A Librarian\'s Alphabet

A Librarian\'s Alphabet is a fun little list of what letters go with what in the LIS world, by Denise Plourde.


\"
A is for Access, a large part of our creed.
Z is for Libraries. (In LC classification!)
\"

It goes from A to Z, though L is for Library instead of LISNews.

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Libraries of the Future

\"Even though forecasting change is a highly questionable enterprise, this chapter is devoted to imaginations regarding possible futures of a smokestack information system (McKenzie, 1993) we once called \"libraries.\" What are we going to find when we visit in 2005? Will we still have library media specialists working in schools? Will they still work in spaces which students visit once each week in order to provide prep time for classroom teachers? Will there be even more feet of shelving to hold books? Will there still be books?\"


Libraries of the Future is a neat look forward from November, 1993, by Jamie McKenzie.

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The Slippery Slope of Filtering

The October 6th. 1997 First Monday ran
Filtering the Internet in American Public Libraries: Sliding Down the Slippery Slope, by Jeannette Allis Bastian.
The use of filters to block those Internet sites that some public libraries and/or communities deem undesirable has caused an uproar within the profession as various viewpoints vie for ascendancy. The author examines positions taken by the American Library Association and others and reviews the choices and consequences of various filtering products. She concludes that libraries must retain responsibility for their offerings but also protect First Amendment rights

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Merchandising @ Your Library

jen writes \"In Conversation with: Schlafly Library Regional Branch Manager Judy Bruce

This rebuilt library is supposed to be more like a bookstore - coffee shop, faced out books, lots of bestsellers, etc.

Judy Bruce says:\"We\'re doing a thing that we call \'merchandising\'. The appearance of the branch is much like you would see in Barnes and Noble or Borders. We have a lot of face-out displays. You\'ll notice all around the library there is a big window or a face out display; we don\'t have any just plain wall space. Even on the shelving and the ends of the bookcases were trying to display books, so people can see the covers, it\'s more attractive. If people pick up [a book], they take it. We really put a focus on displays. We try to make it all more visually appealing. There\'s also a focus on providing popular best sellers.\"

Good idea, or evil corporate influences sneaking into our libraries?

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Information Literacy Roundtable Webcast Today

Learning Week will Webcast a roundtable discussion on information literacy today at 1:00 PM U.S. EST. Participants will be:

Karen Schneider, Coordinator of the Librarians\' Index to the Internet, and American Libraries Columnist

Ilene Rockman, Manager of the Information Competence Initiative for the Office of the Chancellor, The California State University

Nancy Hammeke, Executive Director, Abington Township Public Libraries, PA

Janice McNally, Lead Consultant for Colorado State Library sponsored LSTA Grant Project to revise the
Colorado Information Power Handbook

This \'cast will be available after the fact (along with previous ones) via the Learning Week archive.

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Image of Female librarians

Bill Drew writes \"The image of the typical female librarian is changing. Baccardi has an ad in the Jan 31 issue of Rolling Stone opposite page 23. It says \"Librarian by Day - Baccardi by Night.\" It is good for a chuckle. \"


See also, Digital Image: the stereotype of the
female librarian and images of and by
librarians on the Internet, over at Warrior Librarian Weekly. This dissertation aims to look at the stereotype of the female librarian and images of librarians on the Internet.

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A surprising lesson in digital content

Someone writes \"ZDNET Story on a company named NewsStand that delivers a digital version of the NYTimes and other, advertisements, classified ads, stock market listings and TV programs and all.
They say this could even have some far-reaching second-level impact on the content market and It shows us that we still have a lot to learn from printed publications, and that \"pure\" information isn\'t everything.

\"

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Collection Management Initiative

Laura Fosbender writes \"From October 2001 through September 2002, about 300 print journals, for which electronic access and publisher data are available, have been temporarily removed from the shelves of the nine campuses of the UC system.

During the course of the experiment, faculty and students will rely on the digital versions of these titles to meet their information needs.

The loss of NY\'s bookstores

Fiona writes \"Village Voice has an interesting article
on the death of independent bookstores in New York City at -
Rising rent seems to be the main reason for the closure of several stores.


\"Whatever the factors—rent spikes, chain domination, reading-allergic citizenry, publishers\' high price tags—it was hard for a bookstore lover not to notice all the closings in 2001. \"
\"

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The big get bigger: Reed expected to merge with Wolters

Geoff Harder writes \"According to the Sunday January 6, 2002
edition of The Observer: \"Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch publisher, and Amsterdam-based rival Wolters Kluwer are expected to merge by the end of the year, according to investment bankers.\" A lot of power in the hands of a very few... The full story can be found Here.\"

Kids and Civil Liberties

Val writes \"The Village Voice\'s Nat Hentoff waxes nostalgic off about Joe McCarthy and his John Ashcroft, and that pesky ol\' Bill of Rights.
Full Story \"


See also, On the Public\'s Right to Know , The day Ashcroft censored Freedom of Information.

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The top ten reasons why the Internet still will not replace the public library

The top ten reasons why the Internet still will not replace the public library by Andy Barnett says don’t plan on closing your doors anytime soon. He gives ten reasons why the public library is here to stay.

The business of the Internet is entertainment, Increasingly, quality content will cost, and Text on paper has some widely ignored advantages are just a few.

UK 1901 Census Goes Offline

This story from BBC News is reporting that the Public Record Office has had to take the England and Wales 1901 Census offline for a week while they try to improve the computer systems in order to cope with the huge demand.
As this earlier story reported, it went live last week and promptly got an average of about 30 million hits per day while they had only designed the site for a \"generous estimate\" of 1 million per day. It\'ll be back in a week, hopefully sleeker and ready to face its users but until then, it\'s probably more helpful not to provide a link to it here!

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I Hate Librarians

Whilest tolling through the comments I ran across librarianarchy\'s friends and enemies list, and it occured to me not everyone likes librarians.
Some people hate librarians, calling us bitter,
snappy, completely bitchy
, or, mean & evil ,and we even smell of old books .
Some people hate us so much they\'ve written Poems about how much we suck.

Others Don\'t Like the ALA, but no one seems to Hate It.
Of course, there are pleanty of reasons to Hate Books.
Not to worry, we are also Loved, and so are Books [note: interesting search result].
[also note: I don\'t hate librarians, it\'s just a catchy title]

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The geeks who saved Usenet

Bob Cox sent along This Salon.com Story on Google\'s restoration of digital history and how some packrat mentality [you may think of that as librarianship] and a mountain of decaying mag tapes brought back some old messages.

Oreillynet has another story, as seen on slashdot.

There seems to be no shortage of Other USENT History info out there as well.

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Book Forager

Bob Cox pointed out Book Forager, they say \"Book Forager offers an easy way to find the kind of read you are looking for\".

It\'s a kind of wizard [not the D&D kind, but the install kind], that leeds you through choices, and finds a book based on what you entered.

You can choose things like, happy, sad, short, long, and so on.

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Legislature holds fate of library in its hands

Brynn passed along The Latest Word on the WA State library.

Gov. Gary Locke wants to shut it down in October as part of his plan to balance the state budget, which faces a $1.25 billion shortfall. And if the Legislature goes along with that proposal, as many as 134 full-time or part-time librarians could lose their jobs in a move that would save $5.5 million.

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Library finds friends in volunteers

Here\'s A Nice Little Story on all the nice things \"Friends\" do for libraries.

\"Libraries are so important to a community,\" Brown said. \"They give people a chance to read so many more books than they\'d be able to buy.\"

Another Love Letter to Public Libraries

From the Washington Post:

Kids adore libraries. Where else can you find endless shelves filled with stories about curious monkeys, giant peaches, beanstalks and hungry caterpillars? The plastic library card and the responsibility of returning books on time is a rite of passage, one of many marking our entrance into the adult world.

Most adults, on the other hand, tend to favor the crisp, sanitized environs of chain book retailers, where one can flip through the latest John Grisham bestseller or fresh copies of Oprah-worthy selections while nursing coffee and biscotti.

I used to be among those latte-drinking, magazine-flipping masses, snubbing my modest neighborhood library until just a few months ago. Visions of musty stacks, an archaic Dewey Decimal System and intimidating librarians kept me from going, even though it\'s just half a block from my apartment . . .

More.

The Triumph Of Librarians

Marylaine passed along word that Rory got a mention in a Salon Story on Michael Moore\'s new book. Ann Sparanese, a librarian at Englewood Library in New Jersey gets the credit for starting the ball rolling.


\"When Michael Moore\'s publisher insisted he rewrite his new book to be less critical of President Bush, it took an outraged librarian to get it back in the stores.\"

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