Book returned nearly 73 years late

Bill sent along This Story on a man that returned a slightly worn, hardback copy of \"Les Miserables,\" due back to the old Covington Library on Sept. 24, 1928. Library officials said they considered some kind of fine, but decided just to let the man go on the day he returned it in late May.

Good thing he didn\'t try this in Minnesota, he\'d be whisked off to jail!

An Animiated History of Books

The BBC has a cool new site called An Animated History of Books.

They start with cave paintings and go right on through today, and beyond. Comes complete with disembodied, floating, talking head of Shakespeare.


Post-Tasini: Pity the Librarians

Kendra Mayfield writes...
\"For publishers reeling from a recent Supreme Court loss, it\'s time to pay freelancers whose work has been republished in electronic databases without their permission. But rather than pay up or face billions in liabilities, publishers are deleting tens of thousands of freelance articles spanning decades. So who will bear the brunt of that extra work? The librarians, of course.\" [more...] from Wired.


Ryan Carter (not That Ryan) writes: \"USA Today article on the goings-on of YA books that deal with the same stuffs as do teens--violence and sexuality and stares, oh my! Mentions some good titles and their authors, touches on the importance of YA in public libraries, gets some blurbs from YA luminaries.
Also a ditty on the speedy disapparation of Tolkien books from library and bookstore shelves months before the movie opens.


Library Helps Restore Respectful Image of Ultimate Urban Horror

Ravaged with drugs and gang shootings, this community received national attention, including being demoralized by former President Clinton after a three-year-old girl was shot to death. Now, as part of an ongoing effort to improve the community and shed the image of what some have called \"the ultimate urban horror,\" they\'re building a library. [more...] from The L.A. Times.


Internet Users Champion the Presence of Disfavored Books in Public Libraries

Lou Marano writes...
\"In a study released this month, sociologists at the College Park, Md., campus found that Internet users appear to be more open, tolerant, trusting, optimistic and literate than non-users. This cannot be dismissed simply as
the profile of a younger and better-educated group, the researchers say, because they controlled for these and other demographic factors and found that the mindset held up regardless. Internet users were found to be significantly more likely to support certain nontraditional roles for women and to champion the presence of disfavored books in public libraries.\" [more...] from Virtual New York.


Copyright Victory Could be a Catch 22 for Freelance Writers

Wired reports today that the recent victory for freelance writers may not be so great afterall. According to the article, \"A major problem for writers is that many publishers, anticipating a loss in the Tasini case, have begun demanding that freelancers sign away all rights to their articles, including electronic rights, for no additional payment,\" said freelance writer Miriam Raftery in an e-mail. This sign-or-else mentality forces freelancers to choose between short-term survival and long-term stability.\" [more...]

Limited Copyright Exemption for Distance Learning Doesn\'t Include Libraries

Brian Krebs writes...
\"Legislation that would provide a limited copyright exemption for distance learning received a cozy reception from a House Judiciary subcommittee and its panelists today. The bill, S. 487, unanimously passed the Senate in a voice vote earlier this month, but only after a lengthy standoff between educational groups and the publishing industry...another bill would have extended the same exemptions to not-for-profit libraries, a possibility that was rejected during discussions on the bill in the Senate.\"
[more...] from NewsBytes.

Private Armey

According to House Majority Leader Dick Armey, the government is the biggest privacy offender and Congress should be more concerned with correcting its own privacy flaws before going after corporate abusers. [more...] from NewsBytes.

Happy Valentine\'s Day CIPA

The U.S. District Court in Philadelphia Tuesday ordered February 14, 2002 as the date for a civil suit to overturn the Children\'s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). [more...] from NewsBytes.


The problem of internet plagiarism

When a student had trouble aligning the margins on his research paper, he asked the school librarian for help. She had her suspicions and uncovered the real problem - his entire paper was lifted (margin formatting and all) directly from the internet. This story leads in to a detailed discussion of the increasingly common problem of internet plagiarism among school and college students and the measures that are being taken to deal with it.
[This story is from the New York Times so you need to register to have access to it - but it\'s free.]

Talk About High Turnover

People at the Lee County Library System in Florida seem to have trouble holding onto emplyees. Since 1999, they have lost ten administrators. Some blame the director. [more...] from News Press.


Placing Borders on the Internet

Michael Geist writes...
\"The development of cyberlaw has long been shaped by the belief that the Internet is borderless. Many observers argue that without borders, the Internet is impervious to the real-space laws that govern traditional geographic boundaries.\" [more...] from Globe Technology.


10 Reasons Why the Internet Is No Substitute for a Library

ALA Online has a Nifty List of the 10 Reasons Why the Internet Is No Substitute for a Library.

#1: Not Everything Is on the Internet.
#10: The Internet Is Ubiquitous but Books Are Portable.
Read the story for the full list.

That reminds me... I first learned the definition of Ubiquitous from Monday Night Football.


Librarians Just Don\'t Process Information the Same as Us Normal People

Emil Guillermo on the \"Librarian Frame of Mind...\"[more...] from Asian Week. They also have a link to \"APA Librarians Share Vision and Knowledge\" in the same publication. My brain is attempting to grasp something I learned in \"Studies in Logic\" while in does that go again...


FL Media Specialists deleted from Board Certification

Someone passed along This Link to a release that states, in part:\"the Department of Education will not be including any \"specialists\" in the Excellent Teaching Program (national certification & mentoring program). The Department has taken the position that the Statute that established the program was not intended to include teachers who did not have a full time class asigned to them.\"

Porn Again

By now everyone has heard of the Minneapolis 12, who filed a sexual harassment complaint with the EEOC over exposure to Internet porn on the job. According to constitution attorney Robert Peck, \"Because libraries exist to provide citizens with access to information, pornographic material \"that is within the protection of the First Amendment cannot be banned.\" [more...] from The Freedom Forum.


Finger: the new student webzine

Thanks to the ever-excellent Library Juice, I discovered that the students at SLIS, University of Michigan have started a new webzine, Finger. It has lots of interesting articles, including one about Questia vs. \"real\" libraries, interviews, oh lots of good stuff. I would have liked to see a little introductory piece on \"this is who we are and what this zine is about\" but maybe that\'s just me... Still, it made me proud of my library school roots!

What of eBooks?

Desley writes :\"Do you or any of the readers see the advantage of e-books for small Public Libraries? Can you see grandma curling up with the cat and an eBook reader on a cold winter\'s night?
If a grandchild wanted to give a loved grandparent an eBook as a gift where could they lovingly write the inscription for the grandparent to treasure for many years, or, for that matter, where could grandma write her inscription to the beloved grandchild to be treasured as well?
I see their value in the academic field or for the \'serious\' reader but I would be disappointed if they were to take over the world and deprive many of the pleasure of the feel of a \'real\' book. Maybe I am just a softie but the feel of a real book is like the caress of a loved one.
Hey, all you out there in LISNews Land!!! What do you think?\"

Have You Insured Your Library for Toxic Mold?

Ever hear of a library being forced to close because of toxic mold? Libraries aren\'t at the forefront of this article, but it mentions public facilities, including libraries being forced to close because of toxic mild infestations. Yuck. [more...] from The Houston Chronicle.
**Related article by Robin Wilson -
Mold and Fear Seep Into a Department.
(Thanks Ryan).



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