What Open-Access Publishing Actually Costs

Mr. Eve sees open access as a way to make publishing cheaper by spreading the costs across a large number of institutions. For organizations that aren’t motivated by profit, he thinks the model will work. As universities have faced budget cuts, he said, traditional publishers have continued to collect large amounts of revenue.

"They may have a different idea, in the mind of shareholders, as to what 'sustainable' actually means," Mr. Eve said.

From What Open-Access Publishing Actually Costs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Official Release of TPP Text Confirms Massive Loss to Canadian Public Domain

Unchanged from the leaked text is the confirmation of the extension of the term of copyright to life of the author plus an additional 70 years. This marks a 20 year extension in the term of copyright, dealing a massive blow to access to Canadian heritage and resulting in hundreds of millions in cost.  For example, there are 22 Governor-General award winning fiction and non-fiction authors whose work will not enter the public domain for decades.  These include Margaret Laurence, Gabrielle Roy, Marian Engel, Marshall McLuhan, and Donald Creighton.

From Official Release of TPP Text Confirms Massive Loss to Canadian Public Domain - Michael Geist

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LISNews Author Spotlight

Benjamin Griffith Brawley (April 22, 1882 - February 1, 1939) was a prominent African-American author and educator. Several of his books were considered standard college texts, including The Negro in Literature and Art in the United States (1918) and New Survey of English Literature (1925).

Born in 1882 in Columbia, South Carolina, Brawley was the second son of Edward McKnight Brawley and Margaret Dickerson Brawley. He studied at Atlanta Baptist College (renamed Morehouse College), graduating in 1901, earned his second BA in 1906 from the University of Chicago, and received his Master's degree from Harvard University in 1908.Brawley taught in the English departments at Atlanta Baptist College, Howard University, and Shaw University.

Full Wikipedia entry and list of publications here -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Griffith_Brawley

Books by Brawley, Benjamin Griffith
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/4226

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LISNews Author Spotlight

Benjamin Griffith Brawley (April 22, 1882 - February 1, 1939) was a prominent African-American author and educator. Several of his books were considered standard college texts, including The Negro in Literature and Art in the United States (1918) and New Survey of English Literature (1925).

Born in 1882 in Columbia, South Carolina, Brawley was the second son of Edward McKnight Brawley and Margaret Dickerson Brawley. He studied at Atlanta Baptist College (renamed Morehouse College), graduating in 1901, earned his second BA in 1906 from the University of Chicago, and received his Master's degree from Harvard University in 1908.Brawley taught in the English departments at Atlanta Baptist College, Howard University, and Shaw University.

Full Wikipedia entry and list of publications here -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Griffith_Brawley

Books by Brawley, Benjamin Griffith
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/4226

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Hamilton

An unorthodox musical with a diverse cast about the life of Alexander Hamilton is creating waves on Broadway and beyond while it smashes box office records. Charlie Rose reports.

Book that inspired the playwright - http://amzn.to/20IzmuP
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The Man Who Changed Reading Forever

Aldus challenged received doctrine and sometimes pressed the limits of what the powerful Roman Catholic Church would accept. “He was the type who knew the difference between fearing God and fearing the church, and he lived his life on that fine line,” Berra says. “He also knew when to take a step back and reflect on what was important to his goals.” He printed most of the Greek canon for the first time and made secular literature portable, but he also printed important letters of the early church fathers; in 1518, his heirs printed the first edition of the Greek Bible.

From The Man Who Changed Reading Forever | Travel | Smithsonian

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Furs, Mounts, and Skulls at ARLIS, continued

Following an initial story and slideshow in the Alaska Dispatch News, the Furs, Mounts, and Skulls Collection at ARLIS continued to attract media attention.

NPR's morning edition interviewed ARLIS Librarian Celia Rozen. A recording and transcript of the interview is available at http://www.npr.org/2015/10/07/446499508/check-out-what-you-can-borrow-fr...

30 Years of NEH Preservation Grants | LYRASIS NOW

The year was 1985, Marty McFly and Professor Brown made history by going Back to the Future. Little did we know we were about to make history as we were just embarking on a new program, Preservation Field Services. Now here we are, 30 years later, thanking the National Endowment for the Humanities who has allowed us to continue serving and aiding the preservation of collections across the country.

It all began in January 1985, when the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), granted LYRASIS $168,401 to establish Preservation Field Services. The mission of Preservation Field Services was to strengthen local institutions’ ability to preserve their collections. This was done through consulting, training and providing resources of information pertaining to collection care and preservation.

From 30 Years of NEH Preservation Grants | LYRASIS NOW

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'Fair Use in the US Economy' (2010)

PDF of a report from 2010:

This report employs the latest data available to answer a very important
question: what contribution is made to our economy by industries that
depend on the limitations to copyright protection when engaged in
commerce? As this report shows, such industries make a huge contribution.
In an era of highly competitive markets for information goods and
services, changes to the boundaries of copyright protection will alter
the economic landscape. Broader regulation of economic activity by
copyright might encourage additional creativity, but it will deter certain
types of technology innovation, and may undermine competition and
free expression. Our information policy must therefore balance the
incentives that IP regulation creates against the disincentives that
result. For 300 years, copyright law has recognized this fragile balance.

From Wired.com PDF [PDF]

Release of the Full TPP Text After Five Years of Secrecy Confirms Threats to Users’ Rights

Now that we finally have the final text of this agreement, we'll be digging deeper into the implications of this sprawling agreement in the days and weeks to come. However, if there's one thing we can take away from this, it's that the TPP's secretive, lobbyist-controlled policymaking process has led to a deal that upholds corporate rights and interests at the direct expense of all of our digital rights. We’re going to do all we can to ensure this agreement never gets ratified by the United States Congress or any other country that is a party to this deal. To do so, government officials need to hear from us loud and clear that we won’t stand by and let them trade away our rights to powerful multinational corporations.

From Release of the Full TPP Text After Five Years of Secrecy Confirms Threats to Users’ Rights | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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A digital portrait of Colonial life

Launched Monday, the website of the Colonial North American Project so far includes 150,000 images of diaries, journals, notebooks, and other rare documents from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Part of the University’s endeavor to digitize all its collections and make them available free of charge, the Colonial North American Project is unique because of its scale. According to a 2011 survey, the material is scattered through 12 repositories — from Houghton Library to the Harvard University Archives to Loeb Music Library.

From A digital portrait of Colonial life | Harvard Gazette

My 2.5 Star Trip to Amazon's Bizarre New Bookstore

The staff are drawn from within Amazon, from local bookstores, from libraries. Robert Sindelar of Third Place has said that some of his staff were contacted by Amazon recruiters through LinkedIn. Pam Cady, manager of the general books department at University Book Store was contacted as well. Cady received LinkedIn messages and an email. It was very personal in tone, but ended with a simple choice: a button to indicate whether or not she was interested in the offer. “I clicked not interested.”

From My 2.5 Star Trip to Amazon's Bizarre New Bookstore | The New Republic

A methodology for identifying library peers

Using IMLS 2013 data Levi Bowles, data science professional, applied a "nearest neighbor" methodology to find peer libraries for an example library system. The nearest neighbor method is widely used across many fields. The factors matched on were population served, branches, funding per capita, visits per population.

For the full post visit http://www.datasciencenotes.com/2015/10/peer-group-determination-library....

The Book Is Better Than The Movie 96 Percent Of The Time

Literary lovers everywhere, today is your day: You were right, the book is almost always better than the movie!

Vocativ analyzed Goodreads and IMDb ratings from 800 books and their movie adaptations ranging from “Harry Potter” to “Hannibal” and discovered that the book had a higher rating 96 percent of the time. In fact, books are considered “much better” than their movie adaptations in 51.8 percent of cases.

From The Book Is Better Than The Movie 96 Percent Of The Time

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Latest Hotel Amenity: Books

These libraries help guests make a meaningful connection with their hotel, said Bobby Zur, who owns Travel Artistry, a consultancy in Franklin Lakes, N.J.

“Books in your room are a counterrevolution to technology overload and are almost comforting for guests,” he said. “They also give the properties a unique identity.”

From Latest Hotel Amenity: Books - The New York Times

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The Samuelson Clinic releases "Is it in the Public Domain?" handbook - Berkeley Law

The Samuelson Clinic is excited to provide a
handbook, “Is it in the Public Domain?,” and accompanying
visuals. These educational tools help users to evaluate the
copyright status of a work created in the United States between
January 1, 1923 and December 31, 1977—those works that were
created before today’s 1976 Copyright Act. Many important
works—from archival materials to family photos and movies—were created during this time, and it can be
difficult to tell whether they are still under copyright.

The handbook walks readers though a series of
questions—illustrated by accompanying charts—to help readers
explore whether a copyrighted work from that time is in the
public domain, and therefore free to be used without
permission from a copyright owner.  Knowing whether a work
is in the public domain or protected by copyright is an
important first step in any decision regarding whether or
how to make use of a work.

From The Samuelson Clinic releases "Is it in the Public Domain?" handbook - Berkeley Law

Novelist warns Stanford audience against utilitarian trends in higher education

In the 2015 Presidential Lecture in the Arts and Humanities, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Marilynne Robinson argued that if the American higher education system continues to shift priorities towards training instead of educating, students will be ill-equipped to participate as citizens of a democratic society.

From Novelist warns Stanford audience against utilitarian trends in higher education

Library Workflow Exchange

<a href="http://www.libraryworkflowexchange.org/">Library Workflow Exchange</a> is a new site designed to help librarians find sample workflows, tools, and procedures. It currently focuses on workflows for cataloging, description, and metadata creation. If you have workflows or documentation that you think a wider audience would benefit from, please share them!

"Interesting" Patron Questions

The reference desk of a library is truly one of the most interesting of places. Through an October poll in Crossroads, we asked WebJunction members to share the most interesting patron questions they had received, and the response was amazing! While there are definitely many humorous submissions, we also know that every day, library staff answer patron questions that help them in so many ways. From completing homework to applications for college, to supporting job-seekers and those looking to better understand nutrition or a disease - libraries help people find the information that they need to live informed and productive lives. And some days, it's just really entertaining.

From Interesting Patron Questions

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LAM Education Needs Assessments: Bridging the Gaps

LAM Education Needs Assessments: Bridging the Gaps

Authored by Christina Drummond, Tom Clareson, Laurie Arp Gemmil, and Katherine Skinner, this publication aims to introduce guiding principles and practices for CE/PD needs assessments from beyond the LAM sphere of reference. A literature review section highlights needs assessment research from other fields (e.g., higher education, nonprofit training, etc.), drawing attention to models that could inform LAM practice. Existing LAM CE/PD needs assessment efforts are then contextualized against these models to inform future cross-sector CE/PD collaborations.

From Mapping the Landscapes | Educopia

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