Future for Questia a question mark

Chron.com has a sad, yet not suprising Story on the state of Questia. After almost 3 years, more than $110 million in VC, and a 300-person staff, they have yet to hit even 1,000 paying subscribers. That\'s not a mistake, not even One Thousand.

They had hoped to have 50,000 titles by February, but only have about 35,000 and another 5,000 of them not completely cleared of copyright restrictions.


Bookstores Drop Suit Against Chains

Yahoo is reporting The
independent bookstores have
dropped their antitrust lawsuit against book giants
Barnes &Noble and Borders in exchange for $4.7

Both sides claim they won.

``Fizzle. Fizzle. Fizzle,\'\' said Stephanie Oda,
who publishes
Subtext, a Connecticut newsletter covering the
industry. ``Business is not fair. This is a capitalistic


The Social Order Of Libraries

Lee Hadden has written an interesting look at class rules and the social order in libraries. Since he put Systems Librarians near the top, I can\'t help but agree with him ;-)

\"It doesn\'t surprise me that there are problems of going from one
aspect of librarianship to another. It violates class rules in libraries,
and upsets the social order.
Actually, there is an unnamed but very strongly identified pecking
order in the class of librarians. Why are people getting so upset over this
problem? Passions are heated because the stakes are so small. Actually,
social settings are set up rather like a water fountain, with a number of
different library jobs floating at the top, but fewer identified ones at
the bottom. \"

Much More...


IMLS Has Librarian at the Helm

\"The President intends to nominate Robert S. Martin to be Director of the
Institute of Museum and Library Services. He is currently a Professor and
Interim Director of the School of Library and Information Studies at Texas
Women\'s University in Denton, Texas. He served as Director and Librarian
of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission from 1995 to 1999 and
served as a Professor and as Associate Dean of Special Collections at
Louisiana State University from 1991 to 1995. He is a graduate of Rice
University, received a Master\'s degree from North Texas State University
and a Doctorate in Library Science from the University of North Carolina. \"

Full Press Release

Uncle Frank on Baker

Uncle Frank has written a Review of Nicholson Baker\'s Book, Double Fold. He says we, as librarians, have to choose and get rid of some stuff.\" Saving everything, regardless of its merit, is not a choice, but an obsession\".
He also says he\'s going to get rid of those Nancy Drew books.Now that\'s a shame.


Net Filtering Site Hacked and Defaced

This is almost funny...
CyberNanny\'s web site has been defaced by a hacker called Hackweiser. It appears that Hackweiser has a sense of humor. If you type in the CyberNanny address, or click on the link, you\'ll get a prominent notice stating that \"it has been compromised and its admins \"may be \'trying\' to figure out what the f*** has happened to their site\". You can also read more here at The Register.


Library Web access could make \'sexual deviants\'

Someone writes \"

SUMMARY: The Florida legislature\'s resident homophobe is now arguing that unfiltered Internet access in public libraries creates \"sexual deviants.\" \"

Full Story

He also says there was at least one child running a pornography business from a library computer in Broward County.


Library Jeopardy

Rob Lenholt writes \"This came through one of my listservs. It\'s
pretty cool.

Library science jeopardy! \"

Just like the popular television version, the primary rule remains to provide your answer in the form of a question. There are six categories to select from, each containing five answers in ascending order of difficulty.


Fees Dropped Patrons Pop

Janet Clark writes:\"
In Alberta most public libraries charge a membership fee. Librarians know
the arguments for and against that. Not a deterrent, some say. The
January/February 2001 issue of _Alberta News_ story \'Banff\'s very public
library\' by Shelley Mardiros tells how Banff removed the fee and had three
times as many new members as in the previous January:
Full Story

On the following pages in the print version someone sent me is \'Book angel:
taking the spirit of reading to the back roads in a blue Chevy Astro\' by
Dan Rubenstein. The story is about seventy-on-year-old Kathleen Evans who
provides reading material to rural kids, on her own time and at her own
expense. I can\'t seem to find this story in the electronic version, but I
recommend it - we always need that warm fuzzy counterpoint to the filtering
and e-book stories.

Top Censored Library Stories of 1998/2000

Sanford Berman, one of the 20th Century\'s library heroes, wrote a summary of the past three years\' Top Five Censored Library Stories, in the style of Project Censored\'s annual collections of the most significant news stories that were suppressed by the corporate media. Sandy\'s piece was originally written for the print journal The U*N*A*B*A*S*H*E*D L*I*B*R*A*R*I*A*N and was republished on the web in this week\'s Library Juice. Sanford Berman is co-editor of the biennial anthology Alternative Library Literature, published by McFarland.


E-Ink: Re-Inking the Culture of the Book

D.T. Max writes, in The Last Book, \"If computers finally replace trusted hardcovers and paperbacks, will our culture ever be the same?\" [more...] from The Utne Reader.


Filtering Round Up

COPPA Given Mixed First-Year Revue

A report released today by the Center for Media Education (CME), a non-profit organization monitoring online content aimed at children, said that in its first year of application, the Children\'s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) wrought positive changes but the industry is falling short of complying with privacy provisions. [more...] from NewsBytes.

More Fun With Studies

The PIP recently released the results of a rather uninteresting study that was reported almost everywhere for some reason.

They asked \"How concenered are you about the following types of internet crime\", and \"Which one of these types of Internet crimes converns you the MOST\".

From those 2 questions they draw this conclusion:
\"... and 50% of Americans cite child porn as the single most heinous crime that takes place online\"
Did I miss something there?
The #1 answer in to both questions was Child Pornography, but how did they arrive at that conclusion?

SiliconValley.com put it best when they said, \"People least worried about big Internet risk\".

eMarketer.com has a the Report broken down with lots of nifty charts and grafts.
So what have we learned here?
People worry about child pornogrphy [Which is horrible, awful and should be illegal, but doesn\'t come after you and steal your stuff], meanwhile they\'re being DOS\'d, or a Cracker [Note: not Hacker] just grabbed their credit card numbers.

If you are so inclined, you can actually go Read The Full Report.


Life is a library, and you are allowed to talk!

Mary Abdoney has this interesting story to share, she writes:

\"I have a story to share with you, however. I\'m sure you have seen the
very imaginative ads for Cingular wireless service. When the ads first
started, I absolutely fell in love with them and thought they deserved
an award. Until yesterday.

As I was driving in my car in the North Tampa area with my mother, we
spotted a billboard with that familiar little orange guy and his (or
her?) quotation bubble. The quotation is what got me; it read \"Life is
not a library. You\'re allowed to talk.\"



Lilbrary Funding Updates

The Daily Star has some Good News from Senator Charles Schumer.
\"America\'s neglected libraries are crumbling,\" Schumer said. \"In a modern world where education is the key to success, our libraries are out of date and out of place.\"

The bad news, passed along by Alison Hendon, is on RIF, she says:
\"We got an email message today at our library telling us that RIF funding was
not included in the federal budget. RIF (as you doubtless know) stands for
Reading Is Fundamental and is a program that gives away books to children as
a reward for reading. It is usually run through schools and libraries.
This is from Here


Web Freedom Lost

CNET has This Story that says A combination of new technologies, recent laws and international restrictions--sometimes related, more often not--are making possible a kind of online regulation once thought impossible.

Meanwhile, More than 60 federal Web sites violate U.S. privacy rules by using unauthorized software to track the browsing and buying habits of Internet users, according to a congressional report, Full Story @ CNN

The BBC simply says \"Cybercops arrest online liberty\"
This Story on your slowly eroding freedoms online.

Wired takes a look at a different kind of censorship in This Story on the increasing power of corporations.


If you open, they will come ...

Brian writes \"A library in Florida tries out Sunday hours and discovers that people come in and check out books. Story in the St. Petersburg Times.\"

And a completely unrelated story from NY has the memebers of New York City\'s largest librarians\' union getting a 16% raise. They [City Hall] had to defend the unusually large raises by saying they are having \"extraordinary\" problems with recruiting and retaining librarians See the NYTimes Story.

It\'s official: public libraries in Oz are for rec

Steve Benson writes \"A comprehensive survey of user satisfaction in public libraries in New South Wales has found that the greatest appeal of their services is for recreation and fun. The survey was done on 15,000 library visitors and the results are detailed in this this Sydney Morning Herald article \"

I wonder if this would be any different in other countries?

Budget Would Eliminate National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

When he was a congressman in 1970, George Bush voted to create the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. Now, his son wants to eliminate it. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.



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