Give the Gift of Reading

For The Mercury News, someone writes...
\"Of all the gifts I will buy this holiday season, none will be as rewarding as the gift of reading: a book for an underprivileged child. I\'ll never meet the kid who receives it. I won\'t be there when he turns the first page. And someone else will see him smile. But I know this much: I\'ll be smiling anyway. When you give a book to Gift of Reading, it doesn\'t just go under the Christmas tree with the toys. They go to reading programs at libraries, schools, homeless shelters and other social service agencies. These groups distribute the books to children. They also teach parents, some of whom barely can read themselves, how to read to their children. When you give the gift of reading, you also are helping to end the cycle of illiteracy.\" More

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Computers Have Had Little Impact in College Classrooms

The Chronicle of Higher Ed. has A Story on the large investment that American education has made in computers and technology -- and the reasons that those innovations have been underutilized in the classroom.

Oversold and Underused is the book by Larry Cuban they discuss.

See Also: small story on Clifford Stoll and a speech he gave up in Buffalo.

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Linux Lass To The Rescue

JoyOfTech ran a Funny Little Cartoon that brings together my 2 joys in life, Librarianship, and Open Source.

It\'s called Linux Lass, Super Linux Evangelist, Defender of GNU and the Open Source Way.

Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3

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Democracy and Scientific Publishing

The Chronicle of Higher Ed. is reporting on a new site called faculty of 1000 that has 1,400 biologists who volunteered to rates the quality of scientific papers in the life sciences by essentially allowing them to vote on which papers they think are most interesting.
Full Story, and also check out The Faculty of 1000 Site.

Preservation: Clean & Restore

SmartRat writes \"They are piecing together history at Cleveland Public Library, not to
mention slicing, gluing and bathing it.\" Thus begins a story Story
about the CPL Preservation Dept., housed in a former high school girl\'s locker room.
Apparently, they go more for the \"clean and restore\" option here in Cleveland rather then
the \"slash and film\" technique so condemned by Nicholas Baker, although mention is made of microfilming periodicals. However, there are many interesting details to be fround here on preservation techniques used in the CPL Preservation Dept. The story is from the
Nov. 13, 2001 Cleveland Plain Dealer, and their online verion at cleveland.com/plaindealer (story archive available for 14 days). \"

Half Price Tix For Librarians

Cris Buchner writes: \"The producers of the Off-Broadway play, \"Underneath the Lintel,\" are offering 1/2 price tickets for librarians. Call 212-691-1555 to order.
\"Underneath the Lintel\" is a play like no other: a tantalizing mystery, a clever fable, a captivating tale...all packed into a magical show by Glen Berger. T. Ryder Smith stars as a Dutch librarian who has discovered a book in the overnight slot 113 years overdue. He traces the unusual history of the book, a travel guide that has had some phenomenal travels of its own in its years away from the library. Come join the journey and discover what the New York Times calls \"a wonderful metaphor for life\'s elusive but inextinguishable meaning.\"
lintel.info for more info.
\"

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History\'s Challenge to Laura Bush

Will Laura Bush become to our generation the icon that Eleanor Roosevelt was to hers? After the September terrorist attacks, she emerged on the scene as a gentle figure of motherhood to embrace and comfort a grieving nation. When asked how she perceives her role as First Lady in relation to the likes of Eleanor Roosevelt, Mamie Eisenhower, or Hilarry Clinton, her response was \"I view my role as first lady as Laura Bush.\" When it comes to favorite first ladies, it seems that her place in history has already been written. More

Security and Privacy May No Longer be Compatible Concepts

The sense that citizens can no longer expect a climate of both security and privacy in the U.S. is becoming a great concern for some. In October, President Bush signed into law the USA Patriot Act, which allows law enforcement authorities unfettered access to search educational, library, medical, travel, credit, and immigration records of individuals. Opponents of the measure feel that this is just the beginning of a society in which personal liberties will become a thing of the past. More from ISP World.

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The End of the Net

MSNBC has an Interview with Lawrence Lessig who argues huge corporations are ruining the Internet.
In “The Future of Ideas” he warns that the Net is in danger of being controlled by special interests who will not only take our dollars but limit our speech and our ability to produce creative works.

\"What’s surprising to me is that there’s been very little reflection on the importance of maintaining balance, and the dangers of this very strong protection, where dinosaurs get to protect themselves against innovation.\"

Seems like a funny place to have an interview on this topic, eh? They mention AOL Time Warner, but not MSFT.

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Creating a Welcoming Atmosphere in the Library is Important

It\'s always nice to read about people in the library profession who go the extra distance to make a lasting impression, especially on kids. According to Noni St. Amand, school media specialist, \"Kids should be excited about reading\" During the course of her career, she has stressed the importance of promoting reading among children. One of the ways she\'s chosen to accomplish this is making sure she reads every book, that comes into her library, before it\'s shelved. More

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Images of the Librarian

I\'ve collected a few links on librarian stereotypes, and images to share with ya\'ll...

Stereotypes is part of IMAGE AND THE LIBRARIAN

THE LIBRARIAN STEREOTYPE AND THE MOVIES

The Image of the Librarian in Fiction

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Simon & Schuster helps kill publishing deal

Charlotte.com is running This AP Story on Simon & Schuster killing a deal between RosettaBooks, a start-up e-book publisher, and iBooks.
They sued Rosetta for copyright infringement for gaining electronic rights and offering versions of Kurt Vonnegut\'s \"Slaughterhouse-Five\" and seven other works the publisher had issued in paper form.

\"It hurts the authors and it hurts the reading public\'s opportunity to enjoy these books,\" Klebanoff said.

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Book Hunting Made Easier

Here\'s another article listing web sites for hard-to-find books. Some of the links are familiar, but there are a couple that I hadn\'t heard of before. More from The International Herald Tribune.

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Flap Over Phalluses Has Library In Limelight

Bob Cox sent along This One on Boulder\'s self-proclaimed \"dildo bandito\", took responsibility for removing 21 colorful ceramic penis sculptures that, prior to Saturday, hung in the library art gallery.

This Story also has a some pictures of the display, sponsored by the library and the Boulder County Safehouse, a non-profit group for battered women and children.

\"I would say that people should be more angry about the statistics that have been placed on the wall,\" a library patron told 7NEWS.\"

Alabama To Place Disclaimer On Books

This Findlaw Story, sent in By James Nimmo, says Alabama is maintaining its distinction as the only state where biology textbooks include a sticker warning students that evolution is a \"controversial theory\" they should question.

The statement says in part that evolution is \"a controversial theory. ... Instructional material associated with controversy should be approached with an open mind, studied carefully, and critically considered.\"

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U of T\'s porn test

Bob Cox sent along This Story from The Toronto Star on the largest collections of modern pornography in Canada now being cataloged at the University of Toronto, \"behind a door marked Do Not Enter — Alarmed Directly To The Toronto Police Service\".

Its acquisition makes U of T the first Canadian institution to own such materials, though the academic study of smut is well advanced in many places of higher learning in the United States.

\"Some of it is from Italy and goes back to the earliest days of filmmaking — there\'s one that I\'m guessing is from 1910 or 1915 because it\'s very jerky,\" says the professor. \"Oh, I guess I shouldn\'t use that word.\"

Caffeinating Library Gate Count

Hermit;-) adds some more on the empty library problem\"The Chronicle has an article lamenting student\'s decreasing attendance at libraries and voicing the familiar debate \"about what the rise of databases and the decline of reading rooms means for academics.\"
It mentions some of the things directors are doing to draw patrons back into the brick and mortar including using \"sofas-and-lattes\". The colloquy section asks the question \"Should college libraries try to attract more students by opening coffee bars and cafes?\"
Thursday, Nov. 15, 2 p.m. U.S. Eastern time is a \"live, online discussion\": \"Are College Libraries Too Empty?\" w/ the presidents of the ACRL & CLIR\"

The Deserted Library

Martin Raish writes \"As academic libraries spend more money on electronic resources, and less on \"traditional\" materials, our students are spending less time in the reading room and more in the computer labs. \"The shift leaves many librarians and scholars wondering and worrying about the future of what has traditionally been the social and intellectual heart of campus, as well as about whether students are learning differently now -- or learning at all,\" says Scott Carlson.

Chronicle of Higher Education, 16 November \"

Look Who\'s Reading

Lee Hadden writes: \" An article in the Wall Street Journal, Nov. 9, 2001, pages W1 and W4, is
about the amazing increase in book reading and buying among the under-25
crowd. After the flop of the Internet hype, book-reading is becoming a cool
thing for the younger set. Show your \"cool\" by supporting your \"inner
bookworm.\" Also, some books are used as an accessory to clothing- as a
fashion statement. Read more about it in the article by Pooja Bhatia, \"Look
Who\'s Reading Now: Under-25 Crowd is Purchasing Books in Record Numbers;
Faulkner as a Fashion Statement\".\"

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Cyber-sleuths demand new powers

James Nimmo passed along This Story from over at Findlaw on the seizure of a suspect\'s personal computer for the purpose of dissecting the hard drive for possible clues or motives.

FBI agents did just that in the days after the September 11 plane hijack attacks on America, when they confiscated two computers from a Delray Beach, Florida public library that were allegedly used by suspects.

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