Memory and the Printing Press

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Before the printing press, memory was the main store of human knowledge. Scholars had to go to find books, often traveling around from one scriptoria to another. They couldn’t buy books. Individuals did not have libraries. The ability to remember was integral to the social accumulation of knowledge. Thus, for centuries humans had built ways to remember out of pure necessity.
From Memory and the Printing Press

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