When The News Reads You Back: Why Journalists Need to Stand Up for Reader Privacy

The Ethics of Reader Privacy
This isn’t just a business issue, it is an ethical issue about how we relate to the communities we serve. And for readers, it’s much more than just an issue of agreeing to view ads, knowing that ads allow them to view free content. Libert and Pickard agree, writing that publishers have to “consider the ethics of tracking users and their outsize role in widely reviled annoyances such as increasing page load times, invading privacy, sucking up data on limited plans and imposing distracting animations and sounds on the viewer.”

From When The News Reads You Back: Why Journalists Need to Stand Up for Reader Privacy — Thoughts on Media — Medium

The Glacial Pace of Scientific Publishing: Why It Hurts Everyone and What We Can Do To Fix It

In fact, the situation with extreme delays in scientific publication is likely to be even worse than it appears from this informal and nonscientific survey. It is common practice at many journals to discard the date of initial submission and reset the submission counter to the final submission prior to a positive decision. Add to this the reality that many manuscripts are subjected to serial submission, rejection, and resubmission at multiple journals. This means that years not months can elapse between the initial submission at the first journal until the ultimate publication of the same paper at the final journal that accepts and publishes the work.

From The Glacial Pace of Scientific Publishing: Why It Hurts Everyone and What We Can Do To Fix It

A Real Page-Turner: Libraries Battle For Book-Sorting Championship

Once a year for the past five years, the New York and Brooklyn Public Libraries have faced off against Washington’s King County Library in a battle of the mechanical book sorters. In the most recent hour-long sorting smackdown, King County reclaimed the world title.

From A Real Page-Turner: Libraries Battle For Book-Sorting Championship | Only A Game

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How to hijack a journal

Even by the standards of Internet scams, the scheme is brazen. According to a tip sent to Science, fraudsters are snatching entire Web addresses, known as Internet domains, right out from under academic publishers, erecting fake versions of their sites, and hijacking their journals, along with their Web traffic.

From Feature: How to hijack a journal | Science/AAAS | News

How Accurate Is The Old Farmer's Almanac?

Timeless, and still meticulously concerned with the particularities of time’s passages—including the positions of planets and other celestial bodies, the movement of the tides, and, of course, the weather. The Old Farmer’s Almanac is famous for its long-term forecasting. And this reputation has remained intact, even as the cultural space weather occupies, and the technology used to track the weather, has dramatically changed.

From How Accurate Is The Old Farmer's Almanac? - The Atlantic

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The Internet Is a Series of Lead Tubes

“Maybe people will look back on what we think is the really important part of the internet, all the memey stuff and the social networks and the places where people are making all this money, and they will look back on it the way we look back on the use of lead plumbing on the part of the aristocracy in ancient Rome. Which, to them this was like ‘Oh my god this is the sign you’ve arrived, this is where the action is, we have plumbing and it’s awesome!’ And it was! It was this amazing technological infrastructure. It was beautifully made, it provided them with an incredibly high standard of living and it also slowly, gradually made them irretrievably sick and insane*. It poisoned them day by day.

From The Last Word On Nothing | The Internet Is a Series of Lead Tubes

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The Wayback Machine Is Getting a Search Engine

The Wayback Machine is knowledge storage on a colossal scale: maintained by the Internet Archive, it’s a repository of how everything looked on the internet in the past. But the biggest libraries are the hardest to organize, which is why $2 million is being spent to give the Wayback Machine its very own Google.

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation announced yesterday that it’s donating $1.9 million to develop a search engine for the Wayback Machine. Why should you care?

From The Wayback Machine Is Getting a Search Engine

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ATTENTION: Library Toilet Paper Thieves, You've Been Warned

"Stealing is punishable by the law," the sign reads. "If you are caught stealing the bathroom tissue from dispenser, you will be barred permanently from all New York Public Libraries."

From ATTENTION: Library Toilet Paper Thieves, You've Been Warned - Morrisania - DNAinfo.com New York

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library data and technology | libraries hacked

library data and technology
analysing and promoting open source technology hacks and projects in libraries.

From library data and technology | libraries hacked

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Elsevier stopped me doing my research

Full disclosure, I downloaded approximately 30GB of data from Sciencedirect in approximately 10 days. This boils down to a server load of 35KB/s, 0.0021GB/min, 0.125GB/h, 3GB/day.

Approximately two weeks after I started downloading psychology research papers, Elsevier notified my university that this was a violation of the access contract, that this could be considered stealing of content, and that they wanted it to stop. My librarian explicitly instructed me to stop downloading (which I did immediately), otherwise Elsevier would cut all access to Sciencedirect for my university.

From Chris H.J. Hartgerink's Notebook

The 10 best books of 2015 - Washington Post

In our annual roundup of best books, you’ll find 10 that we think are exceptionally rewarding and 100 more you shouldn’t miss. In addition to our usual recommendations for lovers of mysteries, graphic novels and audiobooks, we’ve added lists drawn from our new monthly columns in romance, poetry and science fiction and fantasy.

From The 10 best books of 2015 - Washington Post

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See Old Library Books Come to Life in Kerry Mansfield’s Expired Series

Her Site: http://www.kerrymansfield.com/Artist.asp?ArtistID=40025&Akey=J83G789M

Mansfield was inspired to start her project after spotting an old library checkout card inside a book she found at Goodwill, which made her nostalgic for the experience of libraries before books and card catalogues were digitized. She then spent more than two years collecting at least 160 former library books she found through nonprofits, eBay, libraries, garage sales and even individual submissions. They are all “books that have lived in at least one public library, often many more,” she said. “Once they are too abused or out of date they’re written off as ‘withdrawn’, ‘removed’, ‘expired’, and taken out of circulation…. The unlucky ones get recycled back into pulp.”

From See Old Library Books Come to Life in Kerry Mansfield’s Expired Series | TIME

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The 20 Most Extreme Cases Of ‘The Book Was Better Than The Movie’

Because there are extreme cases where book-lover rage is justifiable. Which cases? I pulled the Metacritic critic ratings of the top 500 movies on IMDb tagged with the “based on novel” keyword.1 I then2 found the average user rating of the source novel for each film on Goodreads, a book rating and review site.3 In the end, there was complete data for 382 films and source novels.

Here’s what each film’s Metacritic rating looks like plotted against its source material’s Goodreads rating

From The 20 Most Extreme Cases Of ‘The Book Was Better Than The Movie’ | FiveThirtyEight

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Elsevier leads the business the internet could not kill

“Elsevier is not a stodgy, stuck-in-the-mud publisher,” she says. “ They are out there experimenting because they have the resources to do that.”
In the 20 years since Forbes predicted Elsevier’s downfall, the publisher’s revenues and profits have quadrupled. Academics might not like it, but the 135-year old publisher shows no signs of going away.

From Elsevier leads the business the internet could not kill - FT.com

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Researchers study motivations of open-source programmers

It seems illogical for software developers to give away their skills and efforts from an economic point of view. The authors hypothesized that a different set of motivations was required for the successful development of such a large software environment. They sent surveys to about 4,300 software package developers, and ultimately received around 764 responses.
Analyzing the collected data, the authors concluded that hybrid motivations and social characteristics were broadly responsible for the success of the R project. Hybrid motivations refer to both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations; among R project developers, purely intrinsic motivations like personal satisfaction and purely extrinsic motivations like receiving compensation were found to be less important.

From Researchers study motivations of open-source programmers

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Open paren is a podcast about libraries, librarians, and code.

About Open Paren

Open paren is a podcast about libraries, librarians, and code.

Whether you’re just setting out to learn to code, or architecting systems in widespread use, I want to have conversations that matter to you. Let’s talk about what you do and why: how code you write makes things better for you and your patrons; your biggest successes and most interesting mistakes; where your projects have been and where they’re going; social issues that feed into, and spring out of, library software.

From About ( Open paren

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Bad sex award 2015: the contenders in quotes

Eight purple passages are up for the prize every author dreads, the annual Literary Review Bad Sex in Fiction award. Can Erica Jong beat Morrissey to the sweetspot?

From Bad sex award 2015: the contenders in quotes | Books | The Guardian

It's elementary: Classrooms need libraries

Yesterday, Mayor-elect Jim Kenney, Superintendent William Hite and 30 other leaders gathered at Clara Barton Elementary to launch a $3.5 million fundraising campaign aimed at placing libraries in every Philadelphia School District elementary classroom.

The need is great, especially in a system where few whole-school libraries remain, and fewer than a dozen librarians remain on staff citywide.

From It's elementary: Classrooms need libraries

Know Your Online Privacy

The what and why of this report should be quite clear: we are leaving massive footprints on the internet and have little knowledge of how it’s used. Ranking Digital Rights has made the full data available for download, including researchers’ comments and responses from the corporations where available. We were pleased to partner with Ranking Digital Rights and Beekeeper Group to develop a set of web tools to communicate and explore the data.

The Guardian have put together some extensive coverage of the report. It’s worth a read. Also worth a shout-out is the Mapbox privacy statement, which we think should be a model.

From Know Your Online Privacy — Development Seed

How I’m exporting my highlights from the grasps of iBooks and Kindle

So after stewing in frustration for quite awhile about the current state of digital reading platforms, I decided to do what any sane programmer would do: Devise an overly complex solution on AWS for a seemingly simple problem (that two companies with a combined market cap of close to a trillion fucking dollars can’t be bothered to solve).
The ultimate product was highlights.sawyerhollenshead.com.

From How I’m exporting my highlights from the grasps of iBooks and Kindle. — Medium

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