Dead Books

Daniel Traister has written an interesting Look At Books, specifically, preservation and collection. He says his effort is to think about a set of interrelated questions:
what libraries collect;
what libraries don\'t collect;
why libraries make the decisions about what to collect they make;
and why libraries are (and, obviously, whether they should be) so devoted to impossible ideals of universal preservation (the goal of universal acquisition having been effectively, although not intellectually, abandoned long ago).

\"I think we need realistically to come to grips with limits. I think we need to come realistically to grips with mortality. I think we may even need to admit that, counterintuitive as it may seem to \"us,\" there are not only some books that will die, but also some that should. And then start choosing.\"

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Creating a Personal Online Reference Desk

LLRX writes \"The
December 3rd issue of LLRX.com has an article
on creating a Web page to collect and access research
links. Just follow Diana Botluk\'s efficient step-by-step
guide, and what once may have seemed an
intimidating process will become a straight-forward
and easily accomplished task.
See ll
rx.com/features/onlinerefdesk.htm
for the article.
\"

The Web Never Forgets

The LATimes
has an Interesting Story on US
government agencies that tried to remove sensitive
information, only to discover that copies have
proliferated and they\'re virtually impossible to eradicate.

\"The Internet is not like a faucet you can turn off
and on. It\'s like a leaky faucet that keeps dripping long
after it\'s turned off,\" said Gary Bass, executive director of
OMB Watch

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In Troubled Times, Kids Go for the Feary Tales

From The Washington Post.

\"For adults who think the national anxiety about terrorism and war have driven children to seek comfort in cheery stories with upbeat endings, a popular eight-volume series of stories with titles like \"The Vile Village\" and the \"Miserable Mill\" may come as a shock.\" More

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Diversity Integrated Into Kids\' Books

From The Chicago Tribune...

\"More and more children\'s books appear to be incorporating different ethnic races into their stories. From one page to the next, black kids interact with Hispanics, hold hands with white kids or play together with Asians. \"It is self-evident that the need is there because the country is getting more diverse,\" explained Philip Lee, co-founder and publisher of Lee & Low Books, an independent children\'s book publisher in New York specializing in multicultural themes. Lee said schools and libraries make up more than half his clientele. \"We get a lot of requests because bookstores are not necessarily located in communities of color, but obviously schools and libraries are everywhere.\" More

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OCLC Creates Digital Division

From Business First-Columbus...

\"The Online Computer Library Center has created a new division to help its member libraries catalog and preserve their digital resources. The division will be responsible for helping libraries create, access and preserve existing digital collections; collaborate to build new digital collections; and learn about digitization and preservation issues. It will house the OCLC\'s Digital Archive, the Digital and Preservation Co-op and the Digital and Preservation Resources Centers.\" From More

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Library Amnesty Purchased for a Dollar

From The Monroe Evening News.

\"Children younger than 12 with overdue books at the Monroe (MI)County Library System can now buy amnesty for $1.
The library system, through its circulation task force, has initiated the Kids Care Program, which allows anyone younger than 12 to return overdue books and materials for a $1 donation to America\'s Fund for Afghan Children.\" More

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Ex-Soviet Films and Photos on the Web

Carol Reed writes \"Newsday.com has an article on a Texas business man who is arranging to have the films and photos from several ex-Soviet Archives cataloged and put up on the Web.It looks like a very interesting project. It\'s still a work in progress, but the archives in Russia have a nearly complete collection of newsreels from 1919-1985, and the earliest film is of the coronation of Czar Nicholas II in 1896. Here\'s a link to the archives web page -- the link at the end of the Newsday.com story is somewhat messed up.\"

ACLU Assails Internet Anti-Smut Law

A lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union told the Supreme Court yesterday that the main federal law aimed at keeping children from viewing pornography on the Internet would cripple free speech for adults in cyberspace.

Full Story from washingtonpost.com

\"Congress was saying that those who pollute the stream from which we all drink have some responsibility to reduce the harm\"-Solicitor General Theodore B. Olson

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Far from being old hat, libraries have never looked more interesting

Charles Davis writes \"The Sunday Times has the following article on new libraries\".


There is a building boom world wide, Public libraries routinely costing between £90m and £120m are being planned and built in Amsterdam, Marseille, Milan and Turin. Top architects are involved in each project. In America, the technology-rich West Coast states are building libraries like crazy.

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BusinessWeek Looks at Questia

steven bell writes \"In the December 10 issue of BusinessWeek the Technology columnist, Stephen Wildstrom, tries out Questia and likes it, but has some doubts about its current feasibility (obviously written before last week\'s news about more layoffs at Questia).He writes, \"it\'s easy to see how online libraries could take a lot of the tedium out of research. I don\'t think they will ever replace the pleasures of browsing the stack of a serious research collections. As a lover of old-fashioned libraries, I certainly hope not.\" Who is he calling \"old-fashioned\"? Do you think he\'s visited his local academic library recently? I think not. The online version of this article is available only to subscribers. \"

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Library to Museum: Leave Our Joyce Alone

Trouble is brewing at two august British institutions:

For centuries they were two halves of one venerated cultural institution. Now, three years after they went their separate ways, a rift has emerged between the British Museum and the British Library over the growing literary flavour of the former\'s exhibitions.

The museum is planning a three-month display next spring of illustrations inspired by James Joyce\'s Ulysses, and curators at the library, in London, are said to be livid at what they regard as the latest example of a creeping infiltration of their academic territory.

A source at the library told The Independent on Sunday: \"Bosses are fuming, and the curators do not understand what the British Museum is playing at. We want it to get its tanks off our lawn.\"

More from the Independent.

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Black Author Hurls That Word as a Challenge

stuart yeates writes \"

A black Harvard scholar,Randall Kennedy has published a book on the word nigger. \"I think it is pretty fun,\" Mr. McDonald said, imagining customers asking a bookstore clerk, \"Can I have one `Nigger\' please? Where are your `Niggers\'?\" He added, \"I am not afraid of the word `nigger.\' \" The story is here\"


He said he had come up with the idea for the book, which grew out of a series of lectures, after idly typing the word \"nigger\" into a database of court cases.

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What\'s selling in sport books

The Guardian has a Nifty List of the top 10 most popular sport books in the UK this week.

1 The European Football Yearbook 2001/02 ed Mike Hammond
2 Boys of \'86 - The Untold Story of West Ham United\'s Greatest-Ever Season by Tony McDonald & Danny Francis

I wonder if a soccer book has ever been a best seller over here?

See Also the entire list of top 10\'s in the UK.

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Harry Potter furor spawns closer look at books

I just can\'t get enough of the Christians Vs. Harry Potter stories.

With the intense interest in the movie \'\'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer\'s Stone,\'\' certain books in Lubbock TX Independent School District elementary libraries are under close inspection.
Full Story

\'\'I have not received any calls from parents requesting us to look at books in our library,\'\' Graves said. \'\'We just want to be prepared and aware of what books we have in our library.\'\'

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California sells birth data to Web site

The birth records of more than 24 million Californians have been sold by the state and posted on the Internet, offering easy access to critical information needed to create fake identities.
Full Story is at siliconvalley.com

Copyright Law Foes Lose Big

Wired has a good Wrap Up on some bad luck the good guys had in US courts last week.

Wednesday a pair of federal courts siding with the music and record industry, the Electronic Frontier Foundation lost two of its most important intellectual property cases so far.

Many had pinned their hopes on these lawsuits as a way to eviscerate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Conspiracy Theories A Go-Go

I think it was Mefi that pointed me to makethemaccountable.com and This Huge Collection of alternative theories on the 9-11 tragedies. They have a collection of links and questions you\'re not likely to find anywhere else.


Did the U.S. know that the attacks were going to happen?

What are the Bush family\'s business connections in the Middle East?

Who is investigating this travesty?

Who benefits from this war?

And so on...

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The Secret Land Of Librarians

0(Zero)format has a Really Cool Story on us \"Online Librarians\".

\"People know about genealogy groups, programming and design communities, diary circles, web rings, and sci-fi/fantasy cinema cults. But who knew about the roiling, secret activities of librarians?

Let\'s talk about librarians. What makes an online group of librarians such a fascinating find?\"

Big ups to Sylvar for pointing the way.

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ELectronic Society for Social Scientists

ELSSS, the ELectronic Society for Social Scientists is a new, non-profit-making society, whose mission is to improve scientific communication in the social sciences, especially by the provision of electronic publications of high quality, wide diffusion and low cost for the direct benefit of the academic community (and indirectly for the taxpayer and the general public).
ELSSS is an initiative aimed at:

1. Increasing competition in the academic journal publishing marketplace;
2.Introducing a fairer and more efficient way of producing, distributing, and consuming academic journals
whereby the large surpluses currently being earned by some commercial publishers are redistributed to the individuals who make journals, namely, authors, referees, and editors - with substantial savings for libraries and the academic and student community.


Take part in the survey.
see Also.

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