EFF: Canadian DMCA in the Works

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has issued a call to arms regarding proposed changes to the Copyright Act that mirror many provisions
of the DMCA:

Canadian citizens, and others, are urged to contact the Canadian government and express their opposition to legislation, similar to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in the U.S., that would outlaw circumvention of technological restrictions put in place by copyright holders. The Canadian government is accepting public comment until September 15, 2001 on its proposed \"Consultation Paper on Digital Copyright Issues\" which considers such measures. . . Canada is considering adopting anti-circumvention legislation in response to the World Intellectual Property Organization\'s (WIPO) 1996 Copyright Treaty. This treaty, however, does not require enacting national legislation that outlaws technology with many lawful uses. Given the dismal US experience with the DMCA, other countries should learn from and steer clear of the U.S. Congress\'s mistake.

More with thanks to Politech. The public comment period on modifications to the Copyright Acts ends 9/15/01. My apologies in advance for the icon-related cultural imperialism displayed here ;)

Topic: 

Middle English Dictionary Project Complete

After 71 years, the Middle English Dictionary Project has born fruit:

The dictionary covers 15,000 pages and includes more than 55,000 entries. The numerous meanings and usages are illustrated with 900,000 quotations ranging from the time of William the Conqueror to the advent of printing. They come from Chaucer, the stories of King Arthur and early Bibles, as well as contemporary letters, wills and remarkably detailed medical treatises.

The Middle English Dictionary is \"a labor of love . . . that is practically unrivaled in scale by any historical dictionary project of the modern era--and perhaps of any reference work project as well,\" said Richard Ekman, a former officer with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which since 1975 has provided the bulk of the financing for the $22-million project. . .

More from the Los Angeles Times . Thanks to Slashdot.

Topic: 

Library Card Sign-up Month!

Did you know that September is Library Card Sign-up Month? This story from the Poughkeepsie Journal was news to me and the ALA\'s official page will tell you all about it.

Topic: 

The first National Book Festival

It\'s the first National Book Festival. It takes place on Saturday, September 8, on the grounds of the Library of Congress and the U.S. Capitol, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and will celebrate the joys of reading.

The Have a WebCast if you can\'t make it.

Topic: 

Article contributors wanted

Librarian career development newsletter Info Career Trends is seeking article contributors. The immediate need is for the November issue on \"networking and mentoring,\" but queries are also welcome for future issues. For more information, see the web page
- click on \"Contributor Guidelines\" for more on contributing and a list of upcoming themes. Back issues and an online subscription form are also accessible from this page.
Rachel, the editor, mentioned that the theme of January\'s issue will be \"keeping current\" and she thought some of the LISNews authors might have something to say, hint, hint!

Topic: 

The Future of Digital Scientific Literature

A heavily hypertexted article that argues for \"experimentation and a lack of dogmatism\" as scientific publishing undergoes a sea change:

\"The Internet is easier to invent than to predict\" is a maxim that time has proven to be a truism. Much the same might be said of scientific publishing on the Internet, the history of which is littered with failed predictions. Technological advance itself will, of course, bring dramatic changes — and it is a safe bet that bright software minds will punctually overturn any vision. But it is becoming clear that developing common standards will be critical in determining both the speed and extent of progress towards a scientific web . . .

More from Nature, with thanks to the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog.

Topic: 

Drinks yes, food no

The Park Ridge (Illinois) public library has ended its summer trial of allowing food in the library. Patrons are still permitted to consume non-alcoholic beverages, though. Story in the Chicago Tribune.

One Book, One Chicago Update

Always alert Bob Cox sent along This Story from the Chicago Tribune on The citywide \"One Book, One Chicago\" program.
The Mockingbird has flown off the shelves at book stores and libraries around Chicago Land, and a daily, e-mail quiz on the book is being conducted in the Office of Budget and Management in Chicago City Hall.
The windy city has certainly taken wing to this book.

Topic: 

Majority of Chicago Public Libraries Refuse Filters

The Barrington Courier-Review reports that most Chicago public libraries remain undecided or will not implement filtering to comply with federal law.
The amount of money lost by an individual library by noncompliance can vary a lot, from $15,000 to less than $700. Many librarians say they are waiting for the law to be struck down as unconstitutional.

Topic: 

Questia CEO says Online Libraries Beneficial

Troy L. Williams, founder and CEO of Questia Media Inc., has authored a piece in the Houston Business Journal on how fabulous online libraries are for, \"students and educators.\" When he says libraries, he naturally means companies like Questia, which are not libraries in my book.
many college students are extremely computer savvy and do all of their research on Internet.
It may be computer savvy to do all your research on the Internet, but it sure isn\'t smart. For the other side of the coin see \"The Computer Delusion\" in The Atlantic

Library mystery absorbs alderman

*Updated link, sorry about that*
Here is a story from the Chicago Sun-Times about an alderman who is trying to figure out why his regional library is removing \"books in good condition.\" Ald. Eugene Shulter has community activists \"up in arms\" over what seems to be routine weeding. Security has twice attempted to have him removed from the library. Folks, this is not a good example of community relations.

Canadian MPs Largely Web-Illiterate?

An unofficial experiment by student, programmer, concerned citizen, and Canadian Brendan Wilson suggests that many members of Parliament may not be aware of the importance of the Web:

Overall the experiment demonstrated that the average Canadian cannot contact their MP office [via email] and expect a response in a reasonable length of time, if at all. My point here is not to ridicule the MPs themselves, or their offices, but rather point out the need for a more effective and interactive form of government. Our current form of government was built on the assumption that the general public did not have access to information on current events, or mechanisms to have their opinion communicated efficiently; with modern telecommunications technology, this is no longer the case. . .

What impact will this ignorance have on the forthcoming changes to Canadian copyright law? More from Brendan Wilson\'s site, with thanks to Politech.

Topic: 

South African Squatters Fight for Library

A library of donated books in a Johannesburg squatter camp has been closed, prompting an angry response from residents:

A library donated to the Joe Slovo squatter camp in Johannesburg was closed last month because a residents\' committee was not informed about its opening. This week supporters of the library threatened legal action against the committee if it did not allow residents access to the facility. . . \"We need the library, especially these children,\" said Japie Mashadi, pointing at dirty children playing between the shacks. . .

More from allAfrica.com.

Important Court Victory Against the DMCA

Excite News is one place with The Story on EBay\'s victory in court this week.

This case tested just one provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and the DMCA failed.

Judge Robert J. Kelleher dismissed Hendrickson\'s request for damages from eBay, saying among other things that the copyright infringement actually occurred offline. Although it may facilitate the sale of pirated material, \"eBay does not have the right and ability to control such activity,\" a standard required by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the judge wrote.

Hopefully this will be the first in a long line of DMCA releated defeats.

Topic: 

Read -- or decorated a room with -- any good books

Cornelia passed along This One from the Chicago Tribune.

It\'s a fun look at just how cool it looks to have books around.

\"Nothing says taste and intelligence quite like books. The set of NBC\'s \"Today\" show also includes a goodly portion of books arranged discreetly on a shelf, as if to suggest that Kate and Matt are passionate bibliophiles. In the shadow of books, everyone looks smarter.\"

Topic: 

State to pay librarian $108,000 salary

From the Honolulu Star Bulletin:
\"State librarian Virginia Lowell is slated to get a pay raise from the Board of Education tomorrow, which would boost her annual salary to $108,000 from the current $85,302.\"
Full Story

Topic: 

Unlikely kicking guru kick-starts punters

You guessed it, the unlikely guru is a former librarian! In this story from The Nando Times, Geoff Calkins writes:\"You wouldn\'t think she\'d know anything about kicking,\" says James Gaither, the Memphis punter. \"But she knows everything there is to know.\" Meet Carol White, former high school librarian, current kicking guru and possible savior-passing-through at Memphis.\"
Full Story

Topic: 

Creators defend kids\' sex book

Katie Pesznecker from the Anchorage Daily News has written a follow up to an earlier article about the kids\' book \"It\'s Perfectly Normal\". \"Robie Harris knows there are parents who don\'t want their kids reading about masturbation, homosexuality and orgasms. And that\'s fine with Harris, the author of \"It\'s Perfectly Normal,\" the sexual health book under challenge in Anchorage school libraries.\"
Full Story

Topic: 

Harry Potter in the Money with Coin Fans

I keep thinking this Harry Potter thing has gone to far, and then it goes a bit further.

We now have Harry Coins.

More than 25,000 Harry Potter coins sold out in under five hours in England. The coin is legal tender in the Isle of Man.

\"It has gone manic here. People are going crazy buying them. We sold more than 25,000 in five hours on Wednesday, Taya Pobjoy, managing director of Pobjoy Mint, told Reuters on Thursday.\"


Full Story from Yahoo!

Topic: 

Pearls of Wisdom @ your library

Judy Nelson writes \"3M Library Systems is having a drawing for a $100
American Express Gift Certificate and all you have to do is submit your quote and picture by November 1st to be entered into the drawing! We are calling it \"Pearls of Wisdom @ your library.\" Share your Pearls of Wisdom with other library professionals! For more information and to see the most recent \"Pearls of Wisdom @ your library\" go to the 3M website.
\"

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS Subscribe to LISNews: - All comments