Lemony Snicket: "Librarians have suffered enough"

Children's author, who has himself been 'falsely accused of crimes' wants to honour those who have stood up to pressure from would-be book banners.
"Librarians have suffered enough", according to Lemony Snicket, who is setting up a new annual US prize "honouring a librarian who has faced adversity with integrity and dignity intact".

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/31/lemony-snicket-prize-librarians-book-bans

Amazon’s latest page-turner: book publishing

http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2022840140_amazonpublishingxml.html

After forever changing book-selling, Amazon is now embarked on a wide-ranging venture that seeks to alter the book-publishing end of the business. Company officials see it as an experiment where they can tinker with new ways to connect authors and readers.

Melvil Dewey, the Weirdo Father of Librarianship

From Bitch Magazine:
It's no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for women.

Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System (as well as co-founder of the American Library Journal and the American Library Association), is often praised for having created a field of jobs for women in the US. In 1883, Dewey was hired as the head librarian at Columbia College (which later turned into Columbia University), and he soon convinced the trustees to let him open a library school. At the time, Columbia College only allowed women into a special women's college, so Dewey's plans to invite women to join the library school were controversial. His first class was comprised of 20 people, 17 of whom were women. While many have focused on Dewey's success in educating and opening up jobs for women, attention is rarely paid to why he felt women would make great librarians. Spoiler alert: he held some pretty sexist beliefs.

In The Feminization of Libraranship, Tawny Sverdlin asks whether Dewey's opening up the library school for women was actually the achievement that it seems:

The opportunity for women to enter library school at Columbia College...proved to be a double-edged sword in terms of women's opportunity for advancement. Melvil Dewey championed women as librarians and library school educators but placed caps on their achievement in terms of gender straight away. According to Dewey's blatant double standard, women had to demonstrate truly remarkable ability or be relegated to perpetual underling status. -- Read More

Literary Twitter’s Best Tweets

So, to present literary Twitter in its best possible light, we are returning again to those most widely followed on literary Twitter, but this time, looking at which Tweets got the most favorites, we are highlighting each literary Twitterer’s best tweet. Here you’ll find much wry humor, gossip, lots of politics, Margaret Atwood flirting with a Twitter-famous comedian, and even a surprising amount of insight crammed into 140 characters. They may be enough to win over some fresh converts.
http://www.themillions.com/2014/02/oh-the-favorites-youll-give-literary-twitters-best-tweets...

The Magic Of Libraries

The Magic Of Libraries from Emily&Anne on Vimeo.

Toronto libraries flooded with requests for 'Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story'

The Toronto Public Library had received just shy of 500 hold requests for Crazy Town before the book became available Monday afternoon.

Talk about demand. With that many requests, considering the library's 21-day borrowing policy, it would take 10,500 days (or more than 28 years) for everyone with a current hold request to get their hands on a single copy of Crazy Town. Thankfully for them, the Toronto Public Library has ordered 145 copies, which would cut the best-case waiting period down to about 72 days.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/dailybrew/toronto-libraries-inundated-demand-crazy-town-rob-f...

Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users

The tl;dr version is that Adobe is going to start pushing for ebook vendors to provide support for the new DRM in March, and when July rolls Adobe is going to force the ebook vendors to stop supporting the older DRM. (Hadrien Gardeur, Paul Durrant, and Martyn Daniels concur on this interpretation.)

This means that any app or device which still uses the older Adobe DRM will be cut off. Luckily for many users, that penalty probably will not affect readers who use Kobo or Google reading apps or devices; to the best of my knowledge neither uses the Adobe DRM internally. And of course Kindle and Apple customers won’t even notice, thanks to those companies’ wise decision to use their own DRM.

http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2014/02/03/adobe-require-new-epub-drm-july-expects-abandon...

Guns @ Your Library

This story from the Seattle Public Library is a bit dated, but worth reading.

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

That man, Dave Bowman, lives in Seattle and has a library card (which he uses, he noted in an email to KUOW), and said that he demanded the policy change on behalf of all gun owners. He described himself as “neither a conservative, nor liberal, but a libertarian.”

“I noticed one day that the library’s rules stated that firearms were not allowed on library property except by law enforcement,” Bowman said by email to KUOW. “I knew this rule was in violation of state law (and common sense) and brought it to their attention.”

Joe Fithian, the head of security for the library, replied to Bowman: “Much the same as eating and sleeping or being intoxicated are not against the law, (guns) are against our rules of conduct.”

But Bowman refused to back down and within two months, the library announced to its staff that it would drop the gun ban. Staff members could ask questions, but administrators were firm: On Nov. 4, the library would allow guns.

Do you allow guns at your library? Are there specific restrictions? Please comment below.

Deposed library dean still on NDSU's dime

http://www.inforum.com/event/article/id/425489/

News about the state of the library at North Dakota State University. They'll put this behind a paywall pretty quick.

North Dakota State was poised to fire Dean of Libraries Michele Reid in December. Instead, a settlement agreement was reached to pay her close to $300,000 over two years.

New York Public Library Central Information

New York Public Library Central Information

Take a look at this picture to see some serious card catalogs at NYPL

PBS Newshour interview with Carolyn Forché - author of "Poetry of Witness"

The poets featured in Carolyn Forché's anthology "Poetry of Witness" have endured extreme conditions: warfare, censorship, forced exile. The Georgetown professor and poet herself calls the collection an "outcry of the soul." Jeffrey Brown sat down with Forché to discuss this style of writing and its enduring power.

Mold Damages About 600,000 Books at U. of Missouri Libraries Off-Campus Storage Facility

University of Missouri Libraries officials face tough choices as they consider what to do with 600,000 mold-covered books at an off-campus storage facility.

 

http://www.infodocket.com/2014/01/29/mold-causes-damage-to-more-than-600000-books-at-u-of-missouri-libraries-off-campus-storage-facility/

Book News: U.N.-Backed Report Finds 'Shocking' Levels of Youth Illiteracy

Story at NPR.org

Arizona HB 2439 - unnecessary legislation that will hurt Arizona libraries

Library districts need to adapt to the needs of their communities. A one-size-fits-all tax levy simply will not work. The library districts in Arizona have never been accused of abusing their authority, and, what’s more, they provide valuable service to all of the libraries in their geographic areas.

Read more from The Hipster Librarian.

Reimagining the book - The End Of Passive

http://aenism.com/end-of-passive/
"Now imagine that a reader can choose to be any character in the story. At any point in the book, the events are premeditated by the prior decisions of an instance of a character played by another reader and your actions is going to determine how another reader’s story will play out. With each juncture, your story is matched with someone else’s so your fates intertwines. With a tree like this, there will be multiple endings and not every branch will lead to an ending. Some unfortunately lead to the demise of a character. Perhaps only a few branches for each character will lead it to one of its favorable endings. Like how you may still be fatally struck by lightning in real life despite living healthily, your encounters are out of your control so you will never have ultimate control of your fate."

This is how Google is killing the Web

http://pando.com/2014/01/27/this-is-how-google-is-killing-the-web/
But you won’t find these great sites on the first page of Google results—you might not find them on the first 10. As a result, these services, some of them genuinely life-changing, get lost in the dark recesses of the Internet. Even when you find these gems, you probably won’t think to access them the next time you log on. Their biggest challenge is finding a large enough audience to create a habit around their product.

Creating a habit around a product is limited by the way we browse the Web.

Take a moment and think about the browser user experience. It hasn’t changed much in the past 20 years and since the days of Netscape, we’ve been confined to a search box. We need to know exactly what we’re looking for, either through a search or by typing in the exact web address.

Queens Library president gets $390G salary, luxe office makeover while shedding 130 jobs

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/queens/queens-library-president-390g-shedding-130-jobs-a...

Last year, Queens Library President Thomas Galante was paid more than the mayor or the MTA chairman, and spent $140,000 to renovate his offices at the Central Library. Meanwhile, Galante eliminated nearly 130 library jobs through layoffs and attrition over the past five years.

11th Annual BookFinder.com Report Out-of-print and in demand

http://www.bookfinder.com/books/bookfinder_report/BookFinder_Report_2013.mhtml

In this the 11th annual BookFinder.com Report we publish a list of the top 100 most searched for out of print book titles from the previous 12 months. The books featured in this 2013 edition of the report run the gambit of publishing from true to life memoirs to science fiction, cookery to crochet, and firearms to photography.

Most of the books published over the course of history are out of print today. For hundreds of years the lifecycle for the vast majority of books has been the same: a book is written, it is published, many people buy and enjoy it, the book begins to fall out of favor and then publishers stop printing copies and the book falls out of print. This happens to exceptional books, average books and books that perhaps should never have seen the light of day in the first place. This lifecycle remained the same from the days Gutenberg walked the earth until the very recent past; a book being out of print meant it was a dead book. Once a book was dead the only way you were going to read a copy was to find someone to lend, give or sell it to you, or convince a publisher that issuing a new pressing was going to be financially viable.

Subterranean trove of books, papers at risk in NYS Education Building

http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/State-Library-s-tough-calls-on-what-to-save-what-515...

It is an eerie bibliophile's netherworld, accessible by cramped cages of creaky service elevators, dark and cool and redolent of mildew, old leather bindings and sloughing paper that litters the floor like snowflakes. There is no climate control among miles of metal shelves, and accessing the hundreds of thousands of volumes is an arduous task. From the time a patron requests a book at the State Library, it typically takes two days to retrieve. A clerk drives a van four blocks around the Plaza, descends into the stacks, hunts among the haphazard holdings and drives back with the book.

[Thanks Elaine!]

Library cuts trigger fears of Canadian knowledge drain

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Library+cuts+trigger+fears+knowledge+drain/9432991/story.html
“With libraries closing, there’s content … that’s no longer available to the users be they researchers, members of the public, people who are developing policy in government departments and that’s always worrying,” said Marie DeYoung, president of the Canadian Library Association and librarian at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

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