OCLC Links Catalog with Rare Books Database

In order to assist individuals in locating rare and/or out of print material, OCLC is linking up with Alibris, Inc., a California based rare book database firm. Customers of Alibris will be able to use OCLC\'s World Cat to search for material in libraries. more...


Human chain opens $3M library branch

Phillyburbs.com has This Story on how to spend your Friday.

Head on down to Pemberton, and join in the fun Friday, Oct. 19, when the $3 million library officially opens during a 10 a.m. dedication ceremony. The celebration will feature a human chain of students and residents that will pass books from the nearby Little Red Schoolhouse on Trenton Road into the new building.

Take one down, pass it along, 98 books in the library...

\"We\'re hoping to have as many families as possible participate in the book pass because this will really be a family library,\" Kay said. \"I can\'t wait for everyone in Pemberton to see it.\"

Forum Finds Hope Beyond the Journals Crisis

Library Journal reports (briefly) on the 10/1 Forum on Publishing Alternatives in Science at Johns Hopkins:

\"We gave our intellectual property away to private firms and scholarly societies,\" said David E. Shulenburger, provost of the University of Kansas . . . \"They have found they can sell it back to us at prices that will produce profits and/or support the cost of other activities.\" Shulenburger had the figures to back up the assertions. From 1986 to 1999, the number of journals grew from 103,700 to 161,000 (55 percent). While the Consumer Price Index increased 49 percent in that period and the price of healthcare went up 111 percent, the cost of scholarly journals increased 175 percent.

More (registration required).

Publishers Desert Frankfurt Book Fair

The war is having a significant impact on the publishing world:

The international rights market — the engine that drives [the fair] — is usually booming this time of year. But book submissions, which ground to a halt Sept. 11, have only recently begun to regain momentum, with much of the focus now on books about international affairs, terrorism, spirituality and heroic rescues.

Add heightened flying jitters and inconvenience, and many publishing insiders have concluded that the fair’s business prospects aren’t compelling enough to lure them overseas.

“I’d spent the past three to four months setting up back-to-back meetings over five days,” said agent Rafe Sagalyn, who canceled his trip to the fair. “My family asked me to stay close, a wish that I didn’t have a hard time heeding.”

More from MSNBC.


UCLA Librarian punished for political mass e-mail

Connie from Indiana passed along This One from The Daily Bruin
at UCLA on a librarian punished for a political mass e-mail.

The librarians e-mail was cited as being in violation of university library policy, which prohibits unsolicited messages containing political, religious or patriotic messages to be sent to library department lists. They said \"Your recent e-mail, which was distributed to the entire unit, demonstrated a lack of sensitivity that went beyond incivility and became harassment,\" and that if he did not improve his behavior, \"further disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, will result.\"


Coca-Cola Launching Harry Potter Campaign

Coca-Cola will be featuring Harry Potter\'s mug on 850 million Coke, Hi-C, and Minute Maid products as part of a campaign intended to boost literacy, as well as sales. Prizes will be awarded to consumers, which include movie tickets and trips to England. more...


Editorial Board of the Machine Learning Journal Steps Down

Slashdot pointed the way to this most excellent letter of resignation from Machine Learning journal Editorial Board. Forty people have resigned from the Editorial Board of the Machine Learning Journal (MLJ). They say when the journal started fifteen years ago research papers did not circulate easily, but now, articles circulate easily via the Internet. They gone on to say MLJ publications are under restricted access, because universities and research centers pay a yearly fee of $1050. This works to limit contact between the current machine learning community and the potentially much larger community of researchers. They also point out none of the revenue stream from the journal makes its way back to
authors. They see little benefit for a mechanism that ensures revenue for a third party by restricting the communication channel between authors and readers.

Great to see this, I only hope we see it more often!

Remembering The Book Ban Case of 76

Newsday.com has A Story on the 1976 book-banning that became the basis for a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding students\' rights.

In 1982, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited public school officials\' authority to remove books they find offensive from school libraries.

\"There\'s always going to be censorship,\" said Steven Pico, who as a 17-year-old
junior at Island Trees High School became the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. \"That\'s
why there always needs to be people to resist the pressure.\"


Librarian Recognized for Inspiring Others

The librarian at the Golden Valley High School in California is receiving the prestigious President\'s Award from the California School Library Association for her outstanding contribution and dedication to the field, as well as her ability to inspire others. Her philosophy is to do whatever it takes to get kids into the library. Even if it means delivering their books to them. more... from The Modesto Bee.


Library Collects Nearly $20,000 in Late Fees

As long as there are libraries, there will be overdue books.
The Muscle Shoals Library District in Alabama has accumulated nearly $20K in late fees this year. That\'s more than some libraries have in their entire book budget. I like the statement in the article about patrons setting their own due dates. I realize this might not be big news to everyone, but sheesh, my first professional library job only paid that much! more... from the Times Daily.


Commemorating the Infamous Island Trees Book Ban of \'76

From Newsday, someone has written an article about the famous book ban of \'76 that resulted in a Supreme Court decision limiting the authority of school officials to ban material on the basis that they find it personally offensive. more...


Censorship in wake of terror attacks

stuart yeates writes \"
The BBC is carrying a story about how ``information about hazardous chemicals\'\' is being pulled from websites in the name of national security. There appears to be very little assessment of whether this censorship could be counterproductive, in that it lowers the threat visability and thus preparedness. It also fails to mention that many of the pages are cached on Google\" and similar engines.


Ann Arbor librarians, staff picketing over pay, schedules

From the Ann Arbor News, library staff picketed all day

\"The library workers, represented by the Ann Arbor Education
Association and the Michigan Education Association, dispute the
library management\'s contention that librarians are overpaid when
compared to other libraries in the market.\"

Full Story


Egyptian man asking about water system scares Stark librarian

The Plain Dealer from Cleveland reports about research
done at
a local library. The librarian said it was research about diseases
transferred between animals and humans.

\"She remembered that the man said he was from Egypt and had
come to the area to work at Case Farms, a chicken farm in nearby
Holmes County. He also wanted information about water treatment
systems and diseases that could be transferred between humans and

Fearful, the librarian told her supervisor and the supervisor called
the county prosecutor and the local FBI office Sept. 12 or Sept. 13.



Time for a Net obituary or a celebration?

Mefi pointed me to This Awesome little OP-ED piece from Roger

He sums up what\'s going on very well, I think. He says all
is well with the web, I just hope he\'s right.

\"The Internet Bubble has been compared to the Tulip
Craze, when 17th-century investors bid the price of Dutch
bulbs to insane heights. Both bubbles burst. The collapse of
the Internet economy was inevitable, and clears the way for
sane and reasonable rebuilding. Good news: There are more
tulips in the world than ever before


Cuban Libraries Under the Embargo

Eliades Acosta Matos, director of the José Martí National Library, reports on Cuban libraries under the embargo:

The cost of the embargo to the cultural life of the Cuban nation is immense and difficult to reduce to numbers. Still, it can be gleaned from the difficulties we face in acquiring the paper we need to print books, magazines and journals, and in obtaining the oil we need to generate the electricity that ensures, for instance, that our public libraries are not forced to reduce their evening hours . . . Of course, other technologies as well, computers, photocopy machines, microfilm readers, television sets or music players, items essential to the daily operation of any library, also face these same travel-related restrictions. And how could there be a normal and fluid exchange between Cuban and American colleagues when U. S. citizens face a fine of up to 250,000 dollars and ten years imprisonment if they travel, for instance, to a library conference in Cuba without first obtaining a license from the U. S. Treasury Department?

More from Movable Type. Thanks to librarian.net.

Will the Scientific Paper Keep its Form?

Joost G. Kircz envisions a hybrid future for the scientific literature:

Discussion about the value of electronic documents is often hampered by starting from what is usual in the paper world and attempting to impose that on an electronic environment. In order to grasp the impact of the current electronic revolution, and formulate a policy for the future, we examine the aims and content of scientific communication. We then critically discuss the recommendations of an International Working Group [see Learned Publishing 2000:13(4) Oct. 251-8], and show the tension between these very reasonable recommendations and the reality of electronic publishing. We conclude that the scientific article will change considerably but that, in its new more composite form as an ensemble of various textual and non-textual components, it will retain many of the current cultural and scientific requirements with regard to editorial, quality and integrity.

More (as either a RealPage or PDF file) from Learned Publishing.

\"Literature in Context\'\' Web Resource Will Help Chicagoans Understand Book

A neat web site for learning about literary classics.
From the press release:
\"While Chicagoans are reading To Kill a Mockingbird next week
during the city\'s ``One Book One Chicago\'\' program, they\'ll have an
award-winning resource at their public libraries that helps them to
understand the historical and social context in which the book was
written in the 1950s. \"

See the FULL
to learn how to access the site.


Dublin Core Metadata Element Set Approved

Bethesda, Md., USA – (October 5, 2001) NISO, the National Information
Standards Organization and the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)
announce the approval by ANSI of the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set
(Z39.85-2001). DCMI began in 1995 with an invitational workshop in Dublin,
Ohio that brought together librarians, digital library researchers, content
providers, and text-markup experts to improve discovery standards for
information resources. The original Dublin Core emerged as a small set of
descriptors that quickly drew global interest from a wide variety of
information providers in the arts, sciences, education, business, and
government sectors.

This standard is available for free downloading or hardcopy purchase at:


The Effects of September 11 on Google

FirstMonday has an Interesting Story on Gooooogle and how they handled things on September, 11th.

They say this may have also changed how Google thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.

See also Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines and Search Resources About Terrorist Attacks both from Search Engine Watch



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