Harry\'s doing what?

Someone suggested this story from the Australian Paper The Age

\"J.K. Rowling, discussing the next instalment in her bestselling Harry Potter series, said last week that sex is about to enter her young hero\'s life. \"He\'s 14 now and has started to realise that girls are quite interesting. I tend to think that if someone is sufficiently engaged in one of the books, he\'s not going to be too disappointed if, at some point, his hero holds hands with a little girl.\"
Rowling has also promised there will be a death in the new book, evidently seeing herself as something of a taboobreaker. The sequence was conceived as a seven-volume series and her intention from the start has been to let her hero get older, unlike, say, William, who never aged across the 50 years and 39 books in which Richmal Crompton followed his adventures. Some critics, notably Philip Hensher, have dismissed this as a device to hook young readers - Harry growing up with his audience and acting as a kind of magical mirror of their own lives. But the author has convincingly presented it as a means of making a moral point; Harry, the young wizard, has to make his way in the world, prepare to confront the fallen angel who killed his parents and lose his innocence along the way.


\"Harry does grow up,\" Rowling said recently. \"In book four the hormones are going to kick in. I don\'t want him stuck in a state of permanent pre-pubescence, like poor Julian in the Famous Five. And the struggle between good and evil will intensify; there will be deaths. I\'ve thought long and hard about this - I\'m well aware of younger readers - but evil is not something you can deal with lightly. There are consequences, there are victims. Children always ask if Harry will get his parents back, but some things, even in the magical world, are irreversible.\"

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