New Invention Could Drastically Alter Publishing Industry

For Business2, John McCloskey writes...

\"A machine that may be the publishing equivalent of a car that runs on water. Working from a digital file, it can print, bind, and trim a book of any size in a matter of minutes. Having finished with one title, it can proceed to another and another, as long as the machine is kept supplied with ink, toner, and paper-the same regular copy paper you might buy at Staples. \"When I first saw it, I knew it would be as important as Gutenberg,\" says Epstein, who emerged as something of a digital prophet last year with the publication of a work of his own, Book Business: Past Present and Future. \"The whole world changes,\" he says, \"because of that machine.\" [more...]


It Ain\'t Your Average Bookmobile, but These Books Are on a Roll Just the Same

Another great story about dedication to reading. A retired schoolteacher has decided to create a mobile library. Once a week, she loads her car with donated books and heads out in search of kids with a hunger for reading. [more...] from The Palatka (FL) Daily News.


... And the truth shall make shipping free

Why did a 49-cent booklet of Bible verses become a temporary bestseller on Because people took Amazon up on its offer of free shipping on purchases of two or more items. Word got around that The Book of Hope was one of the least expensive items to add to the shopping cart for item number two. Story in the Chicago Tribune.


Dead Authors Get No Respect

Robin Finn writes...

\"This country does a crummy job as guardian of great books by its dead authors. Or it used to. Edmund Wilson voiced that criticism 40 years ago, crankily and accurately.\" [more...] from the New York Times (don\'t have your free subscription? get it Here.


Another Library Arrest

Mary Jane passed along this Story on another guy being arrested for over due books, this time it was \"Green Eggs and Ham\". Maybe I need to add a new \"Library Arrests\" topic?

\"Overall it\'s kind of odd that you would arrest someone for not returning library books,\" Ann Arbor polic officer Mark Raab said, \"But I guess the library has to do what it has to do to get its books back.\"


Consumer Rights Change When Copyrighted Works Go Digital

For The Florida Times Union, Anick Jesdanun writes...

\"When you buy a book or a video cassette, you can lend it to a friend, sell it on eBay, even toss it in the trash. Or you can keep it to read or watch again and again. It\'s all legal under the \'\'first-sale doctrine\'\' of U.S. copyright law, the provision that allows libraries to exist. But your rights shrink when you\'re dealing with an electronic book or a movie downloaded from the Internet. [more...]
For a related story, \"Behind Digital Copyright, Click Here.

Conan the Librarian

So, I know that it\'s a bit early for a Friday funny but you just have to look at Conan the Librarian and his hilarious true tales of life in a library.
It was sooooo hard to pick a single example but here\'s a little sample for you:
\"I am looking for a book with this call number, but I can\'t find it,\" a student tells Conan. \"Which call number?\" Conan asks. The student shows him a slip of paper with \"327 p. 22 cm.\" written on it. Conan, ever the diplomat, pauses for a moment and then says to the student, \"I\'m sure we can find the book, but do you happen to recall what the title is?\"

Mayor asks library officials to resign

The mayor of Warren (Macomb County, MI) has asked the library director and the Library Commission chairman to resign over their handling of a \"slush fund\". This fund of $18,000 has been used by them to pay for trips to ALA but also more controversially, Kiwanis dues and political fund-raiser tickets. The mayor wants all spending to be approved by City Council and thinks, in times of big library budget deficits, it should go towards \"library-related items\" such as books. The two officials refuse to resign and defend their activities as representing and promoting the library within the community. Make up your own mind by reading this story from the Macomb Daily.

Strange behavior

This story from the San Jose Mercury News on how a court has issued a restraining order against a veteran San Jose police officer accused of making harrassing phone calls to the director of the County Law Library which recently dismissed him from a part-time security job.


Libraries will benefit from building sale

San Diego\'s First National Bank Building, the city\'s first high-rise office building built in 1909, will be sold to a private developer and all the proceeds will go to the branch libraries. The Stephen and Mary Birch Foundation, the philanthropic organization which last owned the building, donated it to the city with the proviso that any money made from its sale had to go to improving San Diego\'s libraries reports this little story from Sign On San Diego.

Preserving our 21st century digital heritage

This interesting feature from ABC News takes a detailed look at the issues surrounding the need to preserve the mass of information now being produced in digital form. It looks at efforts made by the Library of Congress and initiatives such as The Internet Archive to find ways of capturing this part of our cultural heritage and storing it for posterity. An excellent story with lots of useful links.

\"If somebody were to try to write a dissertation today about the Web in 1994, say, they would be hard-pressed to find the kind of archival primary materials that they\'d want.\"

It\'s library week in Botswana

Today marks the beginning of Library Week, hosted by the Botswana National Library Service reports this story from the Botswana Press Agency. The theme is \"Libraries - Gateway to an informed and educated nation\", to link in with Vision 2016, by which Botswana aims to be an informed and educated nation. It will be celebrated in public, special and education libraries and village reading-rooms.

Libraries forced to charge to make ends meet

This story from The Jerusalem Post tells how possibly 50% of Israel\'s public libraries have been reduced to charging patrons to borrow books, even though charging fees is illegal. This is the only way they can stay open because they are so short of money. Librarians and library supporters have been demonstrating in front of Jerusalem\'s main public library to try to get the extra funding needed.

Harry Potter artwork on sale

This story from Ananova reports that the original artwork from the first Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher\'s Stone, is to be auctioned at Sotheby\'s of London and is expected to fetch about 25,000 pounds sterling (just under $40,000). It is a 1977 watercolor by Thomas Taylor, though the editions I have seen of Harry Potter and the Sorceror\'s Stone (as it was called in the US) had a different cover, I think.
Sotheby\'s will also be auctioning a letter in which JRR Tolkien apparently accuses Walt Disney of being a business cheat.


New Internet Scout weblog

I have just found out that the excellent Internet Scout Report has a brand new weblog. It already has some interesting links including one to a digital exhibition by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas on \"Early Las Vegas\" and a browser emulator which lets you look at web pages on the early 1.0 and 2.0 versions of browsers.
If you have never heard of the Scout Report, it is \"a weekly publication offering a selection of new and newly discovered Internet resources of interest to researchers and educators\" and is well worth a look.


God and Bibliographic Control

An interesting article from the always valuable First Monday tracing the history of the bibliographic control of printed sermons and its role in the development of the art generally:

This essay will focus on the field of homiletics in America, especially within the mainline Protestant tradition, which can trace its beginnings to the New England settlers in the 17th century. The invention of the printing press two centuries before had increased the need for bibliographic control across Europe, and when printing arrived with the settlers in America, that same need followed. The first homiletical textbooks came from the printing of sermons, and young ministers \"turned to these ordination sermons to supplement their apprenticeships with working pastors.\" The first libraries in America were theological libraries, stemming from the work in England of an Anglican minister named Thomas Bray and his Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. By the early 19th century, homiletics was transformed into a formal academic discipline with the establishment of seminaries and divinity schools across America.

This issue also contains the article Positioning the Public Library in the Modern State: The Opportunity of the Children\'s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).


Harry Got It All Wrong

This could be the funniest thing I\'ve ever read. Harry Potter rides his broomstick with the brush part at the back in the upcoming movie.

A high priest of British White Witches said broomsticks should be ridden the other way round, and has wished for the film to do badly at the box office until the studio admits it got it wrong.

``Warner Bros claims the film is an accurate portrayal of things that happen in witchcraft, yet woodcuts from the 16th and 17th centuries show broomsticks being ridden with the brush part in the front,\'\' said Kevin Carlyon, who has his own coven in Sussex, southern England.\"


What’s Important?

AbcNews is running an Interesting Story on issues facing the preservation sector.
They managed to avoid Baker in this one somehow.

\"In 20 years, we will try to find first editions of their works, and we will look for their papers on the market,\" she says. \"If they have stuff on disk, and we collect their disks, that means we have to have technology to be able to read their disks. … We\'re still buying Mark Twain letters. We haven\'t really grappled with somebody from the [19]90s yet.\"

David & Goliath in Japan

Asahi has a Story on the record number of small book shops closing in Japan.

They say about1,300 bookstores closed last year and 6,400 have disappeared since 1995. Most big stores are not in much better shape, this is a result of a bubble in the book retailing business.

Bookstores also face tough competition from discount stores selling remaindered or almost-new books, from online bookstores, public libraries and ``manga cafes,\'\' where customers can browse among current manga comic.

I think we have now run this same story from the US, Ireland, England, and now Japan.


Search Engine Best Of

Google has started up a Best Of Page. It\'s weak compared with Yahoo, and Lycos, but it\'s a start.
I would assume there are other pages out there, like these, I don\'t know about, can anyone make any suggestions?
It\'s always interesting to see what people think is worth reading.



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