U.S. Airport Screeners Are Watching What You Read

In October 2001, a man was kicked off a flight because of what he was reading. In 2003, G-Men paid a visit to someone's house after they were caught reading anti-invasion materials. Then the FBI warned us to be on the lookout for persons reading almanacs. Now, Wired News reports that carrying around a book titled Drugs and Your Rights may also get you noticed by security personnel.

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Just in time

for banned book week! Finally, a story about adults reading controversial material.

Re:Just in time

While I am certain each person, the Hayduke reader, the bookstore worker, may have chatted with officials, I think they may have blown things out of proportion in a bit of self aggrandizement. If the stories were fully true would not the mainstream press reported it as well not just creative loafing and indymedia?

The FBI did not warn us to be on the lookout for persons reading almanacs it warned law enforcement agencies. Remember Kathleen Hensman? Just because we are librarians does not me we lose rights that private citizens possess. We can report any suspicious behavior we encounter in such a manner as any reasonable person would. We were not asked to report almanac users, and to suggest otherwise is disingenuous.

Carrying a book about drugs might indeed get you noticed by security personnel, so might having a lovely figure, or carrying a flamingo - ask Jack Hanna.

Airport screeners are not watching what you read despite your anecdotes that require the suspension of disbelief. Your assertion is simply untrue, and that type of behavior besmirches the profession.
When librarians take themselves seriously, the public will as well.

Re:Suspension of disbelief?

Wired is your sole authoratative source?, please.

Re:Suspension of disbelief?

Could it be a 'smear campaign'?

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