

What looks to be a very interesting article on the corrosive effects of emerging intellectual property laws on intellectual freedom:

One of the more confusing paradoxes of the Internet Era is that even as more information is becoming readily available than ever before, various commercial forces are converging to make information more scarce, or at least more expensive and amenable to strict market control. More than an oddity, this paradox may be an augury about the fate of the free information ecology that has long distinguished our democratic culture . . .

More from the Center for Arts and Culture, with thanks to Library Juice, which you should all bookmark right now :)

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New Guinea Prison Libraries Need Books

From today\'s Papua New Guinea Post Courier:

PRISONERS NEED BOOKS

I AM writing on behalf of the detainees (prisoners) in the Papua New Guinea Correctional Institutions who are earnestly seeking the assistance of the citizens of this country and overseas for library books. All the jails in the country have their own mini libraries but only a few books. Others only have the Jack and the Beanstalk novels and nothing else. We therefore need more books and other literature to restock the detainees’ libraries around the country.So, if you have any books that you want to “throw away”, please I urge you to donate them to:

Assistant Commissioner
Welfare and Rehabilitation,
Correctional Service Headquarter,
PO Box 6889
Boroko, NCD 111
Papua New Guinea

Your kind donations will certainly contribute a lot more to the wellbeing of our dear ones in the prisons around Papua New Guinea.

Stephen P. Pokanis
Bomana

More information on books-to-prisoners programs in the United States can be found here. If anyone has links for programs in Canada, the UK, or elsewhere, please email me and I\'ll post them here.

Librarians are Sexy

That\'s about all there is to it folks: just a short notation in Nick Denton\'s weblog entry for August 27th. Some pretty high praise from the founder of Moreover Technologies which takes online current awareness to a new level. The entry in the \'blog is to Peter Scott\'s list of library weblogs.

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Bookstore Refuses to Release Custumers\' Purchase Details to FBI

The US Attorney\'s Office in New Jersey has agreed not to pursue subpoenas of purchase details for Senator Robert Torricelli and seven other people. The Senator is the subject of a grand jury investiagtion. Subpoenas were served to three bookstores: Arundel Books in Seattle, Olsson\'s in DC, and Books and Books in Florida.
The American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression is supporting the bookstore owners in fighting the subpoenas.From the Seattle Times.

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Publishers Selling EBooks on Yahoo!

Carrie writes \"Four major publishers have agreed to open an online clearinghouse on the Internet portal
Yahoo to sell their electronic books directly to readers, advancing their efforts to liberate themselves from reliance on online retailers in the nascent business of selling books in digital form.
Full Story from The NYTimes \"


They go on to say Although almost no one is buying electronic books today, there is a mad dash to be the first to market with this kind of thing, on the outside chance it does take off.

Random House, Simon & Schuster, Penguin Putnam, and HarperCollins are the publishers teaming up with Yahoo.

Check Out the Erotica in the State Library

Marina Chestnykh oversees an erotica collection assembled by the Communist government that has been a secret for most of the time it\'s been kept. They say such a tight secret that no one knows exactly what is among the approximately 11,000 books, postcards, prints, brochures, drawings and other objects. It\'s on display in the the State Library, formerly the Lenin State LibraryState Library, formerly the Lenin State Library.

\"All these books brought to the Soviet Union could survive only here, in the library,\" said Ms. Ryzhak, who began working in special sections in 1976. \"Anywhere else they would have been burned immediately. We were able to save them, and they are part of our Russian history that we can now have back.\"

Full Story from the NY Times

Libraries hold key to deterring illiteracy

Laura Bush and James H. Billington [you should know who they are] have ganged up and written an Announcement piece in the USA Today.

They will be hosting the first National Book Festival on Saturday at the Library of Congress in Washington. It\'s intended to be a celebration of the crucial role books and reading have in our individual lives and in the democracy that we cherish.

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Library throws the book at patron

The Dallasnews is running This One on a man who landed in jail because of Cinderella and Tom and Jerry. They say that about 20 people have been arrested in 10 years in Nolan County, TX.

His failure to return the two books he\'d checked out for his children, plus two others about handwriting analysis, cost him more than $1,000, jeopardized his job and left him with a criminal record.

\"It\'s crazy,\" said Mr. Fox. \"It\'s ludicrous. This is on my record as theft; nobody can believe it was over library books.\"

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Law Librarians as Newscasters

Susannah Crego writes \"I wrote an article on law librarians acting as newscasters in their law firms. It is now available on the Law.com website.
Too many law firms believe librarians are unnecessary. \"Hey, it\'s all available online.\" In order to combat that, law librarians need to do more than just provide legal research assistance. One way-provide news.
The Story is Here
Or go to law.com and click on Law Librarians on the right side of the page. My article is sthe first one in the section titled: \"Breaking News.\"

This is a story not just for Lawbrarians, but for all of us, I think.

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Librarians Criticize Copyright Office DMCA Report

This article appeared shortly after the Copyright Office report itself on 8/31, but I missed it:

\"Given the relative infancy of digital rights
management, it is premature to consider any legislative change at this time,\" the report states. The Copyright Office is required to issue the report to Congress so that lawmakers can decide whether there are holes or flaws in the digital-copyright law that need to be fixed. Library groups and scholars have long argued that the act\'s anticircumvention provision and nonnegotiable license contracts with software vendors have been undermining the first-sale principle. The anticircumvention provision forbids breaking the encryption on digital material. . .

More from the Chronicle of Higher Education, with thanks to LLRX.com.

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\'Onion\' editor talks about new book

CNN has a nifty Little Interview with Onion editor Robert Siegel, they have a new book out -- \"Dispatches from the Tenth Circle.\".
The interview is short, but funny.


Siegel: Are your stories real?
CNN: Absolutely. We are the world\'s news leader.
Siegel: OK, then we\'re on the same page here.

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