Author Beverly Cleary turns 100 with wit, candour

As she turns 100, the feisty and witty author Beverly Cleary remembers the Oregon childhood that inspired the likes of characters Ramona and Beezus Quimby and Henry Huggins in the children's books that sold millions and enthralled generations of youngsters. "I was a well-behaved little girl, not that I wanted to be," she said. "At the age of Ramona, in those days, children played outside. We played hopscotch and jump rope and I loved them and always had scraped knees."
From Author Beverly Cleary turns 100 with wit, candour | Entertainment & Showbiz from CTV News
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National Library Week – thoughts on cybersecurity

There are two ways in which libraries could be doing a lot better in the realm of cybersecurity. And I should note, I work for rural libraries and digitally divided patrons for the most part so a lot of my ideas are on human scale but there are a lot of good ideas in the larger scale about just encrypting and anonymizing data but they’re sort of the same as they would be for any big business.
From National Library Week – thoughts on cybersecurity | librarian.net

The importance of teaching online privacy at the college

I really like the closing paragraph here! I might replace "The College" with "The College Library" :-) http://flathatnews.com/2016/04/04/the-importance-of-teaching-online-privacy-at-the-college/
If the College’s mission truly is to mold us into informed citizens and consumers, an excellent place for it to start would be with this issue of data security and online privacy. Even a brief session during orientation would be an improvement; if not to teach us how to be fully secure in our data, then simply to let us know that it is not, by itself, fully secure. An even better option, as suggested by Tracy Mitrano — an academic dean at the University of Massachusetts Cybersecurity Certificate Programs — would be a GER course in information literacy. Only then could the College say it produces truly informed citizens.
From The importance of teaching online privacy at the college | Flat Hat News

Getting away with murder: literature's most annoyingly unpunished characters

Nobody wants to see the baddie win, however much sense it makes to the story. Which of the villains in books do you wish retribution on?
From Getting away with murder: literature's most annoyingly unpunished characters | Books | The Guardian
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Americans, Libraries and Learning: New Pew Research Center Report!

Libraries and Learning Majorities of Americans think local libraries serve the educational needs of their communities and families pretty well and library users often outpace others in learning activities. But many do not know about key education services libraries provide
From Americans, Libraries and Learning | Pew Research Center

Harry Potter: GCHQ 'intervened over Half-Blood Prince leak'

Bloomsbury's Nigel Newton said GCHQ contacted him in 2005 after it apparently discovered an early copy of The Half Blood-Prince on the internet. However, after a page was read to an editor, it was determined to be fake. A spokesperson for GCHQ told the Sunday Times: "We don't comment on our defence against the dark arts."
From Harry Potter: GCHQ 'intervened over Half-Blood Prince leak' - BBC News
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The Internet Archive, ALA, and SAA Brief Filed in TV News Fair Use Case

The Internet Archive, joined by the American Library Association, the Association of College and Research Libraries, the Association of Research Libraries, and the Society of American Archivists filed an amicus brief in Fox v. TVEyes on March 23, 2016. In the brief, the Internet Archive and its partners urge the court to issue a decision that will support rather than hinder the development of comprehensive archives of television broadcasts.
From The Internet Archive, ALA, and SAA Brief Filed in TV News Fair Use Case | Internet Archive Blogs

The crazy scale of the US’s benefactor-driven museum boom

Museums in the US are growing rapidly—and so is the money at stake. They spent nearly $5 billion between 2007 and 2014, according to the Art Newspaper. The publication’s study of 75 museums across 38 countries found that, when it came to building new wings and galleries, the US spent more than all the 37 other countries combined. The boom is all the more spectacular as it came amid the worst recession since the Great Depression.
From The crazy scale of the US’s benefactor-driven museum boom - Quartz
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How Shakespeare Lives Now

Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1616, went largely unremarked by all but a few of his immediate contemporaries. There was no global shudder when his mortal remains were laid to rest in Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. No one proposed that he be interred in Westminster Abbey near Chaucer or Spenser (where his fellow playwright Francis Beaumont was buried in the same year and where Ben Jonson would be buried some years later). No notice of Shakespeare’s passing was taken in the diplomatic correspondence of the time or in the newsletters that circulated on the Continent; no rush of Latin obsequies lamented the “vanishing of his breath,” as classical elegies would have it; no tributes were paid to his genius by his distinguished European contemporaries. Shakespeare’s passing was an entirely local English event, and even locally it seems scarcely to have been noted.
From How Shakespeare Lives Now by Stephen Greenblatt | The New York Review of Books
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Librarian under house arrest in Moscow accused of anti-Russian propaganda

She's accused of inciting ethnic hatred and violating human dignity. Natalya Sharina is a 58-year-old Russian librarian in Moscow  and though the Russian government says she's not on the Kremlin's radar, someone thinks she and her books are a threat.
From Librarian under house arrest in Moscow accused of anti-Russian propaganda - Home | The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti | CBC Radio
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How much is a library worth?

It is doubtful, however, that that is why those behind Americans for Prosperity want to close our libraries. More likely possibilities include the privatization of our library system, resulting in even more public funding finding its way into the pockets of the already wealthy. Or perhaps they just want to slash one more public benefit to increase the taxpayer-funded corporate welfare programs without running into budget deficits. Regardless of the reasoning, the people most hurt by libraries closing will, as usual, be those who can least afford it. Almost half of all surveyed by Pew indicated that libraries help people find jobs. But when you look at those in households with incomes of less than $30,000, that percentage increases to 53 percent.  Among African Americans it’s 55 percent, and among Latinos it is 58 percent. 
From How much is a library worth?
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With Romance Novels Booming, Beefcake Sells, but It Doesn’t Pay

How hot are romance novels? Over all, annual sales totaled $1.08 billion in 2013, according to the Romance Writers of America, which tracks sales. And their popularity is expected to grow. Last year Scribd, an e-book subscription service, sharply reduced the number of romance and erotica novels it offered because it couldn’t afford to keep up with readers’ appetites. (Scribd pays publishers every time a book is read and loses money if a book is too popular.) Despite the perception that blockbusters like “Fifty Shades of Grey” drive sales, self-publishing has proved a boon for this particular genre. E-books make up nearly 40 percent of all purchases, according to the writers group. And there are categories for every reader’s taste, among them, adventure, Christian, multicultural, L.G.B.T. and paranormal.
From With Romance Novels Booming, Beefcake Sells, but It Doesn’t Pay - The New York Times
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White House wants more sharable, reusable code

The White House is looking to make software code used by the federal agencies more open, sharable and reusable. In a March 10 blog post, federal CIO Tony Scott announced a new draft Federal Source Code policy that would create a new set of rules for custom code developed by or for the federal government. Once the new policy takes effect, software developed at agencies or created by contractors specifically for government use will be available to share and reuse across agencies.
From White House wants more sharable, reusable code -- FCW
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A spiritual successor to Aaron Swartz is angering publishers all over again

But suddenly in 2016, the tale has new life. The Washington Post decries it as academic research's Napster moment, and it all stems from a 27-year-old bioengineer turned Web programmer from Kazakhstan (who's living in Russia). Just as Swartz did, this hacker is freeing tens of millions of research articles from paywalls, metaphorically hoisting a middle finger to the academic publishing industry, which, by the way, has again reacted with labels like "hacker" and "criminal." Meet Alexandra Elbakyan, the developer of Sci-Hub, a Pirate Bay-like site for the science nerd. It's a portal that offers free and searchable access "to most publishers, especially well-known ones." Search for it, download, and you're done. It's that easy. "The more known the publisher is, the more likely Sci-Hub will work," she told Ars via e-mail. A message to her site's users says it all: "SCI-HUB...to remove all barriers in the way of science."
From A spiritual successor to Aaron Swartz is angering publishers all over again | Ars Technica

Inside the most incredible libraries in Britain

Worth writing home about: Inside the most incredible libraries in Britain, from Oxford's historic reading rooms to a futuristic wonder in Liverpool The existence of many libraries is under threat and nearly 350 libraries closed in Britain over the past six years Thankfully there are still plenty of breathtaking libraries to explore from historic rooms to modern glass buildings Oxford's Codrington Library has spectacular white marble statues that contrast with its rows of dark bookcases
From Inside the most incredible libraries in Britain | Daily Mail Online
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How to Make Psychology Studies More Reliable

There’s another way, says Eric Luis Uhlmann from INSEAD: Get your own studies independently replicated before they are published. He is leading by example. In August 2014, he asked 25 independent teams to repeat all of his group’s unpublished experiments, before he submitted them to academic journals.
From How to Make Psychology Studies More Reliable - The Atlantic

Library Offers Homeless People Mental Health Services, And It's Working

Libraries have long served as havens for homeless people. But it’s only recently that these institutions have started taking advantage of their unique position. Those who live in shelters typically have to vacate during daytime hours and use their free time to find jobs. And libraries are an optimal place to go since admittance is free and it’s often the only spot in town that has gratis Internet and computers. In fact, nearly two-thirds of libraries provide the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, the Associated Press reported last year. 
From Library Offers Homeless People Mental Health Services, And It's Working
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Meet the man who is turning D.C. libraries into a national model

But Reyes-Gavilan’s ambitions go beyond bricks and mortar. He wants to put the D.C. Public Library at the forefront of American libraries, to be a model for the nation by embracing a “hacker” culture that treats library patrons not as passive consumers of information, but as creators. His mantra is “libraries are not their buildings,” but “engines of human capital.”
From Meet the man who is turning D.C. libraries into a national model - The Washington Post

Proposed Alaska state budget cuts zero out funding for library internet

“It’s taken off, and people are just starting to see the many opportunities that it brings us,” Julene Brown says. “It’s just kind of ironic to see these state agencies that are trying to figure out how to deliver services with the budget cuts that they’re face. This video conferencing is one way they’re able to do that.” Back in Haines, Miles Curtis says with the world becoming increasingly paperless, access to the web is no longer just a privilege. “It’s gotten to a point where I would consider it a right,” he says. “Everything is going in the direction where it would be difficult to function, and have access to the information that everyone should be entitled to.”
From KHNS Radio | KHNS FM » Proposed state budget cuts zero out funding for library internet
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In San Jose, Poor Find Doors to Library Closed Because Of Late Fines

Alexander is more careful than most.Half of the current cardholders at the Biblioteca branch owe money, and most — 65 percent — are barred from borrowing materials and using computers because they owe $10 or more. San Jose’s charges are exponentially higher than comparable cities like San Francisco, where there is no charge for late materials for users 17 and younger and a charge of 10 cents a day for adults. “Fifty cents a day for middle-class families is a slap on the wrist,” said Maria Arias Evans, the principal of Washington Elementary School in San Jose, which is behind the Biblioteca Latinoamericana. Given the choice between paying fines “and putting food on the table and a roof over the children’s head, it’s a no-brainer: It is better not to check out library books.”
From In San Jose, Poor Find Doors to Library Closed - The New York Times

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