It's supposed to be exciting...

This weekend was a washout--for reasons that might have had us excited if we were younger and had different tastes.

To wit, on Saturday we sold my wife's '95 Honda Civic to her niece's boyfriend/fiancee for a fair price.

Sunday, we got her a new car. Buying a new car is supposed to be exciting, thrilling, wonderful. For us, I'm afraid, it was the whole heart of the day gone; like it or not, there doesn't seem to be any way to complete the process in less than half a day.

Consider that we pretty much knew what we were going to buy. The only cars I've ever owned (with me as the principal driver) were a '75 Honda Civic, an '89 Honda Civic DX, and my current car, a 2001 Honda Civic EX. With the exception of an unhappy divergence to an '81 Nissan Sentra (the Honda dealership we dealt with at the time was extremely offputting...), the only cars we've ever owned with my wife as principal driver were an '88 Honda Civic DX and a '95 Honda Civic EX.

Any guesses as to what we purchased?

Truth be told, we considered the Civic Hybrid a lot. Given the tax credit (that pretty much expires after this year), the net price is really only $1,000 or so more than an EX. And, for some reason, I believed that the Hybrid was an EX with a different powertrain. I'd done enough searching to recognize that we weren't going to see greatly improved mileage (we get 42-44 MPG on the highway as is, in the 2001, 25-30 in town). And since all Civics are ULEV's (ultra low emissions vehicles), the difference in pollution would be nominal: Basically, a 1.3liter VTEC engine might pollute a little less than a 1.7liter VTEC engine, but they're both incredibly clean.

Unfortunately, I was misinformed. The hybrid is based on the Civic LX, not the Civic EX--and the extra equipment in the EX is important to us. So an EX it was. 2001 was a major redesign year for the Civic; the next major redesign will probably be 2007 or 2008. Thus, the 2005 was a lot like the 2001: Same superb engine, transmission, brakes; slight differences in the grille and hood; a little extra brightwork in the interior; different gauges; and not much else. The test drive was exactly like driving the 2001.

Most of the "shopping" time was spent deciding between a silver Civic and a "mist" Civic, both exactly the same price, both exactly the same equipment. My wife preferred the mist's light interior, but two things deterred her: A high-pitched, soft whistle in the engine (pitched high enough so that neither I nor the saleman could hear it, not all that unusual) and slightly hot brakes. Both would probably go away after a few hundred miles, but...

So we now have two silver Civic EXes. Side by side, you can see that the new one's just a shade darker than the old. (My wife would have loved to buy a white car, like her '95--but there are no white 2005 Civic EXes.

We really like Honda Civics. They handle well, the EX's VTEC engine has more than enough power (and great torque), they're the most reliable cars on the road, and the 2001+ transmission is smooth. And, to be sure, they don't pollute much and they get great gas mileage (that 42-44 MPG on highway includes hills and using air conditioning all the time, and that is with automatic).

But we're not big driving fans. We buy good transportation. Yeah, I looked at the S2000 for a minute or two, but I wouldn't really want to own one of those (and where do you drive a true sports car?). So getting a new car was as much a chore as a thrill, particularly the extended process of telling the "credit manager" that no, we didn't want this extra, no, we didn't want that extension, no, they could remove the already-installed alarm, no, no, no...

We got what I believe to be a great price (about $17,500 before taxes and license fees, just over $19K out the door). Financing wasn't an issue. Otherwise, who knows how long it would take?
Now, I have to get the detailing done and change our insurance policy...

That, in considerably more than a nutshell, is why I didn't get much of any writing done this weekend.

Comments

You've got it wrong

Buying the damn thing is not thrilling and exciting, it is a step up from drinking barium and getting an upper GI. Owning and driving the thing (at least for a year) is the thrilling and exciting part.

Re:You've got it wrong

Well sure...except that neither of us finds driving exciting in a good way. (Using those ABS brakes thanks to idiots on the freeway: Yes, that's exciting, but not in a good way.)

The neat thing, though, ever since we switched to EX's with the hot VTEC engine: We'd agreed that 10 years was a good time to move to a new car, but if the family sale situation hadn't come along, I think it would have taken me 2-4 years more to get my wife to change: She still loved that 10-year-old (and, admittedly, only 53K miles) Honda, and it was still in near-perfect condition. And I can't bring myself to call my four-year-old Honda our "old car"--it's our less-new car, but it still feels like a brand-new car.

Which, I suppose, makes having a *truly* new car even less exciting!

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