Amazon Killed the Bookstore. So It's Opening a Bookstore

Amazon Books, as the new store is called, will be like any other Main Street bookstore (remember those?), except that Amazon will use the troves of data it collects from its online customers to stock the shelves. That means its book displays will feature real Amazon book reviews, and the store will showcase books that have amassed the most pre-orders online. The books will also come with Amazon’s trademark low price tags.

From Amazon Killed the Bookstore. So It's Opening a Bookstore | WIRED

What DO students and parents think a library is? Reddit : Libraries

I'm never quite sure what incoming undergraduates expect from university libraries. I know that when they walk in they may realize that it is the largest library that they have ever been inside. Maybe, the students try to picture how comfortable they would be studying here and assess the current environment on whatever given day their tour comes through. I just want to know what they think a "library" is and what exactly they expect from it.

From an interesting post at Reddit What DO students and parents think a library is? : Libraries

Entire editorial staff of Elsevier journal Lingua resigns over high price, lack of open access

The entire editorial staff of the prestigious academic title Lingua have resigned in protest over the high cost of subscribing to the journal, and the refusal of the journal's publisher, Elsevier, to convert the title completely to open access. The open access model allows anyone, whether an academic or not, to read a journal online for free. Currently, most academic journals are funded by subscriber payments; with open access journals, the model is flipped around, with institutions paying to publish their papers.

From Entire editorial staff of Elsevier journal Lingua resigns over high price, lack of open access | Ars Technica UK

Google Searches Put Consumers at Risk

The effect may be a more pleasant online experience for someone who is perceived to have more income. In the same way that startups have put a premium on cutting out human interaction for those who can afford it, adlessness can be a luxury for those who choose to buy ad blockers so their webpages load faster. But distinct ad landscapes aren’t just about seeing more elegant corporate messages, or encountering fewer pop-up ads—or even none at all. Companies and individuals are working together to target consumers on a personal level, to use their most vulnerable Google searches against them.

“Fraudsters buy this data,” Waller said. “It’s easy to access, easy to buy, easy to find. They use it sometimes for really shocking, outright fraud and theft. Sometimes it’s a little more subtle than that.”

From Google Searches Put Consumers at Risk - The Atlantic

Andrew Carnegie, Librarian

Andrew Carnegie died in 1919, and I became a librarian in 2012. In many ways, Carnegie’s idea of the library still affects my working life today, as it does many others in the library profession. With a staggering largess, Carnegie conspired to shape the library—both physically and professionally—into a service model of dull efficiency and grinding productivity, thereby transforming the library according to his own capitalist view of industry and labor. The thousands of Carnegie libraries scattered across the US stand as a testament both to his dictatorial generosity and to his crushing vision of higher education as workforce development. In this post, I take a brief look at Andrew Carnegie and the connection points among his philanthropy, the library profession, and the anti-intellectual pro-business forces at work in today’s higher education.

From Andrew Carnegie, Librarian — Scott W. H. Young

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Drunk Library History - Melvil Dewey - YouTube

Wherein Christian confronts the specter of Melvil Dewey and generally makes an ass out of himself. Melvil Dewey's contribution to Library Science was profound while he as a person was a lecherous bigot. Watch Urban Librarians Unite founder Christian Zabriskie wrestle with Dewey's complex nature after having few drinks

From Drunk Library History - Melvil Dewey - YouTube

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As U.S. Libraries Are Outsourced, Readers See Public Trust Erode

A Maryland company that runs public libraries has more than doubled in size in the past decade as governments seek savings. Bibliophile residents complain that an investment in knowledge and culture is being milked for profit.
Library Systems & Services LLC is running into opposition as it seeks to add the 24 libraries in Kern County, California, to its portfolio of 82 in six states, allowing the county to shed a unionized workforce of 118. The county north of Los Angeles would be the largest addition for LSSI since the firm, which is owned by Wayne, Pennsylvania-based Argosy Capital Group Inc., got into the book business in 1997.

From As U.S. Libraries Are Outsourced, Readers See Public Trust Erode - Bloomberg Business

Following Restructuring Harvard Libraries Report Large Savings

Harvard’s library system has reduced spending by $25 million in aggregate since 2009, largely due to a multi-year restructuring effort completed in 2012, according to an update distributed to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences prior to its meeting on Tuesday.

From Following Restructuring, Libraries Report Large Savings | News | The Harvard Crimson

Dartmouth, NSF aim to turn America's rural libraries into STEM centers

Dartmouth College will use a $3 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to further help small, rural libraries nationwide to improve public understanding of science.

From Dartmouth, NSF aim to turn America's rural libraries into STEM centers | EurekAlert! Science News

Digital Archive To Preserve History In Atlanta's Manuel's Tavern

In a few months' time, Atlanta's iconic watering hole and beloved neighborhood living room will close for renovation. A collaboration among three local academic institutions is underway to ensure that nearly 60 years of history hanging on the walls will be documented, annotated, and preserved for restoration after reopening.

What’s so special about Special Collections?

Patrons of modern libraries likewise expect the instant gratification of online viewing rather than having to pull print copies off the shelves, let alone jumping through the hoops necessary to obtain more restricted content. Having a pre-Carnegie access model in the age of Google Books is increasingly alienating to potential users.

From What’s so special about Special Collections? — Medium

Long Line at the Library? It’s Story Time Again

Story time is drawing capacity crowds at public libraries across New York and across the country at a time when, more than ever, educators are emphasizing the importance of early literacy in preparing children for school and for developing critical thinking skills. The demand crosses economic lines, with parents at all income levels vying to get in.

Many libraries have refashioned the traditional readings to include enrichment activities such as counting numbers and naming colors, as well as music and dance. And many parents have made story time a fixture in their family routines alongside school pickups and playground outings — and, for those who employ nannies, a nonnegotiable requirement of the job.

From Long Line at the Library? It’s Story Time Again - The New York Times

It’s hard to believe today, but 10 years ago Wikipedia was widely considered doomed

Wikipedia was founded in 2001, and for the first few years was mostly treated as curiosity by those outside of the Wikipedia “movement.” But Wikipedia grew in popularity, and in 2005 became the most popular reference site on the internet. Popularity led to intense media scrutiny. Most commentators considered Wikipedia a doomed experiment run by utopian radicals. To give a sense of this for those who weren’t following the controversy at the time or don’t remember, here are some examples of popular critiques of Wikipedia from 2005.

From It’s hard to believe today, but 10 years ago Wikipedia was widely considered a doomed experiment… — Medium

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Learning to Read. Again.

What does reverse outlining have to do with text mining? He might not realize it, but Aaron Hamburger, in a nice Opinionator essay that enumerates the virtues of outlining in reverse for creative writing, has made a fantastic justification for new research techniques of the digital humanities. Using his piece as a springboard, I argue here that historians would be well served to expand their notion of what it means to read—as oppose to analyze—a text or set of texts with digital methods.

From Learning to Read. Again.

Some public libraries home to rare and valuable treasures

When it comes to where one might find rare works of art or valuable historical artifacts, most people think of museums or perhaps the Boston Public Library, particularly after the high-profile “loss” earlier this year of valuable prints by Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt that were ultimately found 80 feet from where they should have been filed.

Many would be surprised to find, housed amid the book and DVD collections in many local public libraries, historical treasures ranging from the rare and valuable to the curious, such as Woburn’s swatch of the wool coat Abraham Lincoln was wearing when he was assassinated.

For the most part, local libraries are not in the business of actively collecting historical artifacts, but rather have amassed a hodgepodge of donated items of historical value and interest, said Jake Sadow, statewide digitization project archivist with the Boston Public Library.

From Some public libraries home to rare and valuable treasures - The Boston Globe

Phoenix libraries unveil treadmill desks

We've all been to the library to check out books, rent DVD's, and surf the web. But now at three Phoenix libraries you can do more; work out.

Fit Phoenix unveiled a new way for people to improve their health all while reading a book. These treadmill desks are available to use at three Phoenix libraries including; Palo Verde, Harmon, and Yucca.

"What you do is come to the library with your library card, check into the computer like you normally would with one of the normal , but it has a treamil with it, and you'll be able to walk slowly at 2 miles and hour while you use the computer," said Jon Brodsky.

From Phoenix libraries unveil treadmill desks - Story | KSAZ

Restoring the Long-Lost Sounds of Native American California

In November, researchers at UC Berkeley will begin a three-year project to restore and translate thousands of century-old audio recordings of Native California Indians. The collection was created by cultural anthropologists in the first half of the 20th century and is now considered the largest audio repository of California Indian culture in the world.

Nearly a third of the 2,713 recordings come from Ishi, the storied last member of the Yahi tribe who lived the last years of his life inside the University of California’s Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Ishi died in 1916 from tuberculosis. He was 54 years old.

From Restoring the Long-Lost Sounds of Native American California | The California Report | KQED News

When Book Lovers Guarded Their Prized Possessions With Tiny Artworks

Books aren’t quite an endangered species yet, and the Association of American Publishers reports that sales of physical books are actually on the rise. Nevertheless, many who consider themselves avid readers have still never seen a bookplate in person—which makes sense, considering the trend peaked around a century ago. In fact, the use of bookplates started much earlier, with the oldest known plates dating to mid-15th-century Germany.

From When Book Lovers Guarded Their Prized Possessions With Tiny Artworks | Collectors Weekly

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Hey Airbnb, take it easy on libraries

Libraries recently drew unexpected fire from Airbnb, one of tech's hottest startups. But the truth is libraries play an essential role in fostering technological innovation in communities.

From Hey Airbnb, take it easy on libraries, they're leading the charge in tech more than ever - TechRepublic

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What Libraries Can (Still) Do

I’m an optimist. I think the pessimists and the worriers—and this includes some librarians—are taking their eyes off the ball. The library has no future as yet another Internet node, but neither will it relax into retirement as an antiquarian warehouse. Until our digital souls depart our bodies for good and float away into the cloud, we retain part citizenship in the physical world, where we still need books, microfilm, diaries and letters, maps and manuscripts, and the experts who know how to find, organize, and share them.

From What Libraries Can (Still) Do by James Gleick | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

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