Virginia passes law requiring filters on public library computers

Virginia Governor Timothy Kaine (D) just signed into law a bill that requires all public libraries in the state to install Internet filters to block pornography and "obscene" materials that may be harmful to minors. Those choosing not to do so will forfeit all state funding. The new law will take effect on July 1st.
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Forces?

Original paragraph in story: (emphasis via italics added)

The laws in Virginia and Utah are based on the 2000 Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA), a federal law that forces libraries to install filtering software or lose crucial funding from the Library Services and Technology Act and the e-rate program, which provides technology discounts to schools and public libraries. Virginia's bill provides $190,000 to help pay for the installation of library filters.

Modified version #1
The laws in Virginia and Utah are based on the 2000 Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA), a federal law that requires libraries to install filtering software or lose crucial funding from the Library Services and Technology Act and the e-rate program, which provides technology discounts to schools and public libraries. Virginia's bill provides $190,000 to help pay for the installation of library filters.

Modified version #2
The laws in Virginia and Utah are based on the 2000 Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA), a federal law that compels libraries to install filtering software or lose crucial funding from the Library Services and Technology Act and the e-rate program, which provides technology discounts to schools and public libraries. Virginia's bill provides $190,000 to help pay for the installation of library filters.

thank GOD!

This the number one issue facing the libraries and schools of Virginia. Thank GOD they addressed it in time.

Re:Forces?

forces / requires / compels

The word you are looking for is: blackmails.

Re:Forces?

Blackmails? No I don't think so. It is the states money. If they dont want to dole it out or set conditions that is their prerogative.

Re:Forces?

In democracies, governments don't own property; it belongs to the people who live in that democracy; hence the term: public property. Governments only hold it in trust and administer the properties in question, including public funds. As such, the money is as much the property of those who don't want the filters, and they are in the majority.

Aside from which, the "Harmful To Minors" philosophy is a baseless canard; bullshit from start to finish.

"Harmful" like hell!

Ask me for money ...

and I'll put conditions on how you spend it. That is the way it works. Ask any organization for money and they put conditions on it. As a public school librarian I have to follow guidelines about how I spend the money I am given from the school board, the state, the feds. It is life. If I borrowed money from a bank, I would have to follow their rules as well. I can't use my car loan to buy a house!

How is this legal?

According to this article from American Libraries, January 1999:"Thanksgiving came early for freespeech advocates in Loudoun County, Virginia, who won a First Amendment lawsuit November 23 that bars Loudoun County (Va.) Library from requiring Internet filters on all computers at all times as a method of restricting pornography and other material deemed harmful to minors (AL, May 1998, p. 26). Hours after the decision was handed down, board members suspended Internet service in order to revise the library's policy. They approved new guidelines by a vote of 6-2 on December 1 and officials resumed cyberservice two days later.The revised policy states that all Internet terminals must have privacy screens, adults must sign an acceptable-use policy before choosing between blocked and unblocked workstations, and parents must give written permission before youngsters can log on (although they can surf freely if their folks permit it). However, Director Doug Henderson emphasized to American Libraries, "The default is unfiltered."In her summary judgment, U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema wrote that the age-neutral "Policy on Internet Sexual Harassment" that was enacted in October 1997 "offends the guarantee of free speech in the First Amendment and is, therefore, unconstitutional." Brinkema took particular exception to LCL's reliance on LogOn Data Corporation's X-Stop software because the manufacturer doesn't disclose its blocking criteria. A library "cannot avoid its constitutional obligation by contracting out its decision making to a private entity," she wrote."So now that the governor wants filters, it's suddenly not unconstitutional?

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