Banned Books Week September 22?28, 2013 : South Sioux City Public Library Plans Activities to Celebrate the Freedom to Read

The following is a press release that has been today, September 20th, 2013.

Banned Books Week September 22?28, 2013 : South Sioux City Public Library Plans Activities to Celebrate the Freedom to Read

The South Sioux City Public Library, 2121 Dakota Avenue, South Sioux City,Nebraska will celebrate Banned Books Week with the following activities.

A Banned Books Week Presentation will be held on Monday September 23rd at 6:30 p.m. Dave Mixdorf will discuss Banned Books Week, some of the books that have been challenged.

Violating Constitutional Separation of Powers is American Library Association's Latest Move for Net Neutrality

I have a problem when people feel the need to call for the violation of the US Constitution to advocate for net neutrality. I mean if it were so good, an honest argument would be used, no? See:

"Violating Constitutional Separation of Powers is American Library Association's Latest Move for Net Neutrality"

This is a library issue not seen before, to my knowledge. So I hope it adds to LISNews's diversity.

LIS Education Curriculum: More Emphais on Practice

In the LIS curriculum library visits are already included. A physical visit to leading four/five libraries once in two years will not give more real exposure. LIS curriculum should be such when students finish their study least each student have should visited all types of libraries with primary school, secondary school, higher secondary school, Pre College, Arts College, Commerce College, Science College, Management Library, Pharmacy College, Medical College, Nursing College, Ayurvedic College, Homeopathic College, Hospital Library, Engineering (civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, IT, electronic) Library, Architecture College, Public Library includes Village, District, State, National Library, University Library, various types of Institutional Library, Specialized Library with industries, Archival Library etc.

Initially in the first year students should visit as users in the second as professional. They should be good observer and LIS department can help them in identifying the checklist to be observed and studied when they visit various libraries. Some of the checklist could be before going to a library they should collect maximum information from the website about academic activity and library, ambience of a library, target audience, resources print and electronic. Print covers books, reference books, journals, magazines, newspapers, etc. Electronic resources cover e-journals, e-books, e-magazines, e-reports, DVD, etc. Information technology used by various libraries, and others such A to Z, federated search, new open source software. The most important part is resource knowledge, management and communication skills.

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) is now available at

The issue is 48 pages long. The single-column 6x9 "online reading version" is 65 pages long.

In fact, most of the regular version also fits into a 6" width; it's made up of book samples that didn't reduce neatly to the narrow column of the two-column version.

The issue consists of one big essay in six smaller portions plus an introduction:

The Front: Books, Books and (Books?) pp. 1-48

It's all about books--specifically, Cites & Insights Books for libraries and librarians: What may be happening with older books, two important new books, one potential new book and two new combinations of old material.

Weeding the Virtual Bookstore pp. 2-3

Some of the existing Cites & Insights Books may go out of print (that is, be removed from potential production) shortly. This section explains why, which books are involved and why--if you actually want one of them--you need to act soon.

Your Library Is...: A Collection of Public Library Sayings pp. 3-10

An inspiring and interesting tour through what America's public libraries choose as their mottoes and slogans on their websites, based on a complete scan of all 9,000+ libraries (or at least those for which I could find websites). 1,137 unique mottoes and slogans, plus 88 mottoes and slogans shared by 205 libraries. General comments, price and availability (this one's available as an $8.99 PDF!) are followed by the Cs: Sayings from libraries in California, Colorado and Connecticut, roughly 9.5 of the 157 text pages in the book.

$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets, Vol. 1, Libraries by Size pp. 10-24

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

On sale on Amazon for $1.99

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) is now available for downloading at the Cites & Insights homepage.

The early, special issue is 10 pages long. If you're reading online or doing anything other than printing it out, you're much better off downloading the single-column online edition, which is 24 pages long, as most of the special issue is a rough draft of a book chapter that includes graphs and tables, which had to be compressed (reducing the type size in the tables quite a bit!) to fit into the narrower columns of the print version.

The issue consists of a single essay (albeit one that includes a draft book chapter as an example):

$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets--Help Needed pp. 1-10

I've started the followup to Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-13), and I'm trying to crowdfund inexpensive or free versions of the book (and presell copies) through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

This issue describes the project: Two books (one with libraries by size, one with libraries by state) combining tables, graphs and commentary to offer reasonably detailed pictures of countable public library benefits for FY2011 and how they've changed from 2009 to 2011, and A Library Is..., a collection of public library slogans and mottoes.

Cites & Insights 13:8 available

Cites & Insights 13:8 (August 2013) is now available for downloading at

The regular two-column print-oriented issue is 28 pages long; the online-oriented 6x9 single-column version is 54 pages long.

The issue includes:
Perspective: Differences pp. 1-7

Yes, Perspectives is back--this time with an essay about perception and value.

Social Networks pp. 7-21

The smile of a lonely realist

Sometimes a book is worthwhile for one good line in the book.
This line from the book "Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban" made the entire book worthwhile to me.


The man smiled with exaggerated patience. It was the smile of a lonely realist stranded in the society of cloud-cuckoos.

Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban (page 19)

'Pernicious' Effects of Economic Inequality

It's been said that money is the root of all evil. Does money make people more likely to lie, cheat and steal? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on new research from the University of California, Berkeley about how wealth and inequality affects us psychologically.

Sidewalk poetry box

Sidewalk poetry box wins more fans for free verse

Poetry boxes at the library?

Cites & Insights 13:7 (July 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:7 (July 2013) is now available for downloading at

The regular PDF version (two columns, 8.5x11", designed for print) is 26 pages.

The "online version" (also PDF, one column, 6x9", designed and optimized for online reading) is 52 pages.

Note that this is another case where the online version will offer a better display of one article (the first one) because of graphs.

The issue includes:
The Big Deal and the Damage Done pp. 1-6

If you're in an academic library, you need to be aware of this study, now available in three versions: A regular PDF (no DRM) for $9.99, a paperback for $16.50 and, especially suitable for library schools and any library wishing to make it broadly available, a campus license PDF version for $40 that explicitly allows mounting the book on a campus ebook or other server that allows multiple simultaneous access or downloading by authorized students and other users.

This article includes Chapter 1 of the book and a segment of the concluding chapter. It includes eight graphs that will be easier to read in the one-column version, although they're all entirely readable in the two-column version.

Technology pp. 6-10

A dozen little essays about a dozen specific technologies.

The CD-ROM Project pp. 10-16

Moving toward the finish line: Possibly the last installment in this series, mostly a set of disappointments with two bright spots.


To Save Everything, Click Here

Book: To Save Everything, Click Here

In the very near future, “smart” technologies and “big data” will allow us to make large-scale and sophisticated interventions in politics, culture, and everyday life. Technology will allow us to solve problems in highly original ways and create new incentives to get more people to do the right thing. But how will such “solutionism” affect our society, once deeply political, moral, and irresolvable dilemmas are recast as uncontroversial and easily manageable matters of technological efficiency?

Marketing Libraries to Men: Beyond Tom Clancy and W.E.B. Griffin

My thoughts began whirring after reading an article entitled On Men, Elevator Speeches and Market Segments on the Marketing for Libraries. by Library People blog. I had already posted a comment on my elevator speech to the article and then began to thinking about men as a market segment.

Cites & Insights 13:6 (June 2013) now available

The June 2013 Cites & Insights (13:6) is now available for downloading from

The issue is available as a 42-page print-oriented two-column PDF or an 81-page single-column 6x9" online-oriented PDF.

You might think of this as a side-effect issue, as both pieces grow out of work done for the Open Access preconference I did at the Washington/Oregon Library Associations joint conference last week:
The Front: The Big Deal and the Damage Done: Available Now (pg.1)


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