Remembering The Book Ban Case of 76

Newsday.com has A Story on the 1976 book-banning that became the basis for a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding students\' rights.

In 1982, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited public school officials\' authority to remove books they find offensive from school libraries.

\"There\'s always going to be censorship,\" said Steven Pico, who as a 17-year-old
junior at Island Trees High School became the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. \"That\'s
why there always needs to be people to resist the pressure.\"

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Librarian Recognized for Inspiring Others

The librarian at the Golden Valley High School in California is receiving the prestigious President\'s Award from the California School Library Association for her outstanding contribution and dedication to the field, as well as her ability to inspire others. Her philosophy is to do whatever it takes to get kids into the library. Even if it means delivering their books to them. more... from The Modesto Bee.

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Library Collects Nearly $20,000 in Late Fees

As long as there are libraries, there will be overdue books.
The Muscle Shoals Library District in Alabama has accumulated nearly $20K in late fees this year. That\'s more than some libraries have in their entire book budget. I like the statement in the article about patrons setting their own due dates. I realize this might not be big news to everyone, but sheesh, my first professional library job only paid that much! more... from the Times Daily.

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Commemorating the Infamous Island Trees Book Ban of \'76

From Newsday, someone has written an article about the famous book ban of \'76 that resulted in a Supreme Court decision limiting the authority of school officials to ban material on the basis that they find it personally offensive. more...

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Censorship in wake of terror attacks

stuart yeates writes \"
The BBC is carrying a story about how ``information about hazardous chemicals\'\' is being pulled from websites in the name of national security. There appears to be very little assessment of whether this censorship could be counterproductive, in that it lowers the threat visability and thus preparedness. It also fails to mention that many of the pages are cached on Google\" and similar engines.
\"

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Ann Arbor librarians, staff picketing over pay, schedules

From the Ann Arbor News, library staff picketed all day
today.

\"The library workers, represented by the Ann Arbor Education
Association and the Michigan Education Association, dispute the
library management\'s contention that librarians are overpaid when
compared to other libraries in the market.\"

Full Story

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Egyptian man asking about water system scares Stark librarian

The Plain Dealer from Cleveland reports about research
done at
a local library. The librarian said it was research about diseases
transferred between animals and humans.

\"She remembered that the man said he was from Egypt and had
come to the area to work at Case Farms, a chicken farm in nearby
Holmes County. He also wanted information about water treatment
systems and diseases that could be transferred between humans and
animals.

Fearful, the librarian told her supervisor and the supervisor called
the county prosecutor and the local FBI office Sept. 12 or Sept. 13.
\"

Full
Story

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Time for a Net obituary or a celebration?

Mefi pointed me to This Awesome little OP-ED piece from Roger
Ebert.

He sums up what\'s going on very well, I think. He says all
is well with the web, I just hope he\'s right.

\"The Internet Bubble has been compared to the Tulip
Craze, when 17th-century investors bid the price of Dutch
bulbs to insane heights. Both bubbles burst. The collapse of
the Internet economy was inevitable, and clears the way for
sane and reasonable rebuilding. Good news: There are more
tulips in the world than ever before

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Cuban Libraries Under the Embargo

Eliades Acosta Matos, director of the José Martí National Library, reports on Cuban libraries under the embargo:

The cost of the embargo to the cultural life of the Cuban nation is immense and difficult to reduce to numbers. Still, it can be gleaned from the difficulties we face in acquiring the paper we need to print books, magazines and journals, and in obtaining the oil we need to generate the electricity that ensures, for instance, that our public libraries are not forced to reduce their evening hours . . . Of course, other technologies as well, computers, photocopy machines, microfilm readers, television sets or music players, items essential to the daily operation of any library, also face these same travel-related restrictions. And how could there be a normal and fluid exchange between Cuban and American colleagues when U. S. citizens face a fine of up to 250,000 dollars and ten years imprisonment if they travel, for instance, to a library conference in Cuba without first obtaining a license from the U. S. Treasury Department?

More from Movable Type. Thanks to librarian.net.

Will the Scientific Paper Keep its Form?

Joost G. Kircz envisions a hybrid future for the scientific literature:

Discussion about the value of electronic documents is often hampered by starting from what is usual in the paper world and attempting to impose that on an electronic environment. In order to grasp the impact of the current electronic revolution, and formulate a policy for the future, we examine the aims and content of scientific communication. We then critically discuss the recommendations of an International Working Group [see Learned Publishing 2000:13(4) Oct. 251-8], and show the tension between these very reasonable recommendations and the reality of electronic publishing. We conclude that the scientific article will change considerably but that, in its new more composite form as an ensemble of various textual and non-textual components, it will retain many of the current cultural and scientific requirements with regard to editorial, quality and integrity.

More (as either a RealPage or PDF file) from Learned Publishing.

\"Literature in Context\'\' Web Resource Will Help Chicagoans Understand Book

A neat web site for learning about literary classics.
From the press release:
\"While Chicagoans are reading To Kill a Mockingbird next week
during the city\'s ``One Book One Chicago\'\' program, they\'ll have an
award-winning resource at their public libraries that helps them to
understand the historical and social context in which the book was
written in the 1950s. \"

See the FULL
STORY
to learn how to access the site.

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Dublin Core Metadata Element Set Approved

Bethesda, Md., USA – (October 5, 2001) NISO, the National Information
Standards Organization and the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)
announce the approval by ANSI of the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set
(Z39.85-2001). DCMI began in 1995 with an invitational workshop in Dublin,
Ohio that brought together librarians, digital library researchers, content
providers, and text-markup experts to improve discovery standards for
information resources. The original Dublin Core emerged as a small set of
descriptors that quickly drew global interest from a wide variety of
information providers in the arts, sciences, education, business, and
government sectors.


This standard is available for free downloading or hardcopy purchase at:
techstreet.com

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The Effects of September 11 on Google

FirstMonday has an Interesting Story on Gooooogle and how they handled things on September, 11th.

They say this may have also changed how Google thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.


See also Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines and Search Resources About Terrorist Attacks both from Search Engine Watch

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Stripping off for literature

Jay passed along A little Friday Funny courtesy of The Naked Novelist.They asked which authors would people would most like to see in the nude, and which would they would least like to see in the nude.
Jeffrey Archer was the author they would least like to see naked, strangely Frank McCourt, the author of Angela\'s Ashes had 821 votes to get naked.
Julie Burchill, author of Naked Ambition, came in First Place, In second place was JK Rowling (Two people suggested that they would like to see her wearing nothing but a wizard\'s hat). David Baddiel, the comedian and author of Time for Bed, was the most voted for man.


Google Images is a good place to see what JK, Julie, and David look like with their clothes on.

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A Triple Shot of Harry Potter

All of these are from Ananova(she\'ll read you the news)
Not just for book reports anymore, the Harry Potter books were the subject of a thesis at Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education by Michele Fry. Ms. Fry\'s paper has been accepted for publication in the New Review of Children\'s Literature and Librarianship Her conclusion? That the books should be called the Hermione Granger books- she\'s the real heroine.
It\'s True! Harry Potter is about real wizardry Students in Austria attend a six term Hexenschule to learn \"ancestral wizardry.\"
At 2 hours and 23 minutes, Harry\'s new movie too short

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Books outweigh food in convoy to famine area

This story from The Herald in the UK, reports that UN aid
near the
Afgan border is pouring..well, trotting in by donkey. But much of the
last shipment was books rather than food.
\"What were in most of the boxes? I asked one of the drivers.
\"Ketab,\" he replied, using the Dari word for books.

Some 204,000 books, educational aids, and stationery made up the
bulk of the consignment. Of about 220 tons, only six consisted of food,
a high protein porridge called Unimix.

\"Believe me when I say we are grateful for the books and the
possibility of some education for our children, but it is difficult to go
to school when you are weak or dead from hunger,\" said Haji
Mohammed, an Afghan refugee man from the Panjshir valley, who
was standing nearby. He explained, and apologised at the same time:
\"Books are important, but these things, the food, warm clothes and
medicines, are what will see us through this winter.\"

Full Story

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FOOLs lead learning at library

OK, I posted this one because the title caught me eye and it made
me chuckle when I read it....see what you think. :-) From the
Oakmont Advance Leader Star:
\"It\'s not too late to become a FOOL. More FOOLs are needed to
continue bringing fun and learning to the children of Oakmont,
Verona and surrounding communities. \"

Full
Story

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A tale of two Harry Potters in Jacksonville FL

The Associated Press reports that Duval County School District has decided to require a permission slip signed by a parent before any student can check out Harry Potter books. But that\'s not the end of this story...

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National Library warns after losing 25,000 items

The Toronto Star and The National Post are both running stories on the National Library in Canada being in very rough shape. The library\'s entire newspaper collection is deteriorating in the basement, and About 25,000 items have been lost in 68 environmental accidents.

\"Sometimes, it doesn\'t look like a national library,\" he said. \"Since 1993, we\'ve suffered almost 70 accidents: flooding, leaks, pipes that have blown up. Since last January, we have gone through 10 accidents.\'\'

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Market Yourself Online!

InfoToday has a Nifty Story by Rachel and Sarah the Library Job Experts on advancing your own career in the library field, online. You may also want to check out their Up Coming Book, \"The Information Professional\'s Guide to Career Development Online\"

Good stuff to know if you need to get your name out there.

\"The online environment offers tremendous potential for librarians interested in professional development, whether it be by staying in touch with colleagues, creating an online resource or resume, or finding a new job. If you\'re comfortable interacting online, you\'ll find it easy to establish a network of associates—and a set of skills—that will be helpful in all stages of your career.\"

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