The Great Hunt

How are the the strategies you use when you surf the Web similiar to the ones hunter-gatherers used to find food? [more].

This is the intriguing question posed by New Scientist in this article by Rachel Chalmers, \'Surf Like A Bushman\'.

What of Old Books?

Here\'s a short but sweet Story from Feedmag on our love / hate relationship with \"Old Books\". They call the LOC plan to digitize all it\'s books a \"fit of visionary enthusiasm\", and raise some interesting questions on the rush to digitize everything.

\"How much difference is there, really, between revering old books simply because they\'re old and ignoring them for the same reason?\"

Writers\' Rights on Net All Right

Wired has a Story on Featurewell.com, a site the creator says, could help redefine how people organize for their rights via the Web.

\"Writers\' freedom is often associated with causes such as Salman Rushdie, or cases of censorship in Africa and the developing world. But I argue that writers\' freedom is also the power to control the dissemination of your work.\"

The State of the GLF

LISNews is one of my hobbies, one of my other hobbies is
Investing. The Nasdaq Market has had a rough few months, and
Microsoft is a big part of that market. I\'ve been hearing
alot of talk about all the money being lost in the market,
which got me to thinking....


The Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation
has been a huge supporter of libraries around
the world.


Bill Gates set up the GLF, in part, with money made from
microsoft.


The GLF gave almost $35 Million to libraries last year. The
GLF paid almost $24 Million in Taxes last year (Still think
the rich are undertaxed?).


So now that Microsoft stock has gone from 119 to 47 (They
lost over 11% on Friday alone) what will become of the fund?
With libraries being a small part (1%) of the fund
distributions, will this money begin to shrink?


Can anyone shed some light on this for me? I\'m curious about
the status of the fund as I\'m a big fan of the fund and what
they do.

Opposing Copyright Extension

Dennis S. Karjala a Professor of Law @ Arizona State
University has put together a good resource for all those
interested in Copyright Law. Check Out His
Site
.

\"On October 7, 1998, both the House and the Senate
passed S. 505, the \"Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension
Act,\"extending the already-too-long term of copyright
protection by another 20 years. The legislation purports to
cover even works already in existence--a windfall gift to
special interests of what rightfully belongs to the public.
Our President, a self-proclaimed supporter of the little
guy, signed the bill on October 27, 1998. Like the Congress,
President Clinton has sold out the interests of the American
people to a few owners of valuable copyrights from the
1920\'s and 1930\'s. This web site shows how and why this
action was a tragic mistake. It also supplies news on a
judicial challenge to the constitutionality of the term
extension legislation, and contains materials opposing
longer copyright terms generally in the hope that, when this
issue arises again (around the year 2015 or so), those
seeking to defend the public interest will have some
ammunition.\"

The Grinch steals the classroom

Bob Cox writes:
Only a Liberryian.....


A Nice Story about a Liberryian who got all
dressed up as \"The Grinch\". \'Tis the season, after
all.

\"It takes an hour-and-a-half, but today, I got it down
to an hour and 10 minutes,\" he said. \"And then when I get
home, it\'s another hour to get it all off.\"

ALA Midwinter Conference

I have noticed that some LISNews readers consider ALA hopelessly lost and characterize it as wasting its time with issues like the Boy Scouts. I wonder how much these folks actually know about the American Library Association and what it does.


Readers may be interested in knowing about what ALA has planned for the upcoming Midwinter conference. The Midwinter conference is smaller than the annual conference and mostly focuses on business meetings of the various units and committees, but there are also some events that give a flavor for what ALA is doing. Read on for a recent news release describing what is going on at the ALA Midwinter conference next January. -- Read More

Information Experts in the Info Age

Information Experts in the Information Age is the name of a report from the Labor Department\'s \"Occupational Outlook
Quarterly\". They have many kind things to say about librarians and the work we do.

It\'s a PDF so you\'ll need Acrobat.

\"

Supreme Court sides with gay bookstore

Cabot writes \" CBC has a Story
on how
The Supreme Court has ruled in favour of a small Vancouver bookstore, ending its longstanding battle over Canada Customs\' power to seize material it considered obscene. \"


Since 1984, Canada Customs had confiscated 262 items destined for the Little Sister\'s Book and Art Emporium, because officers said the material was obscene.

Divide and rule out

Helga Cronje was kind enought to suggest This Story from The Gaurdian on the not-so vast reach of the internet. They say not even 2% of the world\'s population is linked to the net, most people on the planet have not even made a telephone call and there are more telephone lines in a big city like Tokyo than in the whole of sub-Saharan Africa. Looks like we have a long way to go.

The 1st eMail Ever

I found this one over on Slashdot.org.Pretext.com has an Interview and Story on the very first eMail ever sent.

\"Sometime in late 1971, a computer engineer named Ray Tomlinson sent the first e-mail message.\"

Freedom from choice

Bob Cox sent in This Story from Salon on all those \"best of\" books. You know the ones, \"Best Short Stories\", \"Best Long Stories\", \"Best Boring Stories\".....


\"Preselection is one of those organizing principles -- like Oedipal conflict or right-wing conspiracy -- that seem, the minute you hear them, to make disparate phenomena fall into an understandable pattern. Oprah\'s Book Club, for instance, has had more influence on American literature than Lionel Trilling and Ralph Waldo Emerson combined. It\'s so popular because Winfrey is saying, \"This is a good book. Go and read it.\" \"

eBook Quickies

A couple of eBook stories-


One from Techweb.com that says the future is looking eBook-less.
\"My feeling now is that unless they improve their platforms, nobody\'s going to be reading these damn books,\"

And This One from The Atlantic Unbound on the eBooks of the 90\'s that were produced on CD-ROM.

Dubbya on the \'Net

Wired has a Story on how the new administration here in the USA will be handling the internet. Check out the National Academy of Sciences report -
Tools and Strategies for Protecting Kids from Pornography and
Their Applicability to Other Inappropriate Internet Content
. Dubbya is likely to come down on internet free speech.

\"If you\'re a child, have a computer and know how to type, you can access anything you want on the Internet,\" Donnerstein said. \"The question is, what does this material do? What effects does it have?\"

Friday Updates

The Friday updates for this week include industrial action down under, tower collapse, Internet book lending, books about books, University cuts resources, library visions, outdaded books, and much, much, much more. Have a nice weekend. -- Read More

Dogpile Saves Lives

Search Engine Guide has this really strange article about a man who was having a heart attack, jumped on Dogpile did a boolean search, and saved his own life. Who said that Internet was bad for you.\"While doing homework for a class at Sinclair Community College, Mr. Russell found himself facing an adversary even more dangerous than Simon Bar Sinister; chest pains. As the pains quickly became severe and a terrible pressure grew in his chest, Mr. Russell became concerned. He decided to launch a search on Dogpile to help him track down a list of heart attack symptoms to see if they matched what he was feeling. Relying on Dogpile\'s ability to handle Boolean search commands, Mr. Russell typed \'symptoms and \"heart attack\"\' to help him pinpoint the life saving information he needed fast.\" -- Read More

Amazon fights union activity

Just in case you needed another reason not to use Amazon, here is an article in the New York Times about their efforts to prevent their workers from unionizing. (You may have to register to read the article, but that\'s free.) The article is a couple of weeks old, and newer stories are probably available, but I liked this one. If you want to get your books from a union shop, the place to go is Powell\'s, a great bookstore with a huge physical presence in Portland, OR. (Largest used book store west of the Mississippi, with lots of new books too.) You can get most things there. It\'s always my first stop when I\'m looking for a book.

The New Wireless Nation

Teri Ross Embrey writes \"It is becoming an increasingly wireless nation with recent reports predicting wireless growth to be significant for 14-25 years olds. So it is no suprise that for an article on wireless for IT Executives Information Week that the highlighted IT executive came from an Orland Park high school. Are libraries next? \"

UCITA: A Guide to Understanding and Action

December 13, 2000 (That\'s TODAY!)


1:00-4:00 p.m. EST

UCITA, the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act, is a proposed
state law that seeks to create a unified approach to the licensing of
software and information. Two states--Maryland and Virginia--have passed
UCITA, and it will be under consideration in many other states in the near
future. Several aspects of UCITA pose problems for higher education and
libraries.


If anyone else is going, and would like to report in the conference, please let us know!


I would love to hear what people think of this! -- Read More

I Saw You in the Paper

Here is an interesting little tidbit by Ananova about a public library in Tennessee publishing the names of patrons who have overdue materials in the local paper. Now, I have always wanted to see my name in the newspaper, but not this way. I hope they are not printing the names of the books that these delinquents have out\"The Lawrence County Public Library, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, published a notice containing more than 100 names of people who have failed to bring their books back.

And the strategy appears to be working, because some books which had been out of circulation for up to two years, have been returned.\" -- Read More

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