Firefox

Firefox 1.0 (Preview Release) is just out.

Stodgy as I am, I've been using Firefox 0.91 as my preferred browser at work for months now. It may be a little slower to load than IE, but it seems to render pages faster and is presumably (?) less subject to IE's various security problems.

It's worth a try. It's a relatively small download (1.0 is just under 5MB, a little smaller than 0.91), it has a nice set of features, and it does an excellent job of importing your IE bookmarks. I haven't explored the full range of features (for example, there's an "RSS" logo in the lower right hand corner of my screen as I write this, which invites me to "Add Live Bookmark for this page's feed"!), but it's powerful and a good alternative to IE. It's far more compatible than Opera, and doesn't have ads.

So why haven't I gone to Firefox completely--and why do I say "at work"?

Simple: the iNotes Web email client from IBM Lotus, which is how I get to Notes mail from home, won't run under anything but IE--and at work, Onyx (commercial software that we use for a variety of internal functions) won't work under anything but IE.

Such is life. (Eureka runs just fine on Firefox, if you're wondering...)

Comments

Opera

I worked at IBM about a year ago and we used iNotes with Notes 5.5 (or was it 5.05) it worked fairly well together over VPN. I vaguely recall some problems when dialed up but VPN over an ethernet connection worked just dandy.


Then again I quit to finish library school and take a lower paying job so perhaps advice from me is not grade A choice.

so don't use IE for anything else at home

I ran into the same problem at my former place of work. They used the Outlook Exchange Server for mail/calendar/tasks/etc. I could access it using Firefox okay, but the functionality that made it almost as good as the desktop Outlook was lost in that browser. So, I used IE to check my work mail and make calendar changes from home, but for browsing and everything else, I used Firefox. At my new place of work, I can use Firefox for everything and have the same, if not better, functionality as I would have using IE.

Re:so don't use IE for anything else at home

Anna,
In principle I agree--but the fact is, except for a day like today (when I'm posting a new Cites & Insights), I only spend about 10-15 minutes on the net at home. Since that time begins by checking Notes mail, there's just no point in opening IE to dial up, checking Notes, then closing IE and opening Firefox: Not worth the hassle. Particularly since, for what I'm doing in those 10-15 minutes, there's very little difference between the two.

Re:so don't use IE for anything else at home

You can have both open at the same time, unless your computer is a 386 running Win95. ;)

Re:so don't use IE for anything else at home

Hey, I was going to say that! :)

I use either Mozilla or Firefox whenever I can. They have had a few security problems, but nowhere near as many as IE. And when you consider that IE is by design tightly integrated into the operating system (as kmhess has several times pointed out), many of its security problems can be leveraged into what amounts to a root compromise.

Re:so don't use IE for anything else at home

Yes, I know I can have both open. It just isn't worth the bother most times: I'm on, in, and out very rapidly. And between dialup, Norton Personal Firewall, Norton AV, not ever using Outlook/OE, and medium-level security settings on IE--and paranoid attitudes toward email and attachments that I don't personally recognize--I tend to keep risks fairly low. If I was visiting new sites, I would (and do) open Firefox.

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