The trouble with casting Harry Potter

If you know Hagrid, The Dursleys, Hogwarts and everyone from the Harry Potter series, then This Story from The Sun Sentinel will interest you. They have the run down on who you\'ll see when Harry Potter and the Sorcerer\'s Stone opens Nov. 16, and I know you\'ll be there opening night!


And speaking of Harry, Potter publisher Bloomsbury Publishing has reported a doubling in first-half sales and said it expected a dramatic rise in sales as the fictional boy wizard makes his film debut. Full Story, I guess his magical powers include creating money.

Topic: 

NY Times blacklists Tasini supporters

Fiona writes \"Village Voice reports that writers who were plaintiffs in the New York Times vs Tasini case have been blacklisted by the Times. The names of 13 writers are on the list. Nice to see that the paper has resolved this issue constructively!

More Here \"

Library \'Blogs in the News

Marylaine Block has written a relatively high profile piece on library weblogs in which our own Blake Carver is quoted:

For many of the self-publishers, it\'s a chance to render a service, to fill a hole in the web of information. Jenny Levine was one of the first to do this, back in 1995, with her late lamented Librarians\' Site du Jour. \"I began it to bring home to the librarians in my system the power of this new tool,\" she says. \"The two biggest complaints I heard about the net were that people didn\'t have time for this new stuff, and, even if they did, they didn\'t know what to do once they got online. So my goal was twofold: 1) to highlight valuable resources, and 2) to give librarians a reason to go on the web every day . . . \"

More from Library Journal (registration required.)

Topic: 

ALA Post 9/11 Patron Confidentiality Q&A Available

ALA\'s \"Q&A on the confidentiality and privacy of library records\" is available:

What guidance does the American Library Association give libraries regarding privacy and confidentiality?

The American Library Association encourages all librarians, particularly those in public libraries, to work with their local legal counsel to ensure they understand state confidentiality laws so they may respond quickly to any requests from law enforcement. Forty-eight of 50 states have such laws on the books, but the language varies from state to state. The ALA recommends that each library adopt a policy that specifically recognizes the confidentiality of information sought or received, and materials consulted borrowed or acquired by a library user. These materials may include database search records, circulation records, interlibrary loan records and other personally identifiable uses of library materials, facilities, programs or services, such as reference interviews. Libraries are advised to rely on existing laws to control behavior that involves public safety or criminal behavior.

Libraries should have in place procedures for working with law enforcement officers when a subpoena or other legal order for records is made. Libraries will cooperate expeditiously with law enforcement within the framework of state law.

Links to other relevant ALA documents, including the \"Policy Concerning Confidentiality of Personally Identifiable Information about Library Users\" are included.

Topic: 

World Trade Center Virus Update

Last week I reported on the WTC virus that was spreading. There\'s been an update posted. The good news is that it spreads slowly. The bad news is that it will attempt to delete your Windows directory files and reformat your hard drive. More information is available Here. The original LISNews posting is Here.

Topic: 

Academic Libraries Take An E-Look at E-Books

Academic Libraries Take An E-Look at E-Books is a project by Spoon River College and Eureka College.

They applied for an Educate and Automate Innovative grant from the Illinois State Library, and bought some eBooks to see what would happen.

The purpose of this web page is to share the experiences of the students, instructors, and librarians during this project.

Arthur\'s Neat New Digs

From URLWire:
\"Everyone’s favorite aardvark has a new online look this season. Parents, teachers, and especially kids will want to check out the Season Six Arthur Web site at www.pbskids.org/arthur. Already considered one of the top children’s destinations on the Internet, the Arthur Web site has added a bevy of new features to the site and made the navigation even more kid friendly.\" Check it out at http://pbskids.org/arthur/

Topic: 

Suggested reading to understand crisis

The Seattle Times has A Nice List of books recommended by By Mary Ann Gwinn the Seattle Times book editor.

So if you\'re looking for books that may help you understand the 9/11 events, check out these books on Islam, the Middle East, terrorism, American foreign policy and other topics.

Topic: 

Library to be Renamed for Community Activist

Going against the wishes of the library commission, the San Jose, CA city council voted to rename the Empire Library after the wife of late jazz great Duke Ellington because of her civic activities. The decision is causing a stir, however, because there is a policy that discourages naming public institutions after living people. more... from The Mercury News.

Topic: 

Libraries Plan Reading of Banned Books

In light of the recent terrorist attacks on our nation\'s freedom, the Farmington, ME Public Library and the University of Maine have joined forces to promote the reading of banned books. The following state appears on the library association\'s web site: \"At a time when terrorists have attacked our country, America\'s freedoms could be in jeopardy as well. This library is is proud to celebrate one of those freedoms — the freedom to read.\"
more... from Maine Today.

Topic: 

OCLC Seeks $30 Million to Upgrade

OCLC is seeking $30 million to upgrade its infrastructure and to give itself more room to grow. According to OCLC, 2,000 to 3,000 new libraries froim around the world come on board each year. more... from GCBA.

Topic: 

Open Source VRD Software Available

Rob Casson, electronic information services librarian at Miami University, is offering RAKIM - a software package he has developed that enables live, online, chat-based reference service - for free downloading. An excerpt from his 9/21/01 posting to the DIG_REF listserv:

Here is a brief rundown of features:

*unlimited number of operators/librarians
*librarian-patron chat
*page-push
*shared queue of patrons
*ability to refer patrons to other librarians (personal queue)
*shared/personal bookmarks
*email transcripts to patrons
*audible alert to librarian when new patron arrives
*audible alert to patron when their call is answered
*editable preferences for librarians
*browser-based - no plugins (except to play alerts, and this can be turned off)
*needs frames/javascript/css; right now, this means Netscape 4.X and IE, but support for Mozilla (and its offspring) . . .
*relational database backend . . . any relational database that PHP can connect to can be used to run the software . . .
*its Free software....Free, as in speech, and free, as in beer.

I thought people on this list might be interested in a Free alternative to the LSSI\'s of the world . . . it may not have all the features
of some of the commercial products, but its also a very young project, and the source code is available, just waiting for others to tear it apart, fix it, add to it, or ignore it and write your own . . . ;)

For more information, see the RAKIM home page.

Topic: 

The changing role of law librarians

The Pittsburg Business Times has a Nice Look at how the law librarian field has changed.

It seems like most of what they say carries over nicely to all areas of librarianship.

\"Computers can do a lot for us, but they can\'t think like we do. There is a certain serendipity when a person sits down with a legal book,\'\' said John DiGilio, a legal and business research librarian at the Downtown law firm of Kirkpatrick & Lockhart L.L.P.\"

Terror Attacks Boost More Book Sales

Cavan McCarthy passed along this Ananova Story on more books that are selling well since last week.
Professor Angus Gillespie\'s Twin Towers: The Life of New York City\'s World Trade Centre, had sold just 2,000 copies before Tuesday and now the remaining 1,000 sold out within 24 hours of the attack. Amazon.com says that Barbara Olson\'s book about Hilary Clinton has sold out (She, Olson, was on one of the hijacked planes).

I assume this is true at libraries as well?

Topic: 

Library of Congress Documenting Public Reaction to 9/11 Attacks

The Library of Congress\' American Folklife Center is leading an effort to document public opinion concerning last Tuesday\'s attacks:

Exactly one week after terrorism struck the country, Rory Turner places his mini-disc recorder and microphone on a counter as construction workers, firefighters, cops, mothers with young children and business professionals grab lunch at the Cross Street Market in South Baltimore.

Turner, a folklorist and program director for the Maryland State Arts Council, finds a relatively quiet corner behind a Chinese food and barbecue stand. He turns to customer Douglas H. Strachan, pastor of St. Paul\'s Lutheran Church in Curtis Bay, and asks how he responded to the attacks. Strachan is happy to share his feelings with a stranger . . .

In the background, vegetables sizzle on the grill and an employee rinses a large colander of noodles. The clanging commotion of the lunch spot is absorbed by Turner\'s recorder, as are Strachan\'s words, so that listeners 100 or 1,000 years from now will know the sounds of lunch in the early 21st century as well as the pastor\'s impressions.

Turner\'s interview with Strachan and others having their noon meal is bound for the permanent collections of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in Washington . . .

More from the Baltimore Sun . A Real Audio file of \"The Day After Pearl Harbor,\" a radio documentary compiled from similar recordings made by the Library of Congress in 1941 (and mentioned in this article) is available here.

Topic: 

Nostradamus Flying Off the Shelves

It seems that books on or by Nostradamus are flying off library shelves in some places. A number of e-mail messages have been surfacing about this attack having been predicted by Nostradamus during the 1500s as the beginning of WW III and or possibly the end of the world. A visit to Urban Legends will yield more information on that and other Internet hoaxes. more...

Topic: 

A Virtual Walk Through Tin Pan Alley

The Chronicle of Higher Ed is reporting on a cool new Online Archive at Mississippi State University\'s Templeton Sheet Music Collection.
The university\'s library is digitizing and conserving the collection, an archive of about 22,000 pieces of ragtime, blues, show-tune, and war-song folios from the 1890s to the Great Depression.

Bay County\'s Sage Branch Library seems to be taking the opposite approach, selling off volumes from the original collection of the library from 1884.

Be Not Proud In This Library

Here\'s and interesting one from News-Press
on a sticky situation at Florida Gulf Coast University.

The head librarian (Director?) asked some employees
to remove “Proud to be an American” stickers this
week, saying she didn’t want to offend international
students.

“My concern was that if a student comes to the
desk and sees the slogan, it might make it
uncomfortable, I think we have an
obligation to think about how we present ourselves. We
want to ensure civility and tolerance.”

Update[Thurs 10:15am] She Said Sorry after the school president rescinded her directive.

Good News Bad News

The Chicago tribune reports
Friends of Sulzer Library filed a suit Tuesday against
the Chicago Public Library Commission seeking a halt
to removal of books from the Sulzer Regional Library.
The library called the book removal a standard
\"weeding\" process common to all large libraries.


The Anchorage Daily News says The
Anchorage School District\'s Controversial Issues
Review Committee voted 10-3 to leave \"It\'s Perfectly
Normal\" on school library shelves.

\"If a child was to copy these illustrations in their
class, they\'d be sent to the principal,\" McNeil said.
\"They\'d probably be suspended.\"

Topic: 

Radio giant encouraging censorship?

This article on Slate.com discusses a \'no-play\' list of songs distributed by Clear Channel Communications in reaction to last week\'s attack. Clear Channel owns and programs air time on over 1000 radio stations in the United States. Metallica\'s \'Seek and Destroy\' is on the list, but so is John Lennon\'s \'Imagine.\' Should this be an individual station decision? Does the company have the right to do this since they are a private, rather than public, entity? Should we tolerate this in light of last week\'s attack? This is an important issue with many intriguing facets. Check out the song list and see what you think.

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS Subscribe to LISNews: - All comments