Great Library of Alexandria

Lee Hadden writes:\"Erling Hoh has an article in today\'s (May 16, 2001) Washington Times
about the re-creation of the \"Great Library\" of Alexandria in Egypt. This
article describes the history of the ancient library, and how the new one
is built and how it will be run.


For more information about the Great Library of Alexandria project,
read more about it at The Washington Times

Happy Birthday WWW

17 May 1991
10 years ago today was the first General release of the WWW on central CERN machines.

Check out w3.org for more, including the original Presentation to \"C5\" Committee.

It\'s such a cute age, isn\'t it?

Freedom of Weird Expression in Libraries?

BJ Hampton writes \"Who wants to stand up for the “civil rights” of the anonymous toe-sucker who recently made an appearance at the Antelope Valley Community College Library? The current debates about internet filtering are apropos here. Do professional librarians truly want to abandon their role as trusted sources of information for their communities to become dumping grounds for any view, irrespective of its accuracy, honesty, appropriateness, and values? Regrettably, many have confused the first amendment’s prohibition against government regulation of speech and expression with a guarantee of an audience or a tax-payer funded forum. If such is the case, then the toe-sucker deserves praise and support as a “bold presenter of a minority view”, rather than prosecution.
Libraries must not allow the glitter of new technology to blind them to the need for safety, security, and judgment exercised for the benefit of their community. This story obviously highlights problems of standard crime prevention, but should also raise issues regarding the role of the librarian’s judgment in setting standards for the allocation of library resources.\"


Full Story

Harry Potter and the Ivory Tower

James Nimmo writes:\"Professors are drawing
parallels between Harry Potter stories and classic
medieval legends, proposing that medieval archetypes
are persistent throughout popular culture.\"

You can read the Full Story at the NY Times.

Future of the Internet

Margaret was nice enough to send along This
Story
on a brave new plan to start \"splinternets\".
The author says the current one Internet Is Not
Enough because the Internet is subject to substantial
regulation. The solution is more Internets, not more
regulations.
Future networks could offer porn-free
surfing—others, porn-only, perhaps with privacy
guarantees. Maybe a library only internet too?

Library & Information Week in Australia

Jane Edinger
writes \"This week is Library and Information Week in
Australia. If you would like information about the week
visit alia.org.au/alw
If you would like to participate in an online quiz
that is part of the activities organised for LIW, please
visit
www.illogical.com.au/alia/
\"


And Desly Ryan adds:\"
Next week downunder in God\'s great country of
Australia we will be celebrating \'Australian Library and
Information Week\' the theme this year is
\"Libraries Knowledge Outlook\".
At our branch here we are having Author/Sailor Lesley
Black come on Wednesday morning and tell us about
her adventures sailing around the Pacific Ocean.
On Thursday Aboriginal Artists, brother and sister Clive
and Hazel Cowburn will be here explaining the motifs of
their artwork and demonstrating how unique aboriginal
art is. Both events are open to the public and we hope
the locals will come and enjoy them. Some school and
kindergarten classes will be coming to the art
workshop and we will be doing a mural to hang in the
library. -- Read More

Public Libraries have until 2002

From Excite. Public libraries now have until July of 2002 to certify that they have filters. ALA and the ACLU were at the forefront.
\"Public libraries will have until July 2002 to certify that they
have adopted Internet filtering technologies required by a new federal law, under terms
of an agreement reached in U.S. district court.

The agreement came during a hearing on the twin lawsuits filed by the American Civil
Liberties Union and the American Library Association challenging portions of the
Children\'s Internet Protection Act.\".

Read the brief story here

It\'s true: They are copyrighting the law

The bad news about the copyright grab just keeps on coming. It really looks like we are losing something important, and we have to act. Here is a story in the San Diego Union Tribune about how actual laws are being copyrighted - and the copyright found to be valid in court cases, including a Federal appeals court. In other words, governments are not free to distribute the whole of the law - in some cases you have to buy it from a private party in order to read it, or your library has to buy it (as long as that is still allowed - publishers are working on that now). This is so bad you\'d think it is a hoax, but it seems to be real. Slashdot has a discussion on this article from a few days ago.

Minneapolis PL bans chess

Salon is carrying an AP article that says the Minneapolis Public Library has temporarily banned the game of chess because the players were becoming disruptive.

I guess some people just can\'t stand chess nuts boasting in an open foyer.

Academic Libraries a Key Target and a Tough Sell

Today\'s Chronicle has a very good Look At the dicey relationship between academic libraries and all the new for-profit cybraries.

Professors are afraid they make it too easy for students to plagiarize and the sparten collections and impending dot-doom that hovers over them leaves academic librarians uneasy about using them.
This is the best look at this topic I\'ve read to date, check it out if this area is of interest.

\"Library users, he says, like being able to look online to see what an e-book offers. But many apparently looked only long enough to decide if it was worth walking to the library to do what students and professors have traditionally done -- check out a good, old-fashioned book\"

Raising Money For Libraries

Lee Hadden writes: \"Well, I guess I didn\'t know the proper way to go about rasing money
for my library. The article in today\'s (May 16, 2001) Washington Times by
Kevin Chafee, \"Male guests stand out at Athens library benefit\" shows how
to use diplomats to raise 30K for the Gennadius Library in Athens, Greece.


\"There was a direct link between costume and cause, of course, which
Mrs. Nitze was sure to explain before guests took their seats in the
drawing room for a pre-dinner concert of Greek Sephardic music played by
Hesperus on traditional instruments. The library, which houses books,
archives and art documenting the post-antiquity Hellenic world, also
includes many treasures from the eastern Mediterranean, including Turkey.\"
\"About $30,000 was raised at the dinner (mostly from \"Americans who
love Greece,\" library president Catherine Vanderpool reported).\"

Looting the Library

TechReview has This Amazing Story by Seth Shulman on what he calls \"Looting the Library\" by publishers.

He says publishers new greedy \"pay-per-use model\" for information content that will largely shut libraries out. No kind words for Pat Schroeder who he quotes as saying that publishers have to \"learn to push back\" against libraries.
He points out Peter Chernin, president and chief operating officer of Rupert Murdoch\'s News Corporation is calling for legislation that \"guarantees publishers\' control of not only the integrity of an original work, but of the extent and duration of users\' access to that work, the availability of data about the work and restrictions on forwarding the work to others\". You can see what that would do.

I agree with him when he says:\"Too much is at stake to let the publishing industry undo the careful copyright balance we have all come to rely upon.\"

Where is the outrage on this that I see everyday over filters??

Internet access in Rwanda

Margaret writes:

\"Can Rwanda use new technology to escape poverty? Ben Hewitt looks at the challenges ahead.\" This article gives an interesting perspective on Internet access in Rwanda, one of the poorest countries in the world. The Government\'s plans are detailed and useful statistics are supplied. Those who are concerned with siiues souuronding the \'digital divide\' will find it of particular interest. \"

Information access policy

Someone writes \"
A recent article from the Bulletin of the American Society
for Information Science and Technology, \"Information
policy: from the local to the global\" is worth a read. The
article reviews information access policies at various
geopolitical levels including international, regional,
national and local. The impact of copyright, the \'global
information economy\', the difficulties of administering
information policy, telecentres etc are all outlined. \"


Full Story

The Library Hot Sheets

Bob Cox sent along This Story from SFGate story on the most frequently stolen books list.

They say the American Library Association has taken a first step, e-mailing hundreds of libraries around the country and asking them to list their most-stolen items.

They say that copies of the Bible tend to walk out of public libraries and never return.

Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

I\'m way beind on everything here, so you probably already heard, but I feel the need to post this anyways.

Douglas Adams died at age 49 of a heart attack in Santa Barbara, CA. If there was a funnier book than The Hitchhiker\'s Guide I\'ve never read it.

Bob Cox sent along This Great Tribute as well.

Skim It and Weep

Lee Hadden writes:\"There is an excellent article on the problem of aliteracy, a scourge of
people who can read, but won\'t. Read more about it in the Washington Post.
\"The No-Book Report: Skim It and Weep : More and More Americans Who Can
Read Are Choosing Not To. Can We Afford to Write Them Off?\" A survey shows
Americans are reading printed versions of magazines, newspapers and books
less and less. \"Does this really surprise anyone?Truly sad\"

The Full Story has several interesting interviews and examples, it\'s worth the read.

Britain leads the way with European library project

Charles
Davis
writes \"Britain has moved a step closer
towards European
integration with the creation of a pan
continental virtual
library.

The British Library is co-ordinating a
project which will allow
users to search for and access
digital and other collections
from the European participants.

A 30-month co-operative project will
provide the
groundwork on which to build the
pan-European service.

The project unites the eight national
libraries of Finland,
Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
Portugal, Slovenia,
Switzerland, and the UK.

The European Library (TEL) project
will be boosted with
funding of 1.2 million euros from the
European
Commission\'s Information Societies
Technology (IST)
research programme.

Detailed information on how the
project is progressing can
be found on the TEL website at
europeanlibrary
.org.
\"

Internet cafes closed in Tehran

Reuters reports that police in Tehran shut down 400 Internet cafes in the city last week. One cafe owner is quoted as saying, "The rumors are that the police, the police intelligence unit, the (telecommunications agency) and other ministries are behind this. They have their own motives and reasons."

Read the story.

The porn crusaders

Salon has a long Story on the AFA and the fight it started against Yahoo!.

It\'s a good look at why Yahoo! caved in, and what the AFA is up to, so far they\'ve been rather unsuccessful, but they don\'t seem to be letting up. Funniest quote I\'ve heard in quite sometime.

\"I believe we can make a major difference. We can change the Internet.\" - Patrick Trueman legal counsel to the right-wing American Family Association.

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