New Papers Hope Free and Brief Will Attract Younger Readers

Steve Fesenmaier writes "Dena Lanier hands out amNew York, a free condensed daily newspaper that made its debut on Friday. New York is the latest market where publishers are trying out a product that is intended to attract readers aged 21 to 34.

NYTimes Has The Story"

They say target audience is readers aged 21 to 34 - a generation that spends far less time reading newspapers than its parents do.

The challenge of reaching that elusive group was evident in the effort Mr. Johnson was making: he had to meet the gaze of perhaps 20 passers-by before he successfully pressed the paper into the hands of one of them, and many of those hands appeared far older than his employer might have liked.

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Wot a bunch of utter gimboids

If those slobbering idiots had half the brains God gave a grasshopper's ass they'd be able to figure out that the problem is not the readers, it's the papers themselves and the marketroid ploys to pretty them up with cosmetic changes while failing to provide enough substance to the news being reported. I refer the curious party to the following three tomes:

Yesterday's News: Why Canada's Newspapers are Failing Us
John Miller -1998
ISBN 1-55266-000-1
Dewey # 071.1 M648

When MBAs rule the newsroom: how the marketers and managers are reshaping today's media
Doug Underwood.-1993
ISBN 0-231-08048-4
Dewey # 070.4/U56

The Press Effect: Politicians, Journalists, and the Stories That Shape the Political World
Kathleen Hall Jamieson &
Paul Waldman -2003
ISBN 0-19-515277-8
Dewey # 071.3 J323P

Informative, BUT

How about giving us something to read ONLINE?

Re:Informative, BUT

You sound like a college Freshman! Sometimes the best resources aren't found in a Google search. ;)

At risk of offending everyone

I think this paper is a great idea! I haven't picked one up yet, but as someone who spends 45 minutes in each direction standing and either reading or wishing I were reading, I'm glad there's something free and non-awkward to read. At least so far, there are three or four people reading it on every subway car, every morning.

It may, of course, be vapid, but so am I before my second cup of coffee, so it's a perfect match.

(Note: ask me after I've, er, read it.)

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