A Running Tally of Items People Have Asked For At The Circ Desk

Today someone handed me a Costco card. For what purpose? To check out books, of course! This is the fourth time in my illustrious library career that this has happened. In honor of this brave soul (who owes me 600 Costco-sized boxes of Kraft macaroni and cheese and a legit flight of boxed wines if they try this again), I present to you a collection of interesting items people have asked for at the circulation desk:
From Buddy, the Library Isn't a 7-Eleven | Literary Hub
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How an Artist Is Rebuilding a Baghdad Library Destroyed During the Iraq War

“168:01,” as the project by Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal is titled, is a stark white display featuring bookshelves filled with 1,000 blank books. Visitors are encouraged to replenish the volumes with titles from an Amazon wish list compiled by the college’s students and faculty; donations can be made by sending the books on the wish list to the museum, or by gifting funds to the project through Bilal’s website. In exchange for their donations, visitors are able to take home one of the exhibition’s white volumes that represent a rich cultural heritage stripped bare by years of conflict. In turn, the colorful books they contributed to the project will ultimately be sent to the College of Fine Arts.
From How an Artist Is Rebuilding a Baghdad Library Destroyed During the Iraq War | Smart News | Smithsonian
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The Complexity of Simply Searching For Medical Advice

There’s an asymmetry of passion at work. Which is to say, there’s very little counter-content to surface because it simply doesn’t occur to regular people (or, in this case, actual medical experts) that there’s a need to produce counter-content. Instead, engaging blogs by real moms with adorable children living authentic natural lives rise to the top, stating that doctors are bought by pharma, or simply misinformed, and that the shot is risky and unnecessary. The persuasive writing sounds reasonable, worthy of a second look. And since so much of the information on the first few pages of search results repeats these claims, the message looks like it represents a widely-held point of view. But it doesn’t. It’s wrong, it’s dangerous, and it’s potentially deadly.
From The Complexity of Simply Searching For Medical Advice | WIRED
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An Experiment In Asking Questions That Mostly Failed. Twice.

In this article I’m going to tell you about five places to ask questions on the Internet. And hopefully you’ll get better answers than I did! I do think these are great places to ask questions, but I don’t know if I ask terrible questions, or since I’m asking at the beginning of the summer my timing is bad, or something else.
From An Experiment In Asking Questions That Mostly Failed. Twice. – ResearchBuzz
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Family claims win in high court challenge to library cuts

A young girl and her family who took on Northamptonshire county council over its plans to close 21 libraries have claimed a win in the high court, after a judge ruled that the cash-strapped council would have to revisit its plans while “paying attention to its legal obligations”.
From Family claims win in high court challenge to Northants library cuts | Books | The Guardian
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The Relevance of Bookmobiles and Mobile Libraries in 2018

Fast forward thirty years. The magic of the bookmobile remains. But the magic has evolved. Whereas the bookmobile of my youth was a place for my imagination to run amok (and today’s bookmobiles still provide this outlet for all), bookmobiles today have changed the way a library connects to the people it serves. Bookmobiles today serve a more effectual purpose than before—but that is not to say bookmobiles of my youth were ineffectual. As a valued part of any library’s arsenal, bookmobiles today help to disseminate information, erase barriers, and equalize opportunity for all patrons—much like in the past, only in different guises today. Bookmobiles today have spawned other mobile outreach vehicles: vans, buses, campers, bicycles, and scooters; and it is within all these different vehicles that a new type of outreach has developed.
From The Relevance of Bookmobiles and Mobile Libraries in 2018 » Public Libraries Online
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Book enthusiasts get literary-themed tattoos at the Denver Public Library

Certified Tattoo Studios partnered with the Denver Public Library Friends Foundation to offer library- and literary-themed tattoos at the Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales Branch Library on Sunday to raise money for the non-profit.
From PHOTOS: Book enthusiasts get literary-themed tattoos at the Denver Public Library — The Know
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What Does Immersing Yourself in a Book Do To Your Brain?

Through this consciousness-changing dimension of the act of reading, we learn to feel what it means to be despairing and hopeless or ecstatic and consumed with unspoken feelings. I no longer remember how many times I have read what each of Jane Austen’s heroines felt—Emma, Fanny Price, Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice or in her newest incarnation in Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible: A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice. What I know is that each of those characters experienced emotions that helped me understand the range of the often contradictory feelings each of us possesses; doing so leaves us feeling less alone with our particular complex mix of emotions, whatever our life’s circumstances. As expressed in the play Shadowlands, about the life of C. S. Lewis, “We read to know that we are not alone.”
From What Does Immersing Yourself in a Book Do To Your Brain? | Literary Hub
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Punctuation that failed to make its mark

Several writers and inventors in the last century tried to introduce new marks of punctuation into the English language – but they all failed. Keith Houston tells their story.
From BBC - Culture - Punctuation that failed to make its mark
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LGBTQ displays not allowed at any Washington County UT libraries

Equality Utah met with Washington County Library officials for the roundtable discussion. There, the library director confirmed that LGBTQ displays have been banned at every one of Washington County's libraries. "If you put up a display that says LGBTQ, you're pushing away a segment of our society," said Joel Tucker, Washington County Library Director. "Have there every been displays on like, Black History Month, or something like that?" asked  Stephen Lambert, with Equality Utah. 
From LGBTQ displays not allowed at any Washington County libraries
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Being a Victorian Librarian Was Oh-So-Dangerous

And, in fact, a number of female librarians did experience breakdowns, requesting long leaves of absence to recover. In 1900, the Brooklyn Public Library Association proposed “to build a seaside rest home for those who had broken down in library service,” McReynolds writes. One speaker at the American Library Association’s 1910 conference claimed he knew fifty librarians who had become incapacitated by the work, including some who died before their time.
From Being a Victorian Librarian Was Oh-So-Dangerous | JSTOR Daily
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Library's Rare Books Manager Charged in $8M Heist

When appraisers discovered $8 million in rare books missing from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, investigators knew where to turn. As archivist and manager of the William R. Oliver Special Collections Room for 25 years, Gregory Priore let visitors in—and, allegedly, let some 320 items out. According to police, Priore, 61, agreed to sell stolen titles, maps, and plates, along with pages from 16 books, to John Schulman, owner of rare book store Caliban.
From Library's Rare Books Manager Charged in $8M Heist
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'Spectacular' ancient public library discovered in Germany

'Spectacular' ancient public library discovered in Germany Remains of grand building that may have housed up to 20,000 scrolls uncovered in central Cologne, dating back to second century AD
From 'Spectacular' ancient public library discovered in Germany | Books | The Guardian
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Tor Scales Back Library E-book Lending as Part of Test

After years of relatively little change in the library e-book market, there has finally been some movement—unfortunately, librarians say, it is movement in the wrong direction. Leading Sci-Fi publisher Tor Books, a division of Macmillan, has announced that, beginning with July 2018 titles, newly released e-books, will be no longer be available to libraries for lending until four months after their retail on sale date.
From Tor Scales Back Library E-book Lending as Part of Test
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Michelle Obama's First Library Card

Why are middle-aged women invisible on book covers?

It seems the book world doesn’t think readers want to see women of a certain age on their novels – even if that is precisely what the books are about. Take a look at some literary novels about older women – Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge, Elena Ferrante’s The Story of the Lost Child, Anne Tyler’s A Spool of Blue Thread, Carol Shields’ Unless – and you’ll see a lighthouse, two children wearing fairy wings, a young couple in a car and a child standing on her head.
From Why are middle-aged women invisible on book covers? | Alison Flood | Books | The Guardian
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The Art Of Sci-Fi Book Covers

The Art Of Sci-Fi Book Covers

Video from Nerdwriter showing and discussing the art of sci-fi book covers.
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Can You Name a Book? ANY Book??? - YouTube

According to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, almost one in four Americans has not read a book in the past year. So to find out if that is true, we sent a team to the street to ask pedestrians to name a book, and here are the very sad results.
From Can You Name a Book? ANY Book??? - YouTube
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Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread

Bold efforts to push academic publishing towards an open-access model are gaining steam. Negotiators from libraries and university consortia across Europe are sharing tactics on how to broker new kinds of contracts that could see more articles appear outside paywalls. And inspired by the results of a stand-off in Germany, they increasingly declare that if they don’t like what publishers offer, they will refuse to pay for journal access at all. On 16 May, a Swedish consortium became the latest to say that it wouldn’t renew its contract, with publishing giant Elsevier.
From Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread
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Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads

Swedish universities have moved to cancel their contract with journal publisher Elsevier as concern over slow progress towards open access spreads. The Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 higher education and research institutions in the country, said that its current agreement with Elsevier would not be renewed after 30 June.
From Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads | Times Higher Education (THE)
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