The End of the Net

MSNBC has an Interview with Lawrence Lessig who argues huge corporations are ruining the Internet.
In “The Future of Ideas” he warns that the Net is in danger of being controlled by special interests who will not only take our dollars but limit our speech and our ability to produce creative works.

\"What’s surprising to me is that there’s been very little reflection on the importance of maintaining balance, and the dangers of this very strong protection, where dinosaurs get to protect themselves against innovation.\"

Seems like a funny place to have an interview on this topic, eh? They mention AOL Time Warner, but not MSFT.

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Creating a Welcoming Atmosphere in the Library is Important

It\'s always nice to read about people in the library profession who go the extra distance to make a lasting impression, especially on kids. According to Noni St. Amand, school media specialist, \"Kids should be excited about reading\" During the course of her career, she has stressed the importance of promoting reading among children. One of the ways she\'s chosen to accomplish this is making sure she reads every book, that comes into her library, before it\'s shelved. More

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Images of the Librarian

I\'ve collected a few links on librarian stereotypes, and images to share with ya\'ll...

Stereotypes is part of IMAGE AND THE LIBRARIAN

THE LIBRARIAN STEREOTYPE AND THE MOVIES

The Image of the Librarian in Fiction

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Simon & Schuster helps kill publishing deal

Charlotte.com is running This AP Story on Simon & Schuster killing a deal between RosettaBooks, a start-up e-book publisher, and iBooks.
They sued Rosetta for copyright infringement for gaining electronic rights and offering versions of Kurt Vonnegut\'s \"Slaughterhouse-Five\" and seven other works the publisher had issued in paper form.

\"It hurts the authors and it hurts the reading public\'s opportunity to enjoy these books,\" Klebanoff said.

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Book Hunting Made Easier

Here\'s another article listing web sites for hard-to-find books. Some of the links are familiar, but there are a couple that I hadn\'t heard of before. More from The International Herald Tribune.

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Flap Over Phalluses Has Library In Limelight

Bob Cox sent along This One on Boulder\'s self-proclaimed \"dildo bandito\", took responsibility for removing 21 colorful ceramic penis sculptures that, prior to Saturday, hung in the library art gallery.

This Story also has a some pictures of the display, sponsored by the library and the Boulder County Safehouse, a non-profit group for battered women and children.

\"I would say that people should be more angry about the statistics that have been placed on the wall,\" a library patron told 7NEWS.\"

Alabama To Place Disclaimer On Books

This Findlaw Story, sent in By James Nimmo, says Alabama is maintaining its distinction as the only state where biology textbooks include a sticker warning students that evolution is a \"controversial theory\" they should question.

The statement says in part that evolution is \"a controversial theory. ... Instructional material associated with controversy should be approached with an open mind, studied carefully, and critically considered.\"

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U of T\'s porn test

Bob Cox sent along This Story from The Toronto Star on the largest collections of modern pornography in Canada now being cataloged at the University of Toronto, \"behind a door marked Do Not Enter — Alarmed Directly To The Toronto Police Service\".

Its acquisition makes U of T the first Canadian institution to own such materials, though the academic study of smut is well advanced in many places of higher learning in the United States.

\"Some of it is from Italy and goes back to the earliest days of filmmaking — there\'s one that I\'m guessing is from 1910 or 1915 because it\'s very jerky,\" says the professor. \"Oh, I guess I shouldn\'t use that word.\"

Caffeinating Library Gate Count

Hermit;-) adds some more on the empty library problem\"The Chronicle has an article lamenting student\'s decreasing attendance at libraries and voicing the familiar debate \"about what the rise of databases and the decline of reading rooms means for academics.\"
It mentions some of the things directors are doing to draw patrons back into the brick and mortar including using \"sofas-and-lattes\". The colloquy section asks the question \"Should college libraries try to attract more students by opening coffee bars and cafes?\"
Thursday, Nov. 15, 2 p.m. U.S. Eastern time is a \"live, online discussion\": \"Are College Libraries Too Empty?\" w/ the presidents of the ACRL & CLIR\"

The Deserted Library

Martin Raish writes \"As academic libraries spend more money on electronic resources, and less on \"traditional\" materials, our students are spending less time in the reading room and more in the computer labs. \"The shift leaves many librarians and scholars wondering and worrying about the future of what has traditionally been the social and intellectual heart of campus, as well as about whether students are learning differently now -- or learning at all,\" says Scott Carlson.

Chronicle of Higher Education, 16 November \"

Look Who\'s Reading

Lee Hadden writes: \" An article in the Wall Street Journal, Nov. 9, 2001, pages W1 and W4, is
about the amazing increase in book reading and buying among the under-25
crowd. After the flop of the Internet hype, book-reading is becoming a cool
thing for the younger set. Show your \"cool\" by supporting your \"inner
bookworm.\" Also, some books are used as an accessory to clothing- as a
fashion statement. Read more about it in the article by Pooja Bhatia, \"Look
Who\'s Reading Now: Under-25 Crowd is Purchasing Books in Record Numbers;
Faulkner as a Fashion Statement\".\"

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Cyber-sleuths demand new powers

James Nimmo passed along This Story from over at Findlaw on the seizure of a suspect\'s personal computer for the purpose of dissecting the hard drive for possible clues or motives.

FBI agents did just that in the days after the September 11 plane hijack attacks on America, when they confiscated two computers from a Delray Beach, Florida public library that were allegedly used by suspects.

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SAA Responds to Presidential Paper Restrictions

An excerpt from SAA President Steve Hensen\'s letter to Congress:

I write to express the grave concern of the Society of American Archivists with respect to the President’s recent Executive Order 13233 on Presidential Papers . . .

Our apprehension over this Executive Order is on several levels. First, it violates both the spirit and letter of existing U.S. law on access to presidential papers . . . This law establishes the principle that presidential records are the property of the United States government and that the management and custody of, as well as access to, such records should be governed by the Archivist of the United States and established archival principles—all within the statutory framework of the act itself. The Executive Order puts the responsibility for these decisions with the President, and indeed with any sitting President into the future. Access to the vital historical records of this nation should not be governed by executive decree; this is why the existing law was created . . .

Second, on a broader level this Executive Order potentially threatens to undermine one of the very foundations of our nation. Free and open access to information is the cornerstone to modern democratic societies around the world . . .

More. Thanks to librarian.net.

Confessions of a serial Library Fine Payer

greenbaynewschron.com is running a Funny Little Story on returning your books late.

\"There should be an \"Overdue Friends of the Library\" club.
This club is exclusively for those of us who so love the library that we
cannot tear ourselves away from their materials in due time. We will
be revered not only for our dedication to reading, but for our
diligence in coming in and paying our overdue fines.
\"

Planning for Diversity

From the new issue of Today\'s Librarian:

In a community where 93 percent of the population is White, implementing a diversity plan hardly seems a necessity. Especially one that costs tens of thousands of dollars. But administrators at Ocean County (NJ) Public Library saw those in the minority population as an integral part of the library community. Five years ago, they made it their mission to reach out and welcome them . . .

Introducing more diversity into the library had been on Jean Vogrin\'s mind for years. As director of Ocean County\'s Barnegat Branch, Vogrin tapped into minority communities by bringing in speakers and adding ethnic programming . . .

More.

Random House Shuttering E-book Imprint

Tanya writes \"Another sign that E-books were not the next big thing they were supposed to be.
\"
Stories from The NYTimes.com and CNET on Random House Trade Group folding its e-book imprint, \"AtRandom\", due to scant consumer demand for books that can be read on screens, they company will continue to publish electronic versions of books.

Why is V.S. Naipaul so cranky?

Today\'s Chicago Tribune has a brief profile of the writer who won the Nobel Prize for Literature last month.

"A good audience is good. But what is most enervating is when I have little regard for the audience."

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Yahoo! for free speech

Ready for the World writes \"A Federal Judge ruled on WEdnesday, November 7, 2001 that the French courts cannot impose regulations or restrictions on U.S. based Yahoo. The French had argued that since the internet sites can be viewed in France that they must follow the ban on talk and sale of anything Nazi related. The U.S. Federal Court ruled that the \"United States Constitution\'s protections of free speech trumped a French order requiring Yahoo to remove Nazi materials from its Web site\". Find out more in the NYTimes \"

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Harry preps kids for Antichrist

Associated Press has another story about some conservative American Christians complaining that Harry Potter is an introduction to evil.

Besides emphasizing that this view is outside the Christian mainstream, this one also has some fun bits: A pagan says that people in his movement think the Potter books are "rather uncool," and a particularly ridiculous image on one anti-Potter website is mentioned.

A related item: A Sunday morning program at Unity Church in Chicago is supposed to examine parallels between the Harry Potter books and Bible passages.

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There is no Genealogy Fairy

Bob Cox sent along This Story from SP Times.com on the great Genealogical volunteers who make all those great resources available.

\"I volunteer because I remember all the help other people have been to me, especially when I first got started. It is a wonderful feeling to know you have helped someone to connect to their roots. It\'s like being a Sherlock Holmes every day.\"

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