Emotions flare over exhibit removal

Yet Another Story on the big flap in Alaska.
You may recall Mayor George Wuerch removed a gay pride exhibit from the city library. Now they say a torrent of messages from both sides has poured into Wuerch\'s office since he ruled on June 5 against the display at Z.J. Loussac Public Library. This quote made it all worth reading.

\"Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!\" wrote Linda Carleton, a mother of two whose family owns an electrical contracting business. \"You have made me proud. I was so excited I faxed this good news to Dr. Laura,\" a reference to talk radio host Laura Schlessinger. In an interview, Carleton said, \"I don\'t want my children going to the library and thinking it is an acceptable lifestyle.\"


America\'s Chronicles: only in Canada

Cabot writes \"A small Ottawa company is gearing up to store more than 300 years of the United States\' most precious memories in Canada\'s capital.

Cold North Wind, which digitizes newspapers so
they can be searched and viewed over the Internet,
has teamed with the National Newspaper Association
(NNA) in a deal that will see Cold North digitize
microfilmed editions of 3,600 NNA-member newspapers, bringing as many as 500 million news
pages to Internet.

Full Story \"

Stolen goods in, literary heritage out

The Guardian (UK) has this story on how Britain is becoming the
new centre for the illegal trafficking of rare books and
manuscripts, many of which have been stolen from European
While they can\'t seem to keep the illegal stuff out, the
good stuff is getting away.
This story
from The Independent on how British libraries
are not able to
compete with \"wealthy American libraries\" which are
offering big bucks to buy up the papers of famous modern
British authors including Ted Hughes, Martin Amis and Salman
Now if someone will just point me at one of these wealthy
American libraries...

Burning Questions, Final Answers

Bob Cox pointed out Forbes is running
a really neato Series of Questions.

They Include, Who was the first person to envision the
Internet? Does the Web site of the Girl Scouts of
America contain cookies? Will there ever be
compatibility among operating systems?
And... Who first called it \"surfing the Web\"?
Of course we all know it was Jean Armour Polly, a
former public librarian working on an article about the
Internet in 1992.
It\'s a really fun look at some of the questions you
never thought to ask, not that you would know who to
ask if you\'d have thought of it in the first place.


Library accused of $4.2 million flub

I just like the title of this one, when was the last time you saw the word \"Flub\" in the title of a story?

The Detroit News is Reporting the Detroit Public Library\'s chief accountant says the Detroit Public library is mishandling millions of dollars worth of grant money. He was terminated last week after just five months on the job.


Cataloging Newspapers: A Journey into the Past

Chris Mulder, State Agency Cataloger at State Library of North Carolina has written a nice Article about cataloging newspapers in an older edition of Mississippi Libraries. It almost makes me want to go back and do some cataloging.

\"Do you like mysteries? How about puzzles, riddles or mazes? Well, if you can answer \"yes\" to any of the above, you may be a natural-born newspaper cataloger. For me, newspapers offer the most fun a serials cataloger can have, even though they can also be very challenging.\"


The History of the ALA Code of Ethics

Online Library Auction

Someone passed along This Story from the great city of Columbus, OH.
The Bexley Library has taken to auctioning books on the web to help raise money.
They\'ve been doing it for 2 years and have raised $1,800 by selling about 100 books online. The library\'s biggest items: two pamphlets and a signed letter from Booker T. Washington that went for $500.

\"They knew that they had some gems they were getting,\" said Sandy Lemkin, a reference librarian at Bexley Library. \"It\'s a wider audience that you can appeal to. When you\'re on eBay, you have wonderful exposure.\"

Random Numbers

Conducting a collection survey? Today\'s New York Times profiles several free online purveyors of random numbers that can assist you in getting a valid sample...

Pay a visit to the home page of [a] purveyor of unpredictability, called Hotbits, and you will hear what sounds like the erratic clicking of a Geiger counter. It is the sound of neutrons in a radioactive substance spewing out electrons and gamma rays as they decay. This decay is random, as guaranteed by laws of quantum mechanics, so by training a Geiger counter on a sample of krypton 85 and feeding the signal to a computer, Hotbits generates a constant stream of random digits. Just fill out an electronic form, saying how many bits you want and they will be dispatched immediately over the Internet. . .

School Library Books

LGordon writes \"A new program to help provide new library books for the schools in Clark County, Nevada, is underway. Clark County Reads aims to help provide library books for the children of Las Vegas. In Clark County, school libraries provide an average of 7 books per student, while the national average is 18. With only $7.00 per student allocated for library expenditures, it is difficult for schools to purchase an adequate number of books to replace the aged books on the shelves\"

There is an
Editorial and the Full Story

The morality police

Salon has an interesting Story on our new found censorship impulse.
Charles Taylor comes out solidly on the side of free speech.

\"At the heart of that argument is the belief that society should be remade for everyone, not just children. Basically, my friend was arguing that all adult discourse should be rendered suitable for kids, that entertainment or writing specifically intended for adults is somehow dangerous and that, as journalists, we should all be required to adhere to a phony \"family newspaper\" standard. \"


Hot on the Scent of Information

Wired showed the way to This Really Neat Study by the Xerox PARC User Interface Research Group on Information Foraging.

\"Information foraging theory is an approach to the analysis of human activities involving information access technologies. It aims to provide an understanding of how strategies and technologies for information seeking, gathering, and consumption are adapted to the flux of information in the environment. Much of the work is inspired by optimal foraging theory in biology and anthropology, which analyzes the adaptive value of food-foraging strategies. The theory focuses analysis on how the user gains value from interaction and the cost of that interaction. Adaptive behaviors and technologies are ones that have superior value in relation to cost (e.g. time). We use the theory to understand human-computer interaction, and to develop new design and engieering models.\"


Why does feminism matter in LIS Studies?

Found This Interesting paper by Kirsten Anderson on why feminism does matter in Library and Information Studies.

Some of her points include, Feminism is for everybody, The status of women and the status of librarianship, Female intensive, but not female dominant and Gender division of labour.

Check it Out.


On The EEOC Ruling

On This Story
Dan Lester writes: \"I\'d like to see any ALA policy or official statement that is opposed
to having library staff maintain normal order and decorum. And of course that means that you have to have policies relating to whatever normal order and decorum might be in your environment. In fact, I think that a bit of research will show that ALA has taken a position in several cases supporting reasonable policies for patron behavior.


EInk Now In Colour

Slashdot told me about another cool story. This time NewScientist is running a Story on EInk. They say they have succeeded in making electronic paper work in full color. They say Laptops, palmtops and cellphones with rigid electronic paper screens will be on the market within the next two years.

Coming soon, eNewsPapers, eFoldUpBooks, ePaper?

See Also.


Michigan Child Online Protection Act Ruled Against

Slashdot told me The Child Online Protection Act in Michigan has been shot down.
Cyberspace.org has all the details.

On June 1, 2001, Judge Arthur J. Tarnow issued a permanent injunction against the enforcement of Michigan\'s 1999 Public Act 33.


Politically Incorrect Book Leads to Assault

writes \"History can be dangerous. A
student who checked out a book on the Confederacy
(with a Confederate flag on the cover) for a school
assignment was kicked unconscious by some
students calling him \"racist\". (Story) While this happened in a school
hallway rather than the library, we shouldn\'t assume
that the library is a sanctuary. It seem that the
administration of this school failed in its essential duty
to provide a safe and secure learning facility, including
promoting tolerance.

Those who debated with me previously about the
desirability of making *all* information available to *all*
patrons in a library might question the consistency of
my philosophy: Do I think the student had a \"right\"
to access to this \"inflammatory\" material?\"



Alaskan Mayor Bans Gay Exhibit

Mayor George Wuerch must\'ve been very bored last
week. He took it upon himself to decide what the library
is allowed to display.

He said the exhibit couldn\'t be allowed at Loussac
Library because it takes an advocacy position. He\'s not
bored anymore, he\'s now had about 400 telephone
calls on the issue. Keep in mind, there were no
complaints. James passed along the Friday\'s Story, and One From Today.

\"Not only does it seem to be a ban on free speech, it
also seems to be a violation of the library\'s own policy
on how these displays are selected and put up,\" said
AkCLU executive director Jennifer Rudinger.


Fixing Librarians

Kevin and Kell, a comic about an unlikely family of animals, takes a look at (among other things) updating librarians for the new millennium.


Are patrons a headache?

Holly writes \"A new Study ranks librarians as the #2 profession most likely to get headaches during work. 43% of librarians reported suffering from workday headaches. The cause? \"Librarians stated that people who have \"no clue\" how to use research resources cause the most headaches (56 percent) for them.\" \"



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