Discounts And Used Books Continue To Drive Consumer Demand

This Press Release from Ipsos-Insight says consumer demand for general trade books held steady during 2003 compared to 2002, however spending on a per-book basis slipped, resulting in lower 2003 consumer expenditures.
BookTrends found that while Americans bought nearly the same number of books in 2003 as they did in 2002—1.176 billion books in 2003 versus 1.177 billion books in 2002—overall spending on books decreased 2%, falling from $11.3 billion in 2002 to $11.0 billion in 2003.

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so?

Prices have gone up, especially on mass market paperbacks. They talk about the price of hardcovers going down, well hardcovers cost too much to be an impulse buy for most people, so the drop of $1 or so doesn't matter all that much.I've noticed I don't go into a bookstore and wander around grabbing interesting looking new books anymore. I can't afford it, but I can if I'm at a UBS.When I help people find books they want to buy online they don't care if it's new or used, they just want the lowest price. I'm not sure why we should "read 'em and weep."

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