Belfast ban on Frankenstein

Anonymous Patron writes "The more things change, the more they stay the same... Irelandclick.com has a story on a series of unfortunate events that happened in Belfast, Ireland, way back in 1932.
The first time Frankenstein came to Belfast was in April 1932 when James Whale’s 1931 classic was shown in cinemas throughout Ireland and Britain. In Belfast the film looked as though it was going to be a tremendous success as over 10,000 turned up for the first viewing. It was quickly banned, and how it ended up that way is a case study in censorship. They were, of course, thinking of the children:

"We had to think of the possible effect the picture might have on immature or unbalanced minds. In this connection let me observe that at almost every Court of Assize or Session defending counsel have advanced the plea that their youthful clients got the inspiration for their crimes at the cinema."

The Frankenstein ban was never lifted."

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Not just the children

We had to think of the possible effect the picture might have on immature or unbalanced minds.

Said unbalanced minds to be found only in the lower classes, of course. Your laborer, street-walker, strumpet, smelly unwashed masses and what all. The man wot brings yer coal to the door and the dustman what hauls away yer rubbish, guvnor, but not, of course, your gentrified type of laborer sech as yer butler or scullery maid or whichever you might be havin' a nice illicit affair with on the side, if you catch my drift.

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