Doris Lessing's Books to Go to Zimbabwe Libraries

From ABC News:

Nobel Prize-winning novelist Doris Lessing, who died last year, spent her early years in Zimbabwe. She is still giving back to the country whose former white rulers banished her for speaking against racial discrimination.

The bulk of Lessing's book collection was handed over to the Harare City Library (at the corner of Rotten Row and Pennyfeather), which will catalogue the more than 3,000 books. The donation complements the author's role in opening libraries in Zimbabwe, to make books available to rural people.

"For us she continues to live," said 42-year-old Kempson Mudenda, who worked with Lessing when she established the Africa Community Publishing and Development Trust.

"The libraries she helped set up are giving life to village children who would otherwise be doomed," said Mudenda, who said he used to trudge bush paths daily to reach remote villages with books.

Lessing's trust started libraries in thatched mud huts and under trees after the author was allowed to return to Zimbabwe following independence in 1980.

Strategic, timely censorship

In September of last year, Chinese authorities announced an unorthodox standard to help them decide whether to punish people for posting online comments that are false, defamatory, or otherwise harmful: Was a message popular enough to attract five hundred reposts or five thousand views? It was a striking example of how sophisticated the Chinese government has become, in recent years, in restricting Internet communication—going well beyond crude measures like restricting access to particular Web sites or censoring online comments that use certain keywords. Madeline Earp, a research analyst at Freedom House, the Washington-based nongovernmental organization, suggested a phrase to describe the approach: “strategic, timely censorship.” She told me, “It’s about allowing a surprising amount of open discussion, as long as you’re not the kind of person who can really use that discussion to organize people.”

Full article - The World Cracks Down on the Internet

Topic: 

Integrating Libraries and Bookstores: In Theory

Post at Publishing Perspectives.

A theoretical plan for saving bookstores and making libraries more robust.

Full piece here:
http://publishingperspectives.com/2014/12/deborah-emin-integrating-libraries-bookstores-theory/

Topic: 

Tis the Season

Happy, uh Holidays? Story via <a href="http://boston.cbslocal.com/2014/12/05/boston-woman-on-mission-to-get-menorah-at-public-library/">CBS Boston</a>.

Rent a Car @ Your Library

Are you a card carrying member? Then you can do more than just borrow books at three branches of the Brooklyn Public Library, you can borrow a car.

As a BPL member, you can join Zipcar now and get $25 in free driving.

We bow to the inventors of this whole sharing thing. The library. They got it way before the rest of us. Borrow it. Use it. Return it. Then it’s someone else’s turn. Genius.

You don’t need that book collecting dust on the shelf. So you let someone else use it. You don’t need a car in Brooklyn all the time, so why pay for it all time? With Zipcar, you share cars with the folks in your neighborhood. You reserve it when you need it and put it back when you’re done.

It’s easy. Just join, reserve, unlock and drive! (Gas & insurance are included)

Unique gift inscription in book

A blog post about a very unique gift inscription in a book.

Topic: 

Ferguson Municipal Public Library Tour



Welcome to the Ferguson Municipal Public Library, NOW with SUPER SHAKY CAM (TM). This tour will show you around the public areas of the library. A simple video introduction, and a big welcome to every single human being in the city of Ferguson, Missouri!

Topic: 

Duluth library's seed sharing program hits a hurdle

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture has given a thumbs down to a Duluth seed-sharing program that allows members to borrow vegetable seeds from the library in the spring and later return seeds they collect from their gardens.

State agriculture regulators say the exchange — one of about 300 in the United States — violates the state's seed law because it does not test seeds.

That could jeopardize the popular program, which attracted 200 members who borrowed 800 packets of seeds in its first year, manager Carla Powers said.

In September, the library got a surprise visit from a Minnesota Department of Agriculture seed inspector. He informed the library it was likely violating Minnesota's seed law, which regulates the selling of seeds.

Full article:
http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/11/30/duluth-librarys-seed-sharing-program-hits-a-hurdle

Topic: 

Burn the Libraries and Free the Librarians

Topic: 

Cites & Insights 15:1 (January 2015) available

Cites & Insights 15:1 (January 2015) available
http://lisnews.org/cites_insights_151_january_2015_available

Topic: 

The Off-Site Librarian | One Cool Thing

When one of the bookmobiles at the Fort Vancouver Regional Library (FVRL), WA, wore out, spending a quarter of a million dollars to buy a new one was not an option. Yet patrons in remote, rural locations in Clark County still needed library service. The innovative solution was the Yacolt Library Express (YLE): a building that is open to the public nearly 70 hours a week, yet staff only spend about ten hours there during the same period.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/11/opinion/one-cool-thing/the-off-site-librarian-one-cool-...

Topic: 

Ohh great - MIT builds the mechanical hound from Fahrenheit 451


It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles.

The robot, called the cheetah, can run on batteries at speeds of more than 10 mph, jump about 16 inches high, land safely and continue galloping for at least 15 minutes — all while using less power than a microwave oven.

Full article:
http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/technology/mit-engineers-have-high-hopes-for-cheetah-robot/ar...

Topic: 

A Little Boring is Sometimes a Good Thing

Annoyed Librarian comments on the news story that the library in Ferguson was open during the protests and that it has been receiving donations.

Although it has "boring" in the title the post is a good read:
http://lj.libraryjournal.com/blogs/annoyedlibrarian/2014/12/01/a-little-boring-is-sometimes-...

Topic: 

Kent Haruf, Author Of Moving, Colorado-Set Novels, Dies At 71

Novelist Kent Haruf chased writing in his youth, but it wasn't until he was 40 that he'd developed his skills enough to be published. He's best known for National Book Award finalist "Plainsong."

Two minute audio story at NPR:
http://www.npr.org/2014/12/02/367938648/kent-haruf-author-of-moving-colorado-set-novels-dies...

Topic: 

Watch Your Head When Checking Out Murakami's Strange 'Library'

As if the work of Japanese fiction master Haruki Murakami weren't strangely beautiful by itself, his American publisher has just put out a stand-alone edition of his 2008 novella The Strange Library, in a new trade paperback designed by the legendary Chip Kidd.

"The library was even more hushed than usual," we read in the opening sentence (the entire book is set in a typeface called, appropriately, Typewriter), calling attention to the fact that we're in for a special event. Murakami sets his story — newly translated from the Japanese by Ted Goossen — in a realm of words, an unnamed city library. An inquiring schoolboy stops by on the way home from class returns some library books (How to Build a Submarine and Memoirs of a Shepherd) and asks for reading on a subject he says has just popped into his head: Tax Collection in the Ottoman Empire.

An unfamiliar female librarian sends him down to room 107, "a creepy room" where yet another strange librarian (a bald man this time) hands him the requested volumes — then conducts him to a secret space, behind a locked door and down a hall to a labyrinth of corridors where a small man dressed in a sheepskin puts him in a cell under lock and key.

A very strange library indeed!

Full piece here:
http://www.npr.org/2014/12/02/363836249/watch-your-head-when-checking-out-murakamis-strange-...

Topic: 

Not Nearly Enough School Librarians in Philadelphia

In 1991, there were 176 certified librarians in Philadelphia public schools. This year there are 11 and only five are known to be actually doing what they were trained to do. Five librarians for the nation's eighth-largest school district.

Leaving Philadelphia's public school libraries without professional staffing is a grave mistake. It will have consequences for the students for the rest of their lives. Study after study shows a clear link between school libraries staffed by certified librarians and student achievement.

Read more in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Self-Published Winners @ the Library

Annoyed Librarian -- Whenever I write about self-published authors, the comment section seems to erupt into a melee between self-published authors talking about how great self-published works are and librarians talking about how awful they are. One solution to the problem would be for the ALA to create an award for self-published books to go along with popular awards like the Newbery Award and all the other awards I can’t remember right now. Then the librarians in the trenches would know what books to buy and wouldn't have to read any of them.

Full piece:
http://lj.libraryjournal.com/blogs/annoyedlibrarian/

Topic: 

A Nationwide Outpouring Of Support For Tiny Ferguson Library

British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94

British mystery and crime novelist P.D. James, whose best-known works featured poet and Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh as a protagonist, has died at age 94, her publisher says.

Phyllis Dorothy James, a baroness and award-winning writer of such books as Shroud for a Nightingale, The Black Tower and The Murder Room, was born in Oxford began writing in her late 30s and published her first novel, Cover Her Face, in 1962.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/11/27/366997584/british-mystery-novelist-p-d-james-...

Topic: 

Omaha Public Library director has submitted resignation

Omaha Public Library director Gary Wasdin has officially accepted a library director position with King County Library System. His last day with OPL will be Jan. 16.

http://www.ketv.com/news/omaha-public-library-director-has-submitted-resignation/29946614

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS