FRC says sex crimes serious problem in libraries

WASHINGTON, March 15 /PRNewswire/ -- \"There\'s a sea of
evidence that Internet pornography and related sex crimes
are a serious problem in America\'s libraries -- and we\'ve
only uncovered the tip of the iceberg, due to efforts by the
American Library Association to chill the facts,\" said
Family Research Council\'s Chief Spokesperson Janet Parshall
at a news conference Wednesday as FRC released a new
investigative report, \"Dangerous Access, 2000 Edition:
Uncovering Internet Pornography in America\'s Libraries.\"
Written by librarian David Burt after a six-month nationwide
investigation of library documents and computer logs,
\"Dangerous Access, 2000 Edition\" reports over 2,000
incidents of library patrons using online services to access
pornography. It is believed that thousands of more incidents
would have been reported had not the ALA intervened.


At Wednesday\'s press conference, a statement was read from
47 librarians of the Minneapolis Public Library who have
filed protest over their \"daily\" subjection to Internet
pornography accessed by patrons and the ALA\'s denial of the
problem. Also featured at the press conference were Rep.
Ernest Istook (R-OK), who has introduced legislation that
requires filters in public libraries; a 13-year-old girl
from Santa Clara, California, who was victimized by Internet
pornography in her library; and a Seattle librarian who quit
her job in protest of ALA policy that advises librarians not
to intervene when patrons of any age download and print
pornography.


\"Public masturbation, sexual liaisons, and hard-core
depictions of rape, sexual torture, and bestiality -- this
is what is occurring in public libraries, often with full
knowledge of library staff. And the ALA refuses to intervene
in this kind of illegal activity or its victimization of
children and unwitting library patrons,\" Parshall said.
\"It\'s time for the ALA to throw the book at Internet
pornography and make our libraries s

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