Blogs

Making Original Copies

"The Story" on APM had this piece:

Ken Perenyi paints like Rembrandt - and Modigliani and Picasso. He can forge a brush stroke better than most, and for a time he actually sold his works as originals in the big auction houses. He had a close call with the F.B.I., and now he makes pieces that are labeled as copies. He calls himself a "master forger," and he tells his story in his book Caveat Emptor: The Secret Life of an American Art Forger.

Download MP3 here

Comment on political post

We are nearing the election and some news stories and books may be appearing that are relevant for LISNEWS posts. I wanted to give some background on my thought process in regards to political posts.

I have zero interest in endorsing any candidate in this forum.

My posting a story that has a political topic, theme is not an endorsement of the specific article. If I am not endorsing the article why I am posting it would be a valid question. My answer would be that there are many articles and books that are good to be aware of whether you agree with their content or not. I would expect this to be a view held by many librarians but I have been surprised how often this is not the case. Too many times I have received a response to an article that assumes my motive in posting a story is me saying - "You must believe what is in this article" as compared to what I was trying to do was make people aware of an article.

If you think an article does not belong on the site say so. If you think an article makes a good point consider leaving a comment mentioning what that is. If an article makes a bad point consider commenting on that. More discussion is better than less discussion.

When the Network Effect Goes Into Reverse

The more users a social network site like Facebook attracts, the more others will want to use it. But a site’s audience can decline just as quickly as it grows.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/18/business/Sites-Like-Groupon-and-Facebook-Disappoint-Invest...

Perhaps the revolution has reached an evolutionary stage

Perhaps the revolution has reached an evolutionary stage
http://www.idealog.com/blog/perhaps-the-revolution-has-reached-an-evolutionary-stage/

Excerpt: The dizzying pace at which US consumers were switching from print to digital couldn’t last forever. Based on the numbers being published by the AAP, with a huge assist in interpretation by Michael Cader at Publishers Lunch, it seems that the slowdown has become very noticeable in the past 12 months.

Cites & Insights 12:8 (September 2012) available

The September 2012 Cites & Insights (12:8) is now available for downloading at http://citesnadinsights.info/civ12i8.pdf

The issue is 36 pages long. The single-column 6x9 version, designed for online reading, is 67 pages long.

The issue includes these articles (available as HTML separates from http://citesandinsights.info or via the article name links):
Libraries
Public Library Closures: 2010 Update (pp. 1-2)

A brief look at reported library closures in the FY2010 IMLS tables, updating previous Public Library Closure articles.

Words
Thinking About Blogging, Part 1 (pp. 2-34)

Catching up on a few interesting blogging-related items. (Part 2, next issue, focuses on libraries, liblogs and starting, stopping and pausing. Part 1 focuses on issues such as names, comments, science blogging, Brilliant Statements--or, if you prefer, Bewildering Stuff, gengen, technology and the philosophy of blogging, and the power of blogging. Note that this essay prints out as roughly 57 pages in HTML form; if you want it printed, save paper and download the whole issue.

A Reef in Time: The Great Barrier Reef from Beginning to End

Book: A Reef in Time: The Great Barrier Reef from Beginning to End

Like many coral specialists fifteen years ago, J. E. N. Veron thought Australia's Great Barrier Reef was impervious to climate change. "Owned by a prosperous country and accorded the protection it deserves, it would surely not go the way of the Amazon rain forest or the parklands of Africa, but would endure forever. That is what I thought once, but I think it no longer." This book is Veron's Silent Spring for the world's coral reefs.

Veron presents the geological history of the reef, the biology of coral reef ecosystems, and a primer on what we know about climate change. He concludes that the Great Barrier Reef and, indeed, most coral reefs will be dead from mass bleaching and irreversible acidification within the coming century unless greenhouse gas emissions are curbed. If we don't have the political will to confront the plight of the world's reefs, he argues, current processes already in motion will become unstoppable, bringing on a mass extinction the world has not seen for 65 million years.

Cowboys Full: The Story of Poker

Book received a Publisher's Weekly starred review.

From James McManus, author of the bestselling Positively Fifth Street, comes the definitive story of the game that, more than any other, reflects who we are and how we operate.

Cowboys Full is the story of poker, from its roots in China, the Middle East, and Europe to its ascent as a global—but especially an American—phenomenon. It describes how early Americans took a French parlor game and, with a few extra cards and an entrepreneurial spirit, turned it into a national craze by the time of the Civil War. From the kitchen-table games of ordinary citizens to its influence on generals and diplomats, poker has gone hand in hand with our national experience. Presidents from Abraham Lincoln to Barack Obama have deployed poker and its strategies to explain policy, to relax with friends, to negotiate treaties and crises, and as a political networking tool. The ways we all do battle and business are echoed by poker tactics: cheating and thwarting cheaters, leveraging uncertainty, bluffing and sussing out bluffers, managing risk and reward.

Publishers Make Poor Poker Players

When I was young, I had an eccentric, poker-playing uncle. At family reunions, he loved to show me how to play five-card draw, which introduced me to the concept of betting and bluffing. He’d deal out the cards, ask me to make a mock wager with fake chips, and then tell me to decide whether to fold or go all-in. As an 11-year old, my poker-playing skills weren’t well-honed. So, invariably, I’d fall for my uncle’s bluff by folding too early, turning over our cards, only to find out that I had held the winning hand.

How Google's 'Penguin' Update Will Change Publishing, for the Better

How Google's 'Penguin' Update Will Change Publishing, for the Better

The ISBN Users Manual

Attention Is the New Currency

With so many more distractions available to disrupt their attention, perhaps there is more academic librarians could do to help students achieve academic success.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/08/opinion/steven-bell/attention-is-the-new-currency-from-...

David Rakoff

Essayist and humorist David Rakoff has died, novel to be published in 2013
http://books.usatoday.com/bookbuzz/post/2012-08-10/essayist-and-humorist-david-rakoff-has-di...

Finding the Price of Fairness

A new book by Kenneth Feinberg traces his years of work in assessing and paying victims’ claims after disasters, whether the 9/11 attacks, the Virginia Tech massacre or the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Article in the NYT

A Message For Podcast Subscribers

No, the campaign for county commissioner isn't happening as of yet. A PDF message is still being forward to feed subscribers, though.

Laser etched Kindle 2

The Good News About the Future of Libraries

Librarians are only surpassed by religious fundamentalists in their dystopian view of their futures. The past week has shown to me that all this negativity may well be unwarranted. The sheer number of news sources and bloggers who picked up the story of the .Texas Wal Mart that was turned into a library demonstrates to me that when people really think about it, they want to see libraries succeed.

When I first dipped my foot into social media people would frequently ask me, "When will books go away? When will libraries disappear?" That was back when the e-book reader was born and the stock market crash started. The economy was shaken to its core. The fiscal libertarians salivated over the possibility of the possibility of eviscerating the government and slashing the social safety net to shreds. Conservatives and liberals looked at the internet as the ultimate replacement of everything library. Data phones, e-book readers and tablet computers seemed to point to a future when libraries and paper books could be viewed as irrelevant.

FedEx: The Office Meeting

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