Budget Woes at the Library of Virginia

Lee Hadden writes:\" According to an article in the March/April official newsletter of the
Library of Virginia, there will be projected service cuts there this year.
Under Republican Governor Gilmore\'s budget, the Library of Virginia\'s
funding will be cut 17.75%, starting as early as July 1st for fiscal year
2002.
A 54 year backlog of archival material will be curtailed due to a lack
of staff and funds to purchase archival supplies, delaying further the
release of these historic records. Saturday hours may be eliminated. Money
to preserve and conserve historic collections will be curtailed
significantly. Funding will be eliminated for the construction and
improvement of public library facilities across the commonwealth.
Nolan T. Yelich, Librarian of Virginia, said, \"These reductions are
compounded by the fact that the Library has never fully recovered from a 27
per cent reduction in its operating budget during the revenue shortfalls of
the early 1990\'s...\"
Further information about the Library of Virginia can be found at
their website of: http://www.lva.lib.va.us\"

Awareness Exchange Site Launched to Protect Kids Against Net Perils

It\'s called the Awareness Exchange, and it\'s goal is to help protect kids around the world from falling into the more dangerous realms of the Internet, including those inhabited by pedophiles, cybercriminals and racists. Some of the headings include - \"Yahoo! racist chatrooms \'untouchable\', Supreme Court to consider online porn law, Net crime plans unveiled, DotSafe, dot sure and eSchola, Focussing on filtering, Families... And So On - Tech Week: Protecting Kids Online, Parents believe Internet has positive impact on children, Computer shops to block child porn on internet, Home Office backtracks on its argument that UK laws exist to protect children online.\" There is also a discussion forum, a hotline and other resources available. To visit the site, Click Here.

Library audit finds 12% of books lost

Bob Cox says Dallas News is running A Story that says 12 percent of its books are gone, and the library system has no collection agency for pursuing nearly $3.5 million in fines for overdue and lost materials.

Is there such thing as an acceptable loss rate?

Unreliability of Health Information on the Web

Stephen Francoeur writes \"The NY Times reports in this story on the findings of a study published this week in the JAMA about the unreliability of health information on the Web. \"


Not too suprising, I guess, they found that most of the time, health information on the Internet is hard to find, hard to read and often incorrect or incomplete, even on the best sites.

New Book Reviews

Casey writes \"I don\'t know if you\'ve \"caught wind\" of this new scheme to charge publishers for book reviews, but I think it is absolutely the most horrible idea I\'ve seen in the book world. Makes me grind my teeth just to think about it. And to think they actually believe librarians will read these \"reviews\"!

Anyhow, a new Uncle Frank tackles the issue here at
newpages.com
\"

Little bits o\' lit

The Chicago Tribune has an article about two alternative distribution channels for literature: the Chapter-A-Day e-mail service; and Travelman Short Stories, which are being sold as fan-folded sheets from a machine in a London Underground station.

A quote from an American short-story author about the vending machine: "I don\'t think it would work here. So few people read short stories in this country. Selling them in the same way you sell gum or condoms, I don\'t think it would appeal to the same people who read short stories."

Finding Free Internet Access for Those Without

Rebecca Weiner of The New York Times writes, \"Prodded by high-profile efforts to close the gap between students with access to technology and students without, 98 percent of the country\'s public schools have been wired for Internet connections. But for many low-income students, that access disappears once schools close their doors for the summer.\" [more...] from The Daily News.

Technology Changes, Libraries Evolve

Richard Khavkine writes, \"Once repositories of unique and primary sources such as newspapers, government documents and journals, public libraries have steadily but noticeably conformed to the electronic times.\" [read more...] from The Monroe News Online.

Libraries in the Ancient World

Lionel Gasson has written a book about the history of libraries dating all the way back to ancient times. Who would have ever thought libraries to have such a colorful history dating all the way back to dinosaurs...well okay that may be an exaggeration since we all know the only readable text for that time was the Thesaurus...(ahem, sorry) ... Anyway, check out this review by Peter Jones at Books Online.

Napsterized

Lee Hadden writes: \" Steven Levy has an
interesting article in the May 28th issue of
Newsweek on what it is like to have your book placed
on the Internet for
people to download for free. A discussion of writers\'
rights, copyright
infringement, and the World Wide Web.
Steven Levy. \"The Day I Got Napsterized: First they
Came for
Metallica. Then They Came for Tom Clancy. And Now
They Came for Me..\"
Newsweek. May 28, 2001. Page 44.
Read more about it at:
MSNBC

Map Maker Fired Over Arctic Chart a Cult Hero

Someone sent along This LATimes Story on Ian Thomas, that dude that got fired by U.S. Geological Survey when he posted a map of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge\'s caribou calving areas on a federal Web site. I\'m still not sure who to believe on this one.

It\'s a good story because they have a quote from Fred Stoss:

He became a cult hero because this is the story that everyone wanted to hear,\" Stoss said. \"There is urban legend growing out of this.\"


See also, the new Ian Thomas Web Site

Higher Access Rates Good For Libraries?

AOL announced that it is raising its monthly fee to $23.90, its first price hike in more than three years, and This News.com story says that competitors such as EarthLink won\'t be far behind in trying to boost rates.I\'ve seen elsewhere that DSL and Cable Modem companies are raising rates as well.

According to a recent survey by Telecommunications Reports International, the number of U.S. homes with Internet access dropped slightly during the first quarter of 200 (Let\'s just ass-u-me it\'s accurate).

So... Does all this point to more people using their friendly neighborhood library to access the internet, and if so, is this even good for libraries?

Porn is mainstream, says NYT

Frank Rich reports in the New York Times that porn is not only big business, it\'s part of mainstream American entertainment.

As one person put it, \"We realized that when there are 700 million porn rentals a year, it can\'t just be a million perverts renting 700 videos each.\"

Collection development librarians, take note.

The State of Copyright Etc...

Worldwide Copyrights a Quagmire? from Wired on The Hague Convention.

Free Software Leaders Stand Together is an interesting rebuttle to some dumb things Microsoft said.

CNET has Professor warns of threat to free speech on how bad things are getting.

eBook Experiments

The Chronicle of Higher Education has a Report on The University of Virginia and a new eBook program.

They have a few courses \"designed to take advantage of two of the most celebrated features of digital textbooks -- their capacity to hold reams of data and their ability to let readers easily search for any word or phrase.\"

The books still have bugs, sometimes crash, and the screens are small, but it\'s interesting to see people doing this sort of thing.

UVA\'s Page

Son of CIPA

The Who Is E-mailing Our Kids Act was introduced in Congress last week as H.R. 1846. If it becomes law, this bill would require schools and libraries in the e-rate program to block access to anonymous e-mail and Web surfing services. Presumably, we\'ll then know who is sending e-mail to our kids.

In related news, giant pink dragons are playing croquet with leprechauns on my front lawn.

Supreme Court to Review The Child Online Protection Act

The U.S. Supreme Court said on Monday it would hear a Justice Department appeal aimed at allowing the federal government to enforce a 1998 law intended to protect minors from Internet pornography. Expect a decision this fall.

Story from Yahoo!

Librarians and Moss

Guy writes \"The guy who runs centralbooking.com said nation\'s librarians, a group that gets riled up about as often as a tray of peat moss in this article
Funny! He obviously doesn\'t know any librarians! \"
It\'s from another review of \"Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper\"


Claudia Bennett writes:\"Nicholson argues that the American people have been \"tricked\" into thinking that newsprint and books turn to dust, and librarians have unconsciously destroyed priceless information, including some off-the-record remarks Richard Nixon once made. Nicholson tells McHenry: \"There are so many bizarre contradictions in all of this. . .I found myself kind of moaning and saying--typing--\'It\'s worse than you thought. Entire Interview\"

Cornered Cartoon

My wife saw this cartoon in the paper today. We haven\'t had a funny one here in a while. I don\'t know how long they will keep it up, so if you miss it, I will have it on my site tomorrow.

Apocryphal e-mails

Lee Hadden Writes:\"We should all be aware of the danger of passing along apocryphal
e-mails, whether they are about exaggerated stories or myths or urban
legends. A healthy dose of skepticism is necessary to prevent the spread of
some seriously incorrect stories.
An excellent example of what harm can happen when an e-mail is
believed and sent out without checking the truth of the story can be found
in an article in yesterday\'s Washington Post. A woman had forwarded a story
that people were sabotaging gasoline pumps in an attempt to spread AIDS,
and she has seriously regretted ever since her forwarding the e-mail
message to others. Read about her Many Travails at the Washington Post
site: or read her story in a paper version: Leef Smith, \"Apocryphal E-mail
Bedevils Va. Sender.\" Thursday, May 17, 2001, page B01.\"

I\'ve always been a huge fan of
Urban Legends, and hope to start my own someday... something about me and Shania Twain or some such thing.

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