Loss of originals; libraries and preservation

Randall B. Kemp writes \"In response to the ruckus caused by Nicholson Baker\'s New Yorker article on the destruction of newspapers in libraries, Richard J. Cox writes in First Monday on the need for preservation in the digital age. While Cox finds fault with Baker\'s arguments, he supports the ensuing public discussion. \"

Who Decides What Books to Ban

Who has the final word about challenged books in your library? The director? The Board of Trustees? This article from the Star Banner is about a library advisory board (made up of private citizens) that, through appeal, can be the final arbiter on any questionable book.\"The unanimous decision to change library policy came after four hours of rancorous public comment in front of hundreds of people packing the commission auditorium. Most of them spoke about \"It\'s Perfectly Normal,\" a sex education book by Robie H. Harris, which some have characterized as pornographic and want permanently removed from the library shelves.\" -- Read More

That Guy Who Hit Stephen King OD\'d on Painkillers

You will have scroll down a bit to find this story from the Mount Washington Valley about the man who mysteriously died after hitting the king of horror. It turnd out that he might have overdosed on painkillers. This freaky story takes another odd turn when we find out that the guy may have died on Stephen King\'s birthday.\"The motorist who gained notoriety when he struck Stephen King with his van died of an accidental overdose of a painkiller, according to the state medical examiner’s office.
Bryan Smith, 43, of Fryeburg, died from an overdose of fentanyl, according to toxicology reports. He was found dead in his home on Sept. 22, three days after he was last seen by family members.\". Further down on the page, read about a book that was taken off a required reading list, but not out of the library...and the appeals that will be forthcoming.

Librarian..(aka Chief Information Officer)

Here is a story out of the Wall Street Journal about the opportunities available for librarians. It\'s nice to know that we are wanted.\"Senior-level corporate librarians, now often known as chief information officers (CIO) and directors of information research, are in high demand in nearly every industry research specialty, executive recruiters say.\" -- Read More

Librarian Gift List

Dave Thomson
writes \"Hello - My sister in law is a librarian and I\'m
looking
for appropriate \"librarian\" merchandise for her for
Christmas.
In a way I thought it was nice that I didn\'t find you
selling mugs and t-shirts but thought you might know
of a source for a sweat shirt covered with a book
design or some such.\"

Good question! What is on your
list, or what are you getting your favorite librarian for
the Holidays.More importantly, where are you getting it?

Cyber-library dedicated to researchers

Bonnie Petersen was kind enough to send in This Story from The Denver Post about the new JonesKnowledge.com site. They says the site will have research guidance, reference assistance, links to periodicals, government documents, scholarly works and almost anything else needed to complete a master\'s thesis or other research project. Now here is the cool part, A group of 40 librarians will be on hand 14 hours a day to help with research

New Bible, and Logophilia Stories

The everhelpful Lee Hadden writes :


\"The ever popular Smithsonian Magazine has two articles of interest to
librarians this month (Volume 31, no. 9, December 2000).


The first article is about the new manuscript copy of the Holy Bible
being inscribed with calligraphy at St. John\'s College, Collegeville,
Minnesota. This is the first hand inscribed copy of the Bible (in the
English language New Revised Standard Version instead of in Latin) to be
completed by the authentic methods and techniques from the Middle Ages in
the last five hundred years. The article by Per Ola et al, \"Inscribing the
Word,\" is on pages 79-83.

A second article on logophilia (a love of words) discusses a popular
a-word-a-day service and website that presents new words, their meanings
and etymology. \"Warning: Logophilia is Addictive\" is by Rudolph Chelminski,
and this article can be found on pages 66-74.\"

Knowledge Management Meets the Portal

Earthweb has a story A story,with the longest URL I\'ve even seen, on how to use portals to your advantage.

\"Those people are always asking the question, looking for more information that will make their jobs more efficient.\"

Stephen King\'s Net Horror Story

Slashdot has a interesting look at eBooks, \"The Plant\" in particular. He says that King has demonstrated that the Net is a powerful new tool for selling books rather than a technology that replaces them. He goes on to say that the web site is a lesson in how not to sell and market a novel, and the web is a good way to distribute textbooks.

Ebrary Signs Major Publishing Deal

CNET has this story on Ebrary closing a deal that would allow them to offer lots of research titles to many people. It looks that they will try to secure the academic market in the narrowing e-book business.\"The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company is building a virtual library that will allow students, teachers or other researchers to search for and read digital books online for free. Researchers also will have the option to buy materials, offered online as .pdf (portable document format) files, in print form for a fee.\" -- Read More

Should R-Rated Movies Be Allowed to Be Checked Out to Kids?

Should a 12 year old be allowed to check out an R-Rated video? Is it censorship if we do not allow them to do so? In this opinion piece from the Spokesman Review, the writers state that it may be in the best interests of the library to abide by the rules that the movie theaters have. This may be easier to enforce in the public library setting: There are less people there, and it would be harder for the kiddies to get access to the films. What do y\'all think?\"The library can calm this tempest in a teapot by abiding by the rating label on the video cover. In the movie industry an R rating means children 17 and under are not to be allowed to see a movie unless accompanied by an adult. The library should adopt a similar policy: No one under age 18 should be allowed to check out one of its R-rated videos.\" -- Read More

Paying Through the Mouth

Here is a pretty neat story from the Charlston Gazette. A library has decided to take cans of food as payment for overdue library materials. The food is then distributed to homeless shelters.\"Your momentary joy at recovering the long-lost book probably has faded fast amid thoughts of the fine that has accrued over the months.

But fear not. With a can of creamed corn or a box of wild rice, you can return Harry to his home without straining your pocketbook - and help feed people in need at the same time.\" -- Read More

A New Library!! (with nothing in it)

No, this is not a repeat from a few weeks ago. Yet another library has opened it\'s doors without really being complete. My mother always told me that first impressions were very important. Head and Shoulders has also made it clear that you only get one shot to make a good first impression. However, despite the fact that the library is slightly bare, the residents love the new place. The full story is a available from the Binghamton Press.\"Although Wednesday marks the one-month anniversary of Broome County Library opening its doors at its new $7.8-million location on Court Street, the building is still not fully operational.\" -- Read More

ZapMe to schools: Pay for your free computers

MSNBC is reporting that ZapMe! has zapped public schools with an ultimatum: pay for your free computers or we\'re taking them back.

According to the article, the company is blaming Ralph Nader (a popular pastime these days) because the notion of advertising to a captive audience didn\'t sit well with some folks.

This is an important warning sign to public libraries, too: if your partnership with a corporation sours, you may find yourself worse off than before you started. -- Read More

Humanists struggle to understand information as a commodity

A Penny For Your Thoughts: A Humanists Struggle to Understand Information as a Commodity is a paper by University of Alberta LIS student Geoffrey Harder. I like it. The title is self-explanatory, but if you want more information before you check it out, here is the intro: -- Read More

Filtering Hobbles Libraries

The
Washington Post
has a short but sweet editorial on filtering.
They say the new Education Department appropriations
bill could hobble Internet access for schools and
libraries that get help from the government \"e-rate.\"
They say that mandating filtering puts too heavy a
burden
on schools or libraries that want to go their own way.

Porn in the Portal

Brian writes \"Wired News reports that officials of a portal called Rediff.com are going on trial in India for providing access to pornography.


Great quote from a Rediff employee: \"Even God cannot alter the way a search engine works.\"
\"

Digital Library Initiatives Across Europe

Computers In Libraries has a report on how the Digital Library thing is going in Europe. They also include a nice definition of the term, \"Digital Library\".

\"Digital libraries are organizations that provide the resources, including the specialized staff, to select, structure, offer intellectual access to, interpret, distribute, preserve the integrity of, and ensure the persistence over time of collections of digital works so that they are readily and economically available for use by a defined community or set of communities\"

Our Great Addiction

It\'s not as sexy as Herion, as much fun as crack or as trendy as X...The Detroit Metro Times calls book buying a \"great addiction\". I think more than a few of us suffer from this addiction, and This Article takes a look at it.
If you or someone you love suffers with this addiction, Don\'t miss the Tips for compulsive book collectors

“When I go into a bookstore, the smell of a bookstore, or a library, really gets to me,” says Joy, a 30-something Wayne State English student. “I get excited about the idea of something new to read.”

AskUsQuestions.com

I found a site so cool, I added a new topic. If you\'re
in NE Ohio you already know about this cool site. AskUsQuestions.com
is an on-line library with a twist, it allows online chats
with librarians from local libraries.
This is such a damn cool idea. Not just because it allows
librarians to work from home, but because of the level of
service delivered to customers. Are more libraries doing
this?
\"AskUsQuestions.com is a service developed by 15 public
libraries and the NOLA Regional Library System.  Through the
service patrons from participating libraries can talk with
live experienced reference librarians on the Internet from
8:00 PM until 12:00 PM (EST) Sunday - Thursday.\"

And a
cool domain name to boot! -- Read More

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