Dutch universities start their Elsevier boycott plan

“We are entering a new era in publications”, said Koen Becking, chairman of the Executive Board of Tilburg University in October. On behalf of the Dutch universities, he and his colleague Gerard Meijer negotiate with scientific publishers about an open access policy. They managed to achieve agreements with some publishers, but not with the biggest one, Elsevier. Today, they start their plan to boycott Elsevier.

From Dutch universities start their Elsevier boycott plan | Univers

Librarians @ the Beach

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WVEC) Now this was a cool job, being part of a brand new program from Virginia Beach Public Library, initiated by librarian Kellye Carter, called Books at the Beach.

On this day another librarian with 33 years experience was helping us out, Denise Barnhart. The WVEC reporter, Joe Flanagan (pictured, center) was worried that offering free books to Oceanfront visitors may be a challenge because he didn't have any librarian skills.

"We can teach that. We can't teach compassion. We can't teach caring. But we can teach anybody how to do the day-to-day things," said Kellye Carter, manager of the Oceanfront Area Library. The books were collected by the Friends of the Library.

New 300 ppi version -- Amazon Kindle Paperwhite

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Chip Kidd: The art of first impressions — in design and life

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.
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'Patience And Fortitude' And The Fight To Save NYC's Storied Public Library

Since it opened in 1911, the building has become a New York City landmark, praised not only for its beauty but also for its functional brilliance. In the words of one contemporary architect, the main branch of The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street is "a perfect machine for reading." The grand Reading Room sits atop seven levels of iron and steel books stacks whose contents could, at one time, be delivered to anybody who requested a book within a matter of minutes via a small elevator. Those stacks also support the floor of the Reading Room above.

Financial support for The New York Public Library, however, was never as firm as its structural underpinnings. In a gripping new book called, Patience and Fortitude (the title, of course, derives from the names of the two iconic lions that guard the library's entrance), reporter Scott Sherman details how deficits and bottom-line business logic very nearly gutted one of the world's greatest public research libraries.

http://www.npr.org/2015/06/24/416780087/patience-and-fortitude-and-the-fight-to-save-nycs-st...

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The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book

Where do the impeccably selected libraries that appear in society pages and design magazines come from? Many are the work of private library curators - who scour the world to find the books that will both look pleasing on the shelf and reflect the interests of the library's owner.

From The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book - BBC News

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Book 'em: All libraries put up with plenty

"Our public library is a safe place but what people need to remember is that it is a public place," said Celeste Choate, Urbana Free Library Executive Director. "So for example we encourage people to keep their possessions with them. You don't want to leave your phone on the table and walk away because it's a public place. You wouldn't do that at Target. That's the kind of thing I think some patrons forget. They feel so comfortable at the public library. They feel it's homey and they forget that it's not their home and that it's a public place."

From Book 'em: Area libraries put up with plenty | News-Gazette.com

How to Read A Book

The goal of reading determines how you read.

Reading the latest Danielle Steel novel is not the same as reading Plato. If you’re reading for entertainment or information, you’re going to read a lot differently (and likely different material) than reading to increase understanding. While many people are proficient in reading for information and entertainment, few improve their ability to read for knowledge.

From How to Read A Book

Moving The LGBT Collections Out Of "abnormal sexual relations"

A number of years ago, a young man came to the reference desk with a question for the Social Science, Philosophy & Religion department librarians.  He asked me why books about gay men were next to the shelves with incest and sexual bondage books.  He said that wasn't how he was at all.  His face showed deep hurt and from his expression, I read that as a gay man who came of age in the 21st century, he had never experienced the kind of marginalization, ostracization and ridicule I had seen my friends fight when I was his age.  It had likely never occurred to him that the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) itself would assign lesbians, gay men, bisexual people and transgender people (LGBT people) to a call number, 301.4157, as a kind of "abnormal sexual relations" (modified 14th edition of the DDC).  But, as a librarian and classificationist, I knew that earlier call numbers had been more demeaning.

From LGBT Collections moving to new call number area | Los Angeles Public Library

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The Word the Internet Didn't Know

That’s right: A 17th century English word that means “coming together through the binding of two ropes,” according to a 1627 publication housed at the New York Public Library’s Rare Book Division, was, until this month, dead to the digital world—and to almost every living person.

From The Word the Internet Didn't Know

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Sioux Falls Man Donates Collection Of Nearly 18,000 Books

The University of Iowa has struck gold. Not the kind that lies in the federal reserve, but one of paper in a Sioux Falls man's basement. After 20 years of collecting, he is donating his one-of-a-kind collection of 17,500 books worth an estimated three quarters of a million dollars.

From Sioux Falls Man Donates Collection Of Nearly 18,000 Books | KDLT.com South Dakota News - News, Sports, and Weather Sioux Falls South Dakota

How far can we stretch the public library? Library as Infrastructure

I propose that thinking about the library as a network of integrated, mutually reinforcing, evolving infrastructures — in particular, architectural, technological, social, epistemological and ethical infrastructures — can help us better identify what roles we want our libraries to serve, and what we can reasonably expect of them. What ideas, values and social responsibilities can we scaffold within the library’s material systems — its walls and wires, shelves and servers?

From Library as Infrastructure

A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news

Gabriela Adamo, who until recently was the president of the city’s annual book fair – an event which draws over 1 million visitors each year – says Argentina’s love affair with the book is related to the wave of mass immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

From A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news | The Guardian

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Digital Privacy and Security at ALA Next Week #alaac15

Join Blake Carver from LYRASIS and Alison Macrina from the Library Freedom Project to learn strategies for security from digital surveillance. We'll teach tools that keep data safe inside the library and out -- securing your network, website, and PCs, and tools you can teach to patrons in computer classes. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff.

From Digital Privacy and Security: Keeping You And Your Library Safe and Secure In A Post-Snowden World | 2015 ALA Annual Conference

The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth

I’ve also learned that the real story is not at all the one you commonly hear—the tale of a gigantic space below our usual web, where hard-to-find vices are traded among sordid individuals totally beyond the grasp of the authorities. That is not what the dark web is.

From The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth | WIRED

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Charleston Library Manager Killed in Shooting at Church

From the CCPL website: Charleston County Public Library is devastated by the senseless shootings Wednesday night at Mother Emmanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston that took the lives of nine members of our community, including one of our own - St. Andrews Regional Library Manager Cynthia Hurd. Cynthia was a tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.

To honor our co-worker and all those lost, Charleston County Public Library's 16 locations are closed today, Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Cynthia worked with Charleston County Public Library 31 years, serving as branch manager of the John L. Dart Branch from 1990-2011 before becoming manager of the St. Andrews Regional Library.

Her loss is incomprehensible, and we ask for prayers for her family, her co-workers, her church and this entire community as we come together to face this tragic loss.

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Stuffed Animal Husbandry: Caring for Winnie-the-Pooh and Friends @ The New York Public Library

The New York Public Library is the proud home of the REAL Winnie-the-Pooh, the actual toy teddy bear that once belonged to Christopher Robin Milne, son of A. A. Milne, and the basis for the character Christopher Robin in the beloved Winnie-the-Pooh stories.

From Stuffed Animal Husbandry: Caring for Winnie-the-Pooh and Friends | The New York Public Library

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Mapping Books: Mapping pre-1600 European manuscripts in the U.S. and Canada

Unsurprisingly one can see the concentration of pre-1600 European manuscript holdings along the east coast. In a league table of manuscript holders New York, Washington, and Philadelphia(!) come out on top by volume but in terms of individual institutions the Huntington and Folger with their extensive holdings of pre-1600 documents come out on top.

From Mapping Books: Mapping pre-1600 European manuscripts in the U.S. and Canada

So Which Is It? Wikipedia II

A project in utilitarian data visualization...or an absurdist poetic gesture?

From The New York Times:

IT is a mammoth undertaking by College of Staten Island teacher Michael Mandiberg.to convert the online encyclopedia Wikipedia onto the printed page possibly in hundreds of volumes.

“When I started, I wondered, ‘What if I took this new thing and made it into that old thing?’ ” he said in a recent interview in his studio in Downtown Brooklyn. “ ‘What would it look like?’ ”

On Thursday, he and the rest of the world will find out, when the exhibition “From Aaaaa! To ZZZap!” based on his larger project “Print Wikipedia,” opens at the Denny Gallery on the Lower East Side. There, Mr. Mandiberg will hit “start” and a computer program will begin uploading the 11 gigabytes of very compressed data from a Mac Mini to the print-on-demand website Lulu.com.

ALA Questions Bid for Independent Copyright Office

Via Publishers Weekly:

The American Library Association is joining a chorus of Internet and tech businesses in questioning a proposal to remove the U.S. Copyright Office from the purview of the Library of Congress, and to establish it as its own independent agency.

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