Ancient Library Scrolls Blackened by Vesuvius Are Readable at Last

The 79 A.D. eruption of Mount Vesuvius is most famous for burying Pompeii, spectacularly preserving many artifacts—and residents—in that once bustling town south of Naples. The tumbling clouds of ash also entombed the nearby resort of Herculaneum, which is filled with its own wonders. During excavations there in 1752, diggers found a villa containing bundles of rolled scrolls, carbonized by the intense heat of the pyroclastic flows and preserved under layers of cement-like rock. Further digs showed that the scrolls were part of an extensive library, earning the structure the name Villa of the Papyri.
From Ancient Scrolls Blackened by Vesuvius Are Readable at Last | History | Smithsonian
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Libraries aren't simply city buildings; they're community building blocks

Think about it: a library isn’t just a place where thousands of books are housed on plain shelves with a dusty card catalogue squeaking every time someone opens a wooden drawer. Libraries are public community centres: gathering places for all. In fact, a library is one of the most accessed free public services around anywhere … period. I’m hard-pressed to think of anything else that comes close.
From Libraries aren't simply city buildings; they're community building blocks | Commentary | St. Albert Gazette
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At San Diego's libraries, you can check out bike tools, language classes and Wi-Fi hotspots

“I want people to think about the library as, ‘This is a place where I can go and there are no limits to what I can learn,’” said library director Misty Jones. “I want people to think of us first when they are looking for something cool to do on the weekend or something cool to do at night. I want people to pay attention to what we’re doing because we’re on to something.”
From At San Diego's libraries, you can check out bike tools, language classes and Wi-Fi hotspots - The San Diego Union-Tribune
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Presidential Libraries Are a Scam. Could Obama Change That?

The National Archives and Records Administration—which operates presidential library-museums for every president from Herbert Hoover through George W. Bush—won’t be operating either for Obama. His private Obama Foundation, not the government, will own and operate the museum. And there really won’t be a presidential library. The Obama Foundation will pay for NARA to digitize unclassified records and release them to the public as they become available, but the center’s “Library,” which may or may not house a local branch of the Chicago Public Library, will not contain or control presidential papers and artifacts, digital or otherwise. Instead, according to a NARA press release that called the museum “a new model for the preservation and accessibility of presidential records,” those records will be stored in “existing NARA facilities”—meaning one or more of the agency’s research or records centers across the country.
From Presidential Libraries Are a Scam. Could Obama Change That? - POLITICO Magazine

Why Aren't More Big Donors Giving to Public Libraries?

Which often leads us to wonder: Why don't we see more gifts to libraries? Sure, we've seen some such gifts, but not many as you might think at a moment when so many new donors are showing up in philanthropy, looking for places where their money might make an impact. Libraries could certainly use a boost. In many cities and towns, public libraries are hurting because of budgetary cutbacks—and more cuts may be on the way with the Trump administration targeting federal library funding. 
From Why Aren't More Big Donors Giving to Public Libraries? — Inside Philanthropy
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8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

Centralize reading in your home. Make a public commitment. Find a few trusted, curated lists. Change your mindset about quitting. Take a “news fast” and channel your reading dollars. ....
From 8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year

Librarians in the 21st Century: It Is Becoming Impossible to Remain Neutral

Neutrality doesn’t encourage our critical thinking; it doesn’t ask us to question facts that are wrong, or behaviors that are prejudiced. By this measure, neutrality doesn’t necessarily reveal injustice but further entrenches it, which is ironic.
From Librarians in the 21st Century: It Is Becoming Impossible to Remain Neutral | Literary Hub
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Gunfire @ Your Library (Miami-Dade)

A simmering feud between two men led to gunfire, disorienting panic and calls to police of possible mass casualties at Miami-Dade’s main library yesterday.

In the end, only the gun-wielding man was shot — by a police officer who was off duty in uniform working at the downtown library. Dozens of patrons, some of whom witnessed the altercation, were led to safety. Do we still think open carry is a good idea?

Obama Presidential Center Design Unveiled : NPR

The design for the Obama Presidential Center was unveiled Wednesday at an event attended by former President Obama and Michelle Obama. The Center, slated to be completed in 2021, will be located in the Jackson Park neighborhood of Chicago's South side and it will include three buildings — a museum, forum and library that surround a public plaza. The buildings will be made up of variegated stone with glass openings to allow for natural light and be certified at LEED v4 Platinum for resource efficiency and sustainability.
From Obama Presidential Center Design Unveiled : NPR

Libraries Teach the Difference Between Real News & Fake News

It's happening all around the country. Librarians are teaching patrons and students how to detect "fake news".

In Seattle WA: From King5 News.

In Kenosha WI: From Kenosha WI News

At Fordham U, NY: Fordham University Libraries

In LaSalle, IL: La Salle Public Library

Do you know of other libraries informing their patrons how to spot "fake news"? Let us know in the comments.

Curriculum – Data Privacy Project

Welcome to the curriculum page for the Data Privacy Project. We are pleased to share a set of learning tools that was created with and for library professionals. The curriculum contains a facilitator’s guide, presentation slides, and handouts, and permits remix and reuse under a Share Alike 4.0 Creative Commons license.
From Curriculum – Data Privacy Project

Privacy and Academic Libraries Right Now

Beyond reading this report and preprint, what can we do to learn more and help protect our patrons’ privacy (and our own)? Keeping up with these issues is a good first step.... We can also work to audit our own internal library systems and practices, and to push the vendors we work with to protect patron privacy. Further, we can increase digital privacy awareness among ourselves, our coworkers, and our patrons.
From Privacy and Academic Libraries Right Now | ACRLog

Major report on UK libraries' future slammed as over-optimistic

A report on the future of public libraries from the prestigious Carnegie Trust has been slammed as “over-optimistic”, amid calls for it to be withdrawn. Leading library campaigner Tim Coates has filed a formal complaint with the charity’s trustees, claiming that the report, published last month, “seriously avoids the truth” about the long-term decline of the sector and misrepresents data on library use.
From Major report on libraries' future slammed as over-optimistic | Books | The Guardian
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Gladstone Library, a Refuge for Liberal Values

From the New York Times (a liberal bastion of journalism), an article about the liberal bastion of libraries on the England-Wales border Gladstone's Library.

A library was established by Britain’s high-minded Victorian Liberal prime minister, William Gladstone in the late 19th Century and its now enjoying a boom in use. Unlike the US where all former Presidents establish a library, it is the only Prime Minister's library in the UK. Access is free to all.

The restaurant at Gladstone’s Library, close to the border between Wales and England, is called Food for Thought, and the caterers have been busy recently. Interest has surged in an institution that houses Gladstone’s books and papers and that sees itself as a temple of liberal values, delighting its director, Peter Francis, who believes the trend is a reaction to the rise of populism in Britain to the upcoming Brexit.

Why We’re So Hypocritical About Online Privacy

To address this question, a recent meta-analysis of 166 studies, including 75,269 participants of 34 countries, explored the so-called “privacy paradox,” that is, the puzzling fact that people’s concerns about privacy rarely appear to translate into protective behaviors. Contrary to previous studies, the findings of the meta-analysis revealed that individuals who are more concerned with and informed about privacy tend to use fewer online services, set stronger security settings, and disclose less personal information. However, when it comes to social media use, there is indeed a privacy paradox, as even individuals who express concerns behave quite carelessly, engaging in uncensored or inappropriate self-disclosure, making a great deal of their digital footprint public, and allowing a wide range of external apps to access their data. It has been estimated that nearly 40% of Facebook content is shared according to the (rather unsafe) default settings, and that privacy settings match users’ expectations only 37% of the time. Thus, it appears that no amount of privacy concerns will make social media users more cautious.
From Why We’re So Hypocritical About Online Privacy

Cities Are Driving a Public Library Boom in Australia

Perth opened a new central library last spring in a gleaming cylindrical building that is both a book silo and an architectural exclamation point for one of the world’s most isolated cities. Perth has experienced 50 years of steady growth, topped by a downtown building boom to serve Western Australia mining, making it the nation’s Houston or Denver. So it was high time for the first new municipal building since a concert hall in 1972. The striking design stacks seven levels on the edge of a low bluff overlooking Perth’s rapidly developing recreational waterfront. When I visited one Saturday afternoon, visitors were taking in the view from upper-level balconies, and the floors dedicated to kids were hopping with children exploring the world of ideas.
From Cities Are Driving a Public Library Boom in Australia – Next City
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Harvard Libraries to Extend Loan Periods, Eliminate Standard Late Fees

Harvard libraries will no longer charge 50 cent per day fees on overdue books. The change, one of several detailed in a post on the Harvard Library system’s website, went into effect on April 1. Though standard fees have been eliminated, fees for overdue recalled material have been raised from two dollars a day to three dollars a day, with a 45 dollar maximum. “The goals of these changes are to improve the student experience and embrace a ‘One Harvard’ approach for borrowing material across Harvard Library,” wrote Steven Beardsley, Harvard's associate director for access services administrative operations and special projects, in an email.
From Libraries to Extend Loan Periods, Eliminate Standard Late Fees | News | The Harvard Crimson

A Case For Federally Funding Public Libraries

Under President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, federal funding for public libraries would be eliminated. Our guest explains why he calls the plan an attempt to suppress transparency. He also discusses why he says libraries are “essential” to society, and on this “Take Action for Libraries Day,” how people can advocate for continued funding.
From A Case For Federally Funding Public Libraries | Wisconsin Public Radio
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The end of Academia.edu: how business takes over, again

The lessons to be drawn from this, are the same ones that Siva Vaidhyanathan listed when talking about the Google Books projects. The academic production of knowledge should not be used to make profit, but to improve society. Academic knowledge is, or at least should be a common. The fact that academic knowledge is now part of the ‘for profit’ business can only be understood as the failing of the state and the dominance of neoliberalism. The market destroys academia and the only way to change that is to set up our own platforms. Platforms that only have one goal: to give that knowledge back to society. Fortunately, in a way, this policy shift in Academia.edu now opens a space for new platforms offering genuinely open access for a community of scholars around the world, craving to read and discuss each others' findings, but increasingly constrained by insane paywalls.
From The end of Academia.edu: how business takes over, again | diggit magazine
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The Lost Picture Show: Hollywood Archivists Can’t Outpace Obsolescence

These days, nearly all of the films from all of the major studios are shot and edited digitally. Like Lubezki, filmmakers have switched to digital because it allows a far greater range of special effects, filming conditions, and editing techniques. Directors no longer have to wait for film stock to be chemically processed in order to view it, and digital can substantially bring down costs compared with traditional film. Distribution of films is likewise entirely digital, feeding not only the digital cinema projectors in movie theaters but also the streaming video services run by the likes of Netflix and Hulu. The industry’s embrace of digital has been astonishingly rapid.
From The Lost Picture Show: Hollywood Archivists Can’t Outpace Obsolescence - IEEE Spectrum

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