Looting the Library

TechReview has This Amazing Story by Seth Shulman on what he calls \"Looting the Library\" by publishers.

He says publishers new greedy \"pay-per-use model\" for information content that will largely shut libraries out. No kind words for Pat Schroeder who he quotes as saying that publishers have to \"learn to push back\" against libraries.
He points out Peter Chernin, president and chief operating officer of Rupert Murdoch\'s News Corporation is calling for legislation that \"guarantees publishers\' control of not only the integrity of an original work, but of the extent and duration of users\' access to that work, the availability of data about the work and restrictions on forwarding the work to others\". You can see what that would do.

I agree with him when he says:\"Too much is at stake to let the publishing industry undo the careful copyright balance we have all come to rely upon.\"

Where is the outrage on this that I see everyday over filters??

Internet access in Rwanda

Margaret writes:

\"Can Rwanda use new technology to escape poverty? Ben Hewitt looks at the challenges ahead.\" This article gives an interesting perspective on Internet access in Rwanda, one of the poorest countries in the world. The Government\'s plans are detailed and useful statistics are supplied. Those who are concerned with siiues souuronding the \'digital divide\' will find it of particular interest. \"


Information access policy

Someone writes \"
A recent article from the Bulletin of the American Society
for Information Science and Technology, \"Information
policy: from the local to the global\" is worth a read. The
article reviews information access policies at various
geopolitical levels including international, regional,
national and local. The impact of copyright, the \'global
information economy\', the difficulties of administering
information policy, telecentres etc are all outlined. \"

Full Story


The Library Hot Sheets

Bob Cox sent along This Story from SFGate story on the most frequently stolen books list.

They say the American Library Association has taken a first step, e-mailing hundreds of libraries around the country and asking them to list their most-stolen items.

They say that copies of the Bible tend to walk out of public libraries and never return.


Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

I\'m way beind on everything here, so you probably already heard, but I feel the need to post this anyways.

Douglas Adams died at age 49 of a heart attack in Santa Barbara, CA. If there was a funnier book than The Hitchhiker\'s Guide I\'ve never read it.

Bob Cox sent along This Great Tribute as well.


Skim It and Weep

Lee Hadden writes:\"There is an excellent article on the problem of aliteracy, a scourge of
people who can read, but won\'t. Read more about it in the Washington Post.
\"The No-Book Report: Skim It and Weep : More and More Americans Who Can
Read Are Choosing Not To. Can We Afford to Write Them Off?\" A survey shows
Americans are reading printed versions of magazines, newspapers and books
less and less. \"Does this really surprise anyone?Truly sad\"

The Full Story has several interesting interviews and examples, it\'s worth the read.


Britain leads the way with European library project

writes \"Britain has moved a step closer
towards European
integration with the creation of a pan
continental virtual

The British Library is co-ordinating a
project which will allow
users to search for and access
digital and other collections
from the European participants.

A 30-month co-operative project will
provide the
groundwork on which to build the
pan-European service.

The project unites the eight national
libraries of Finland,
Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
Portugal, Slovenia,
Switzerland, and the UK.

The European Library (TEL) project
will be boosted with
funding of 1.2 million euros from the
Commission\'s Information Societies
Technology (IST)
research programme.

Detailed information on how the
project is progressing can
be found on the TEL website at

Internet cafes closed in Tehran

Reuters reports that police in Tehran shut down 400 Internet cafes in the city last week. One cafe owner is quoted as saying, "The rumors are that the police, the police intelligence unit, the (telecommunications agency) and other ministries are behind this. They have their own motives and reasons."

Read the story.

The porn crusaders

Salon has a long Story on the AFA and the fight it started against Yahoo!.

It\'s a good look at why Yahoo! caved in, and what the AFA is up to, so far they\'ve been rather unsuccessful, but they don\'t seem to be letting up. Funniest quote I\'ve heard in quite sometime.

\"I believe we can make a major difference. We can change the Internet.\" - Patrick Trueman legal counsel to the right-wing American Family Association.


130 Years Overdue and A Good Find

2 follow up stories from the always helpful Charles Davis.
Kilkenny in Ireland is offering a reward of $2,869 for the return of a
450-year-old record book borrowed 130 years ago, no questions asked. How\'s that for a fine? Keep a book 130 years and get paid to return it! A similar Story from ME, where police are searching for a 19-year-old Bangor man accused of stealing $27,000 worth of rare books and maps from the Bangor Public Library.

That stolen Library window has been recovered. Two \"sleuthing sisters\" found the stained-glass window stolen from the city library in January. The window, which had been on display since 1883 in the Thomas Crane Public Library, is worth a minimum of $100,000. Full Story

Independent Thinking and Middle East Librarians

Lee Hadden wrties: \"Stephen S. Rosenfeld had an
intriguing editorial in the Washington
Post concerning a letter sent by a librarian at the King
Fahd National
Library in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The writer of the letter,
one S\'ud Ibn
Muhammad Al-\'Aqili, wrote about the Palestinian
Authority\'s use of children
in the current intifada. The writer notes that the Prophet
Mohammed refused
to use children below 14 years of age in his
campaigns, but the PLO does
today. The editorial is about the independent thinking of
this individual.

The original letter can be read as \"Special Dispatch
#206\" in the Middle
East Media and Research Institute (MEMRI) site at: memri.org.
An interesting analysis, and an interesting comment
on library staff.\"

Price of stupidity: Read

I know it isn\'t excatly funny ha-ha, more like funny strange I guess...

The so called \"Jackass Four\", the high school teens who ran over their buddy while trying to recreate a TV stunt showing a man jumping over a moving car. The only shows the teen-agers are allowed to watch for the next six months are nightly news programs. And (here\'s the library connection), they must read 12 classics each and turn in a book report every two weeks.

Full Story


Laura Bush - Bitch or Victim?

Someone writes \"Fun story, despite the librarian stereotype...

\"As a former librarian, Laura is likely to be viewed by the public more as bespectacled victim than bitch (though this stereotype doesn\'t have much allure for Chatterbox, who in his time has encountered more than a few tyrannical librarians).\"

Full Story


Cataloging Missteps at the French National Library

From the International
Herald Tribune
: \"More than any other new
monument in Paris, the new
National Library
is a symbol of Francois
Mitterrand\'s desire to prove that he was the
\'thinker-president.\' Today, the building is less
associated with thinking than with calamity:
stupendously impractical architecture, despite the early
protests of people with experience in the field; a
user-unfriendly location and a clumsy attempt to mix a
scholarly library with a public one.\"

Bad News @ Questia Media

The Houston Chronicle is Reporting Questia laid off half of its work force Tuesday. They are also slowing down the pace at which books are added to the site because it was too hard to raise enough additional cash from investors to justify the pace at which it was adding books. Laid-off employees will receive eight weeks of pay and 60 days of benefits, not too bad I guess. They\'ve also had a fivefold increase in the number of paying subscribers in the past two weeks alone, that puts the number at around 5,000.


The Best of Times, The Worst of Times

Carrie passed along This NYTimes Story on Richmond, VA\'s decision to buy 23,000 new Apple iBook laptops. That\'ll be enough for every teacher and student in its middle and high schools.

Meanwhile in Montreal, the English Montreal School Board is considering reducing staffing hours at its elementary-school libraries. Yet more bad new from Canada, it never seems to stop. Full Story

Two Ohio Legislators Oppose Statewide Library Freeze

This one comes via ALA Online...
From the smallest rural public library to the academic library at the Ohio State University, libraries across the state of Ohio are scrambling to cut programs and services


FCC Considers Action to Stop E-Rate Fleecing of Consumers by Phone Companies

From The New York Times...
Under the E-Rate plan, the FCC currently requires telephone companies to contribute 6.9 percent of their interstate and international toll revenue to schools and libraries for Internet service and other technology expenses. Phone companies are allowed by law to recover a portion of these funds via what\'s called a Universal Service Fee. In light of certain telecompanies charging consumers several times the amount the carrier actually pays, the FCC is considering placing a cap on the amount telephone companies can charge consumers for the Universal Service Fee. [more...] from The New York Times.
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The Ol\' Bookmobile

Idahostatesman.com has a cool Story on a traveling library created in 1898 by the women of the Boise Colombian Club. The books were loaded into wooden crates and shipped by stagecoach or train to a library station. The article outlines the entire history of libraries in ID.

DMCA Misses the Mark

eCompany has a nice Story on the DMCA.

They say Media companies are quick to invoke the DMCA but it won\'t work. The DMCA is clearly losing the war being fought against it on two fronts.
1. The law is being invoked in cases where its ability to deter anybody\'s behavior is questionable
2. It\'s being used to preempt rights that are close to Americans\' hearts.

R.I.P. stupid law



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