People Still Like to Read

Lois Fundis writes \" The New York
Times
has a Story that one of the nation\'s oldest
magazines (founded 1857), under a new management,
is being redesigned but still focused on \"exploration of
big ideas, big subjects, the American experiment. I do
not mean to get highbrow about it, but that is what The
Atlantic is about.\" It also mentions their longstanding
rivalry with Harper\'s, also founded in the 1850s: \"the
difference between New York and Boston\".

\"

Reasons to be thankful for librarians

Lois Fundis writes \"Craig Wilson, in his Wednesday (Jan. 17) column in the Life section of USA Today, praises librarians for our devotion to and skill at \"the hunt\" -- tracking down odd bits of information -- from a public-library reference librarian who helped him when he was a young reporter, to the modern librarians at USA Today. \"The bells and whistles at their disposal were far more advanced than anything Mrs. Susman had back in Saratoga Springs, but the game was the same. They were always ready to dig.\"
\"

Public Library Quickies

After hunting for library oriented stories for over a year I think I\'ve gotten a good idea of the typical library story. Most Public Library stories are something like, Library launches improved Web page, or Library board to discuss plan to allow drinks upstairs, then there is the Funds short for library, and the most popular We Need or are Building a New Library.

Most of the stories I find are rather boring, or too \"local\" to be of much interest to many people.
Occaisionally I\'ll run across a good one like A Profile of a Library Director, or
This isn\'t your parents\' library
and finally the lovely Renaissance of Libraries. There\'s good news out there, it just takes awhile to find most of the time.

Stories From The Great Divide

One-third of the overall U.S. population uses the Internet at home, compared to just 16% of Latinos and 19% of African Americans, according to recent U.S. Department of Commerce statistics. Cyberstate.org has grand plans to help close the digital divide.


While the LA Times says Minorities Use the Web Differently. African Americans were more likely than other groups to focus on career advancement and professional development, education, family and relationships and entertainment. Latinos were more likely to use the Internet as a major source of news content, particularly for international news.


Meanwhile in the UK the divide seems to be at Work as well, A survey of 200 large firms across Britain, conducted by KPMG\'s legal arm, KLegal, found that 30% did not provide staff below middle management level with internet access. That figure increased to 40% when specialist information technology firms were stripped out of the sample.
In a somewhat related story, BT is turning pay phones into temprarially free internet kiosks, Story Here.

View From ALA Midwinter

I have my exciting ALA Midwinter Photos posted.


Some of the highlights include:

Stupid Panda Tricks

The First OCLC Terminal [I was suprised to find at the Smithsonian].

The First Apple Computer.

A view of the trade show floor.

And Stupid Vendor Tricks, yes that is a real person.

Study finds errors rife in U.S. science textbooks

CNN is one place with The Story on how bad science textbooks seem to be. Twelve of the most popular science textbooks used at middle schools across the United States are riddled with 500 pages worth of errors. The part that scared me was They tried to contact textbook authors with questions but in many cases the people listed said they didn\'t write the book, some didn\'t even know their names were listed!

\"The books have a very large number of errors, many irrelevant photographs, complicated illustrations, experiments that could not possibly work, and drawings that represented impossible situations,\"

The Old-Fangled Search Engine

Lois Fundis writes \"The Washington Post, covering ALA Midwinter, interviews ALA President Nancy Kranich and explains that not only do libraries still count, \"Libraries may get hot\" -- not only because the incoming First Lady is a former librarian, but because \"Libraries are like the ultimate 3-D web sites.\" \"


From the story:
\"Good question. Whom do we ask? AltaVista? Google? Ask Jeeves.com? Nahhh. Let\'s ask a librarian.\"


This is the kind of story I just love to read! -- Read More

ALA Award Winners

Richard Peck, author of \"A Year Down Yonder,\" and David Small, illustrator of \"So You Want To Be President?\" are the 2001 winners of the John Newbery and Randolph Caldecott Medals, the most prestigious awards in children\'s literature. -- Read More

Library Movie Review

Irene Wood sent this along originallyAnn Ferrari has written a nice movie review and was kind enough to share it with us:

I few weeks ago I watched a great British movie called \"Shooting the Past\"
which was a Mobil Masterpiece Theater production in 1999. It\'s the best
and most suspenseful portrayal of a library that I\'ve ever seen in a movie, so
I thought I\'d write up a review. (By the way, it\'s available for sale from
Amazon.com, and I managed to borrow it through my local library).


Shooting the Past is the story of a British photographic library housed on
an old estate...... -- Read More

The Wireless Library

Sharon Giles Writes:

\"From the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library (from their alert service LibLines)
With the opening of Sophie\'s Agora and Internet Café the HAM-TMC Library will have wireless capabilities. This means that our patrons with laptops and other portable computers may gain access to the internet without being constricted to the computer labs.


There will be 6 access points in the library\'s café, each capable of supporting 250 users anywhere in the library. However, to ensure that signals reach every level of the library, access points will be installed on each floor, allowing laptop users internet access from the stacks, study carrells and study rooms.

Whether you use a laptop or a handheld device all that is needed to access the wireless ports is a wireless PC card adapter.



Click here for more information on wireless technology.

\"

Seth Finkelstein\'s Free Speech Pages - Censorware

Don Saklad writes \"Seth Finkelstein\'s Free Speech Pages - Censorware Essays are available online at
sethf.com/freespeech/censorware/essays
\"
In case you don\'t know who he is, Seth says:

\"I was one of the very first people arguing against censorware and pointing out the deeps flaws, as early as 1995. Now, that\'s free-speech gospel. But it was a lonely stance back then.

I co-Founded Censorware Project, and spent a lot of time volunteering my skills as chief programmer. Unfortunately, increasing legal risk and lack of desperately needed defense/support for me ended my participation.

With all that programming, I still managed to write some early essays criticizing censorware.

Getch\'er Vatican Library reproductions here!

Brian writes \"business2.com

has a Story on the Vatican Library (established in 1451), \"Long closed to those outside the church, the world\'s oldest library has staked out a storefront on the Web.\"
\"

Librarians wanted to switch jobs with a Las Vegas

Brock writes \"
Here´s something funny if you need a story for your next edition...Inside Edition is looking for a librarian between 21 and 35 to switch lives
with a Las Vegas showgirl for their \"Switch\" segment. Don\'t ask me why.


The site is flash-only so you to click the link from the homepage \"

How many librarians does it take......?

Whoa!! Two humor pieces in a row! A friend (thanks Denise) sent me this story from Yahoo a few days ago, but I forgot to post it here. It seems that a library in the UK had to close for a bit while they changed some 300 lightbulbs. I guess we now know the answer to that long asked question.\"The answer is five days and a team of electricians if the bulbs that need changing happen to be in Peckham Library.

The question which has amused generations of schoolchildren and adults alike has finally been answered by Southwark council. It has closed the £4.5 million library - which opened last May - while its 300 light bulbs are replaced by a team of four workers.\" -- Read More

Shhhh...don\'t you know this is a bar

I put this one from the National Post in the humor category, because it put a smile on my face. There is a bar in Toronto called the Munster Hall Pub where talking is not allowed for two hours on Sundays because they watch a British Soap Opera. It\'s pretty ironic that libraries are getting more and more loud and pubs/bars are getting quiet.\"No one does talk, or even whispers, during the show. It\'s like being in a library. \'\'It is strange,\'\' says Mr. Hamilton. \'\'But in my family -- there\'s eight of us -- you just know not to call during Coronation Street.\" -- Read More

NPR Audio on Philadelphia Schools

From member station WHYY, Martin Wells reports Philadelphia schools are making an effort to get rid of library books that are tattered, inappropriate, or just plain wrong. Some decades old books talk about how man may one day land on the moon, another wrongly says that South African leader Nelson Mandela was executed.


You can listen to the Real Audio report on The NPR Site.

Congressional Web Learning Report

The NY Times has a Story on The Commission on Web-based Education. They had
identified seven key points in its report on harnessing the learning power of the Internet.

\"If you throw a rock in Washington, D.C., you\'re bound to hit someone in favor of wide expansion of broadband -- there are lots of people pulling for it,\"

Google of Archives Stories

Library of Congress has 5 million U.S. history items online. The 5 million images belong to a project called \"American Memory,\" available at loc.gov.


Meanwhile, USC has nearly $2 million worth of Ernest Hemingway\'s letters. Now the USC where students and researchers can study how authors develop their ideas and their works. \"I\'m still giddy about it,\" professor Matthew Bruccoli said. Denver Post Story


Also, More than 150 copies of the complete legal papers of Abraham Lincoln will soon be going out to law schools across the country, thanks to a grant received recently by The Lincoln Legal Papers research project. Full Story.

Thanks to Bob Cox for most of these.

Laura Bush is no Jackie O

Bob Cox sent this one in.

I can\'t remember for sure if This Story started it, but there has been a very spirited discussion on LM_NET about Laura Bush, and her \"Librarian Like\" appearance.

\"Mrs. Bush\'s look is pretty, practical and proper, but it lacks the flair to spark any major fashion following - except perhaps, in those parts of the South where fashion seems stuck in the 1980s,\" one reporter wrote in an article for the Orlando Sentinel.

E-Book Forecast: Cloudy

This Story from Wired takes more than a little of the wind out of the eBook hype. They say some are forecasting the death of e-books, already. A recent study says textbooks and print-on-demand publishing will do well. With sites like Baen Free Library giving them away, I wonder how strong sales will be.

\"Forecasts may vary, but everything points to a very attractive and growing market that\'s a mix of print and electronic formats existing with each other,\" Sadler said. \"Over time, e-books will be a great value proposition.\"

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