How UNH Turned A Quiet Benefactor Into A Football-Marketing Prop

That’s where most people left Robert Morin. A second, smaller wave of coverage focused on UNH’s troubling decision to funnel only $100,000 of his money to the library, even as it committed $1 million of it to a video scoreboard for its football stadium. But the full story is more troubling still. Through a series of interviews and public records requests, Deadspin has uncovered the 17-month backstory to Morin’s bequest. Like so many schools, big and small, UNH spent wildly on its athletic department. The university went a step further in trying to engineer a public relations victory, deceptively connecting a fragment of Morin’s life to its football splurge. The media eagerly repackaged the story as an inspirational fable.
From How UNH Turned A Quiet Benefactor Into A Football-Marketing Prop
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Napoleon's Kindle: See the Miniaturized Traveling Library He Took on Military Campaigns

"Many of Napoleon’s biographers have incidentally mentioned that he […] used to carry about a certain number of favorite books wherever he went, whether traveling or camping," says an 1885 Sacramento Daily Union article posted by Austin Kleon, "but it is not generally known that he made several plans for the construction of portable libraries which were to form part of his baggage." The piece's main source, a Louvre librarian who grew up as the son of one of Napoleon's librarians, recalls from his father's stories that "for a long time Napoleon used to carry about the books he required in several boxes holding about sixty volumes each," each box first made of mahogany and later of more solid leather-covered oak. "The inside was lined with green leather or velvet, and the books were bound in morocco," an even softer leather most often used for bookbinding.
From Napoleon's Kindle: See the Miniaturized Traveling Library He Took on Military Campaigns | Open Culture
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Let's Talk about Books

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Penn Jillette on books

People forget how useful books are.

--Penn Jillette
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Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks



In Dear Fahrenheit 451, librarian Annie Spence has crafted love letters and breakup notes to the iconic and eclectic books she has encountered over the years. From breaking up with The Giving Tree (a dysfunctional relationship book if ever there was one), to her love letter to The Time Traveler’s Wife (a novel less about time travel and more about the life of a marriage, with all of its ups and downs), Spence will make you think of old favorites in a new way. Filled with suggested reading lists, Spence’s take on classic and contemporary books is very much like the best of literature―sometimes laugh-out-loud funny, sometimes surprisingly poignant, and filled with universal truths.

Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks
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AT UCLA, They're Building Maps for Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief

A program has sprung up at UCLA to build maps for hurricane relief.

The mapathon activities were scheduled for today, October 5 at the Young Research Library. Volunteers will help add building locations to maps of the island. These maps will be used by the Red Cross and other relief agencies.

No experience, knowledge of Puerto Rico’s geography or software installation was required. Participants were asked to just bring a laptop and library staff and UCLA’s Institute for Digital Research and Education geographic information systems experts will teach them how to help with these efforts through some easy-to-learn mapping tasks in a web-based application.

Librarian explains why she rejected books donated by Melania Trump

Via CBS News.

The Dr. Suess books were rejected by a librarian at the Cambridgeport Elementray School Library in response to President Trump's selection of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education among other factors. What's your opinion on the rejection of the gift?

UPDATE: FLOTUS office fires back a reply to the rejection of the Dr. Suess books: via FoxNews (what else?)

'To turn the gesture of sending young students some books into something divisive is unfortunate.' - FLOTUS

The Librarian of Auschwitz



Publisher's Weekly Starred Review -- The Librarian of Auschwitz
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Activists: ‘Soul of city’ at stake in Obama library agreement flap

About 300 residents packed a South Side auditorium Wednesday night to demand that the promise of jobs, economic development and other benefits of the Obama presidential library center be put in writing.

The activists and residents want a community benefits agreement, something many say will protect the neighborhoods and people the center may displace.

Full article
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Ex Libris: New York Public Library

Now playing at NYC's Film Forum: Ex Libris NYPL.

Frederick Wiseman cracks open institutions: the military, the insane asylum, the high school, the police, the welfare system, the Paris Opera Ballet, the National Gallery of London, and now – in his 43rd film in 50 years - the New York Public Library, an institution eminently worthy of his immersive style. If you thought libraries are just repositories for books, you’re in for a big, wonderful surprise. The NYPL owns (and makes accessible) millions of images; sponsors lectures by people like Patti Smith, Elvis Costello, and Ta-Nehisi Coates; circulates a growing collection of e-books; maintains a vast archive of materials not available online; and gives classes in digital technology. The magnificent Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (and 5th Avenue at 42nd Street) is the spine of the film, but equally vital is the role of branch libraries that act as community centers for civic life.

18 Great Books You Probably Haven't Read

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What to Do With a Soaking Wet Book

from Syracuse University Library. A lot of paper towels are involved.

FTC's Listening Session for Public Librarians

The Federal Trade Commission wants to hear from you – we’ve worked with libraries for many years to distribute free materials and tips for consumers to help them avoid scams, recover from identity theft, and make wise buys. We’re creating new materials especially for public librarians to use for patron advice and programming.

Please share this invitation with your staff and colleagues. You or they can get on the phone and tell us what you think during our 15-minute listening session.
What consumer topics are the most needed for patrons? (for instance, budgeting/money management, credit and debt; avoiding scams; recovering from identity theft; others?)
What formats work best for your patrons (for instance, bookmarks, brochures, short videos, webinars, podcasts, FB Live, Twitter chats, other social media content, other?)
What formats work best for the librarian as they research the topic for a patron or put together programming (perhaps an online list of links for a deeper dive on certain topics, a brochure, slide presentations, podcasts, other?)

Sept 19 11:00 am PT|2:00 pm ET

To RSVP and get the call-in number, email Carol at [email protected].
Can’t make a session? We would greatly appreciate any thoughts, however brief, you have on this – you can email me at [email protected].

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Books & Reading are More Important Than Ever

Will Schwalbe, author of Books for Living, considers why books and reading are more crucial than ever - and offers up a few ideas for what to read next. Here from Signature Reads are Schwalbe's thoughts on the subject.

He begins thus: "When I can’t stand to look at one more hateful tweet from the president, I read a book."
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Armed Man Shot While Attempting to Enter NC Public Library

WILMINGTON, NC -- A Wilmington, North Carolina, police officer shot a man downtown Thursday afternoon after police received a report of a “subject with a gun.”... According to New Hanover County Sheriff’s Lt. Jerry Brewer, the man being pursued apparently fled through the parking deck. When he attempted to run into the New Hanover County Public Library across Chestnut Street, he was stopped by a sheriff’s deputy who works there. More at <a href="http://www.starnewsonline.com/news/20170907/breaking-wilmington-officer-shoots-armed-man-downtown">Star News</a>

Scientists find languages not used since Dark Ages among ancient manuscripts recovered from monastery

Languages not seen since the Dark Ages have come to light after scientists used a new method to inspect a trove of ancient manuscripts found in a monastery in Egypt. They turned up extremely rare tongues, including Caucasian Albanian, on documents they found in Saint Catherine’s monastery on the Sinai peninsula that date back 1,500 years. Monks originally wrote their texts down on parchments which were later scrubbed off and used to write the Bible by future generations who spoke in more modern languages.
From Scientists find languages not used since Dark Ages among ancient manuscripts recovered from monastery | The Independent
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"Do You Miss Me Yet?" - Reestablishing the Corporate Librarians

It almost never fails when I run into someone I used to work with. The conversation starts with "Hey... how's the law library world? It's gotta be tough with all those books being online now." (The implication being "aren't you worried about becoming irrelevant?") I reply with "Yeah, that makes it a whole lot more difficult to manage with all that information in a dozen different places than it did when it was a book in the library." I'm not sure who they think is managing the information which is usually behind a very expensive paywall. I would guess they either think that it is managed directly by the vendor, or worse, that the Information Technology department is now the de facto library managers.

Full article
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Tolkien's Plant Passion Moves Botanist To Create Guide To Middle Earth

NPR story - Tolkien's Plant Passion Moves Botanist To Create Guide To Middle Earth

When most people read J.R.R. Tolkien, they get swept up in mythical worlds of hobbits and elves, harrowing journeys in fantastical lands and epic battles of good and evil.

But Walter Judd says he got lost in the scenery.

"I started underlining every name of a plant as I was reading The Lord of the Rings," he tells NPR's Morning Edition.

All of the figures in the book — like this nasturtium — are hand-drawn by Graham Judd, who says he used a minimalist woodblock-style to let readers' imaginations bring the illustrations to life.

Moved by Tolkien's passion for plants, the retired botany professor spent years cataloging every plant that appeared in his writing, eventually compiling a list of 141 different species. He teamed up with his son, Graham, a professional illustrator. And together, they embarked on quest to transform that list into a botanical guide to Middle Earth.
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Danvers Mass Library No Chuck E Cheese Tokens Fine Payments

<blockquote>Someone, however, thought it was worth a try. Sue Kontos, the bookkeeper at the Peabody Institute Library of Danvers, wound up tallying three Chuck E. Cheese's tokens and one Bonkers token while counting coins the other day before she realized they weren't real currency. "Somehow, their coins turned up in the rest of the cash," Kontos said.

Clovis Library Shooting: Teen Planned To Shoot Up High School

The father of a troubled 16-year-old boy charged with gunning down two library workers in Clovis, New Mexico said he knew something was amiss when he noticed two handguns were were missing from his home safe.

He reported that information to police, along with the fact that his son — serving a suspension from his high school — was not at home. But by then, the deadly shooting had already happened.

Nathaniel Jouett initially planned to shoot up his high school but went instead to the Clovis-Carver Public Library in the rural community Monday afternoon, according to court documents filed Wednesday.

Full article -- Clovis Library Shooting: Teen Planned To Shoot Up High School
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