Two Ohio Legislators Oppose Statewide Library Freeze

This one comes via ALA Online...
From the smallest rural public library to the academic library at the Ohio State University, libraries across the state of Ohio are scrambling to cut programs and services

FCC Considers Action to Stop E-Rate Fleecing of Consumers by Phone Companies

From The New York Times...
Under the E-Rate plan, the FCC currently requires telephone companies to contribute 6.9 percent of their interstate and international toll revenue to schools and libraries for Internet service and other technology expenses. Phone companies are allowed by law to recover a portion of these funds via what\'s called a Universal Service Fee. In light of certain telecompanies charging consumers several times the amount the carrier actually pays, the FCC is considering placing a cap on the amount telephone companies can charge consumers for the Universal Service Fee. [more...] from The New York Times.
**This is a free subscription service. To subscribe, Click Here.

The Ol\' Bookmobile

Idahostatesman.com has a cool Story on a traveling library created in 1898 by the women of the Boise Colombian Club. The books were loaded into wooden crates and shipped by stagecoach or train to a library station. The article outlines the entire history of libraries in ID.

DMCA Misses the Mark

eCompany has a nice Story on the DMCA.

They say Media companies are quick to invoke the DMCA but it won\'t work. The DMCA is clearly losing the war being fought against it on two fronts.
1. The law is being invoked in cases where its ability to deter anybody\'s behavior is questionable
2. It\'s being used to preempt rights that are close to Americans\' hearts.

R.I.P. stupid law

home-ed-press.com Now Links to Porn Site!

Amy Hollingsworth writes \"Since 20% of our subscribers are libraries, I thought you might want to post this. It\'s a terrible situation: people trying to access information on homeschooling will instead be sent to a porn site. It\'s one of those sites that doesn\'t let you escape; it keeps opening multiple windows until the browser or computer crashes.

We appreciate any help you can offer in getting the word out!


Sites that originally linked to Home Education Magazine through home-ed-press.com should now use: www.home-ed-magazine.com.

Full Relase Follows -- Read More

Filtering Round Up

More than a few Filtering Stories in my Bookmarks this morning.

Colorado\'s Bill keeping kids from Net porn looks like it will die in the CO State Senate.

CNN Story on how representatives of nearly a dozen anti-pornography organizations will meet with U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft next week to try and convince the government to start enforcing obscenity laws.

Yahoo! is now under fire from \'betrayed\' porn fans, after it began to crack down on all things naked on the site. See Also.

Will The Religious Right
Make The Tech Slump Even Worse?
is an interesting look at what could happen if all those groups get their way.

AOL\'s New Filter on the Block

Kuroshin.org on the family friendly library.

Literary life and death

Bob Cox sent along This Story that takes a very different look at \"Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper\" by Nicholson Baker.
I know, you\'re probably about sick of hearing about this book, but this story is very different. The author worries that this influential book will lead us to consider the concept of the life cycle of literature in unhelpful ways.

\"Rather than join Baker in mourning the long dead, we should draw attention to and drum up support for efforts to keep books alive, if only momentarily.\"

The Filtering of America Online

Wired has this one about AOL and RuleSpace joining forces in implementing filtering software. Although civil liberties advocates are still skeptical, RuleSpace and AOL report that the filter has been working well due to content recognition technology, parental controls and user feedback. Proponents feel that if AOL is using it, it has to be good.

Censorship in Cartoons

Lee Hadden writes: \"Many of the cartoons
produced before 1950 used and satirized racial and
ethnic stereotypes. In an article in Friday\'s Wall Street
Journal, May 4,
2001, first page, \"Bunny in Blackface: Why Cartoon
Network Won\'t Run 12 Bugs
Pix: Its Plans for a June Retrospective Sparked
Concerns Over Taste; Two
Agendas Inside AOL.\"
Some of the Bugs Bunny cartoons produced during
World War II showed
racial and ethnic stereotypes against the Japanese and
Germans. Other Bugs
Bunny cartoons showed racial stereotypes and
demeaning situations that are
offensive to today\'s sensibilities.
The owners of the original Bugs Bunny cartoons did
not want these
offensive cartoons shown, even for historical
representations and
retrospective reviews. The control over the cartoons is
slipping, as is the
censorship efforts to prevent their being seen.
Read more about it in the Wall Street Journal.\"

You should be able to see some of them Here at Throttlebox.com

Emerging Technologies That Will Change Public Libraries

John Guscott says his report you may have seen here
before was updated on May
1 and has doubled in length.
Read the full report for an interesting look
into the future. They\'ve selected crucial technologies
that public library administrators, trustees, managers
and professionals should be watching.
Teleservice
Next Generation Online Publishing
Language and Translation Software
And several more.

Library cat attacks assistance dog

Alert reader Charles Davis sent along This Story from
ananova.com on a
man that filed a $1.5 million claim against a
California city, after a cat who lives in the public library
allegedly attacked
his dog.
The cat was apparently uninjured.
The cat is featured on the
library\'s
website
, and even has it\'s own FAQ. They say it\'s usually lounging on
bookshelves or cabinets
and is popular with the library\'s readers.
The man says his assistance dog was attacked by
LC moments after they entered the library in
Escondido.MGTC passed along Two more Stories on the same thing.
I don\'t quite know what to say on this one, some
animals just get along like, well, cats and dogs.

Nicholson Baker\'s Predjudices

Lee Hadden writes \"While many librarians and
library supporters have criticized Nicholson
Baker\'s attack on library stewardship in his book
\"Double Fold,\" few have
picked up on his sartorial prejudices against male
librarians wearing
bowties. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal on
May 4, 2001, on page
W17 by Joseph Epstein, \"Fit to be Tied: The Enemies of
Civilization Find a
New Target, Just Below the Chin.\" describes and
illustrates this prejudice
agaisnt bowties.


Mr. Epstein notes that Mr. Baker \"...seems to have his
villains neatly
turned out in bowties: A man named Verner Clapp is a
\"polymathic bowtie
wearer,\" and the historian and former Librarian of
Congress Daniel Boorstein
is described as a \"chronic bowtie wearer.\"


If Mr. Baker is mistrustful of male librarians simply
because they wear
bowties, then he is seeing a trend to maybe match the
old stereotype of the
female librarian in hairbun, breastwatch, and reading
glasses on a string of
fake pearls, finger poised to go \"Shush!\" I am thus
tempted to join the ranks
and change my work uniform to something more in
keeping with guild
guidelines. I might trade in my four-in-ones for the
Daniel Moyniham look.
But then, I might not.\"

Exit Gutenberg ?

The Atlantic Monthly has a Story on eBook World conference in New York. They say the consensus from the conference was that digital delivery of most \"print\" is inevitable. I guess only time will tell if they were right.

Out of Print, But Into Digital from Wired, takes a look at octavo.com a company that uses digital technology to capture images of rare books, manuscripts and other materials on CD-ROMs.
Seems like a more useful eBook for now.

The Library Buildings Boom

LA Times Story on the new Central Library and the name that is stiring up some Controversy.

The Story from Seattle is a bit different, it mostly focuses on the team designing the new Central Library. The library is busy evolving even before it gets built.

Hopefully to avoid The Mess in Paris. The new National Library which has \"stupendously impractical architecture\", a large stairway that is slippery in the rain and open to the winds, awkwardly structured spaces for both researchers and staff, impractically situated toilets and so on.

Wanted: Loveable Hero for Copyright Battle

Lisa Bowman writes...
Groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union, American Library Association and EFF have been wildly successful overturning crackdowns on Internet content, including the Communications Decency Act. But so far, they\'ve been on the losing side of battles to protect free speech in the face of corporate copyright owners seeking unprecedented digital privileges--battles such as the DeCSS case. [more...] from ZDNet.

American Copyright Initiative Goes Eurpoean

John McNaughton writes... \"The RIAA is so obsessed with the supposed threat of the internet to its members\' prosperity, it is prepared to go to unbelievable lengths to stamp out that threat. Readers of this column will be aware that the RIAA is suing a US magazine for publishing the code of a small computer program called DeCSS that unscrambles DVD files so that Linux users can play their own disks. What is perhaps less well known is that a company that prints the DeCSS code on a T-shirt is also being sued. Sooner or later, free societies are going to have to rein in the pretensions and power of the RIAA. If this nonsense isn\'t stopped, the days when you could do what you please with your own hard disk are numbered.\"
[more...] from The Observer.

All Your Books Are Belong To Us

\"Your libraries are on the way to destruction,\" claimed the enemy cataloger. \"You have no chance to survive make your time. HA HA HA HA ....\" Solution? Take off every \"zig\"!! Move zig. For great justice.

Mitch Freedman elected ALA President, says \'First Daughter\'

Mitch Freedman has won the ALA election, says First Daughter Jenna Freedman (a librarian in New Rochelle, NY). An email sent this afternoon to friends and other supporters read:

\"The President-Elect apologizes for not sending this message out himself; he\'s got a work thing he can\'t get out of at the moment. Feel free to pass the news along to people whose e-mail addresses I don\'t have on me... And someone call Sandy!\"

Read on for the estimated vote count... -- Read More

A Google of Google Stories

Research Buzz says that the Usenet archives are back. You can now search back to May 1995 and find all the old stupid things you said. Google Groups

Techreview has a Story on the next generation of smart search engines.

Wired has A Look at Monika Henzinger, the director of research at Google, and her life as a \"woman\".She says, \"I\'m a scientist. I really think of myself as a scientist.\"

The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine is everything you ever wanted to know on the subject.

InternetWeek takes A Look at google\'s guts. They have about 8,000 servers, had 10.9 million unique visitors in March, has indexed 1.3 Web billion pages on over a petabyte of storage, and does it all on Linux.

Some Thoughts on the Digital Divide

As the growth of the online population continues upward, the digital divide is narrowing and reasons for being outside of the e-arena may now be more a result of choosing to remain there. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.

Syndicate content Syndicate content