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Another Conservative Critique of Anti-Terror Laws

One of the memes I desperately try to smother whenever I see it is "Only blindly-naive liberals are against anti-terror laws. They've been brainwashed by the ACLU!"

It is in this spirit I wish to offer a link and some quotes from a 2002 Cato Institute report that the Institute commended to our attention on January 30, 2003 in their Daily Dispatch.

The report, "Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Preserving Our Liberties While Fighting Terrorism" warns:

"Government officials typically respond to terrorist attacks by proposing and enacting "antiterrorism" legislation. To assuage the wide-spread anxiety of the populace, policymakers make the dubious claim that they can prevent terrorism by curtailing the privacy and civil liberties of the people. Because everyone wants to be safe and secure, such legislation is usually very popular and passes the legislative chambers of Congress with lopsided majorities. As the president signs the antiterrorism bill into effect, too many people indulge in the assumption that they are now safe, since the police, with their newly acquired powers, will somehow be able to foil the terrorists before they can kill again. The plain truth, however, is that it is only a matter of time before the next attack.

This cycle of terrorist attack followed by government curtailment of civil liberties must be broken—or our society will eventually lose the key attribute that has made it great: freedom. The American people can accept the reality that the president and Congress are simply not capable of preventing terrorist attacks from occurring. Policymakers should stop pretending otherwise and focus their attention on combating terrorism within the framework of a free society."

This 21 page report goes to catalog a number of the errors made prior to 9/11 that were NOT addressed by the USA PATRIOT Act and other "security laws" and reminds readers of prior abuses of gov't power. The report concludes with some suggestions that the author believes would make a more tangible contribution to security than expanded government powers.

Here's one last quote I think deserves mention:

"Freedom is not, was not, and will never be, a free good. Anyone who wants it must be prepared to defend it. And defending it necessarily carries the risk of seriously bodily injury or death. A free and independent people must take responsibility for their own safety and deal with their vulnerability in a mature fashion. A free and independent people should not expect supernatural powers from their president."

In the interest of full disclosure, I should mention this report makes the passing suggestion that the best defense against terror is a good offense. Not in the sense of invading and occupying entire countries, but in the sense of sending assaination squads against terrorist leaders. While I don't have a good answer to this, I can't believe such a policy would be any more effective than Israel's policy of killing terrorist leaders. There seems to be a neverending supply of people to take up the terror leadership. I suspect that we'd find the same.

The CATO Institute, for people unfamilar with it, describes itself this way:

"The Cato Institute seeks to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets and peace. Toward that goal, the Institute strives to achieve greater involvement of the intelligent, concerned lay public in questions of policy and the proper role of government."

Stuff Barb Don't Want

I love these posts! I hope Robin Rose Yuran decides to contribute more "Stuff Barb Don't Want," althought I haven't seen anything lately.

Stuff Barb Don't Want #1 : at the circ desk
Stuff Barb Don't Want #2 : What is This, General Hospital?
Stuff Barb Don't Want #3 : Jesus Eye on the Genealogist Guy

On my day off, I'm so bored

I guess this means I like what I do, which is naturally a good thing. Believe me, I've had jobs where every minute is a living hell. This one, every minute is challenging, but in general a good experience.

Filtering software is my nemesis. Not because I have feelings about filtering one way or the other, really, but more because it's so damn easy to forget to enable it. I think I may have forgotten on one computer. Ahem. It shall remain nameless, but honestly is positioned in such a place and manner, that if you really wanted to view porn on it, everyone would know. I'll get to it tomorrow morning, first thing, and check. I was so preoccupied on this particular terminal with getting the silly security software fixed, the filtering software was far from my mind. What it is: Boston has it in front of their firewall. Or something. Boston actually has it though. And it's a serious case of out of sight out of mind for me.

I guess my concern with having one unfiltered terminal with many filtered ones (soon to be two unfiltered terminals with many filtered ones) is that it seems to be giving permission to view porn. I heard a staff member (not a librarian) say, "What can you say when they view it?" Well, you can say, "That's not appropriate in the library." But then I thought... well, look what we did. We positioned the terminal facing away from everything else, behind a column -- the patrons are hidden at these terminals. If I say something to the person there about what they're viewing, it makes it uncomfortably obvious that I was looking at what they were doing, and that bothers me. I don't want the patrons to feel like they have to hide when the librarian comes by.

I'd like to at least have the terminals facing inward, or turned around, or moved... And it sort of bothers me that terminal 2, which is currently down, is right by the young adult room.

LAN connections are at a premium in the library. Wireless would be good in this respect, at least for us. We could put those unfiltereds anywhere. We could put staff computers anywhere. But there are still a lot of unknowns for me in that respect, so it's still a future project.

Perhaps a policy in place, something written in our Unfiltered Policies section, would be a nice way to give us an out if we notice someone viewing something they shouldn't. I have declared no printing from the unfiltered terminals. I just don't want Johnny's print out from InfoTrac mixed in with Cindy's Hot and Dirty WebCam. People have made mistakes and printed out the wrong stuff already, so I think it's a sound suggestion.

Off to read about AppleTalk. And call my mom.

Some End O' The Month Stats

January is as good as over so it seems like a good time to look back at 2004 and see how things are going. First, a bit on referrals to LISNews. Google 14,308 (3,300 for the week), Yahoo, 4,056 (945). That's the number of referrals LISNews got this month. I'm mentioning that because of the fact that Yahoo has dropped, or is going to drop google soon, and some people seem to think that's a big deal. I'm thinking nothing will change for most sites, but it'll be interesting to watch. MSN is third at 1972 (441), and AOL is a distant 4th at 728 (192). Overall google accounts for almost 54% of all search engine referrals, and that's just google.com. It's rare that a non-search engine, non-rwss reader shows up in the top ten, this week Jessamyn has sent well over a hundred surfers our way. memepool sent a whopping 2,000 folks our wa for the month as well.

There were 3 RSS files in the top ten most popular pages this month. We had a daily average of just over 4,000 people a day, about 51,000 hits a day, and we served about 11,000 pages a day.

I'd also say this is the month the Journals really got interesting. Overall the journals were read about 20,000 times this month. The most popular being:
shoe 641
nbruce 578
Blake 387
Daniel 323
birdie 292
Rochelle 284
djfiander 266
AshtabulaGuy 193
Bibliofuture 134
madcow 128
donwarnersaklad 128
mcbride 127
Karl 122
Great Western Dragon 118
singingbelle 115
daidy 107

Another one for the baby book, ma

Monday I get to take down my first Windows 2003 server. Looks fairly straightforward. I guess there's some function that asks why you're shutting down. I suppose I should put down something useful in that field, rather than, 'Because I want to!'

So why am I shutting down? Well, I can ping (god, I love networking terms) the Apples, but that's about it. I want to see if I can enable AppleTalk. And I have to get the permanent license up on our print server. For some reason that requires restarting the program. Since I have to take the whole thing down anyway, well, then, I guess I'll just take the whole thing down anyway.

Today I went to fix some stuff at the branch library. I wish all computer problems were as simple as these... reinstall IE, and whamo! We're up and running again. I found a bit of adware on the computers, but I think she actually uses it. So I didn't remove it.

I was there till six, and then I excused myself. My husband was nuts, thinking I was kidnapped or something on my way home.

At the public access terminals: Terminal 7 is, right now, just a monitor. No keyboard. No mouse. And most importantly, no box. I like to count how many people come in and say, "Is seven down?" Um. Do the math. Also at the public access terminals: Today a guy came in to use the computers, and actually erased somebody else's name that was on the sign up sheet, before the actual reservation time. Hello. Even better, he actually erased it and put in his real name.

So when the guy who legitimately made his appointment came up and said, "Insertnamehere erased my name", Mr. Insertnamehere turned around and looked to see who was talking about him. Smooth operator, Mr. Insertnamehere.

I ordered an eval version of software and realized I shouldn't have today. I don't think they charge for it... But I guess it's not our policy. But eval software isn't functional like, say, an eval reference book is.

I think I'm okay. I confessed, anyway.

Today I went into the children's room, and the children's librarian clapped when she saw me. It was like having my own show. I am going up there and making an entrance more often.

At the ref desk--remarkable!

I'm continually surprised at the personal stories that patrons share in the course of trying to find information. Yesterday, a 20-something guy came in, looking for an article about a new Illinois law that extends the statute of limitations for people who, as children, were molested by clerics. I found an article, but wanted to find the statute. Since it's so new, it hadn't been added to the statutes, so it was taking me a long time. While we were looking, the guy, without any sort of prompting, spilled his whole story to me. The armchair psychologist in me was trying to figure out his motive for telling me this very personal story, but regardless of the reason, I found it remarkable and was reminded of the awesome responsibility that sometimes comes to us as information providers. This guy knows nothing about me, my viewpoint, my education or training, but he trusted me to help him with something that would be best handled by a counselor and a lawyer, all because I'm a LIBRARIAN. This isn't a unique situation--I'm sure you all have similar stories. It's just humbling and, at times, alarming, to realize how much power and authority some people assume librarians have.

Field trips and police visits

This is a week of field trips for me. Today I got to go to a computer shop that will remain nameless, so that the computer could work perfectly there. Well. I told them to hold on to the stupid computer and keep hitting the power button periodically. I swear, every other computer we have starts just dandy. It's gotta be the power supply.

Tomorrow I'm taking a trip to our branch library (packing some antivirus software with me) so that I can figure out a few issues she's having there. It sounds like nothing a simple reinstall of IE can't fix. Of course, Opera would be my browser of choice.

Through the wonders of a little program called WinsockFix, I got the damned 169.xxx.xxx IP address to release on the children's room Dell and reassigned it a new IP address. It was so easy. I wish I thought of it before.

Not such good news about the IBM in the children's room. One day it went to sleep and just never woke up. A great way for someone who's lived a rich long life to go, not so great for a computer. At least, not on my watch. Best I can tell, because there isn't a fan in the thing, and the children's room has the tendency to accumulate... well, stuff... around the vents, the chip cooked. Now I have extra memory to play with. And hard drives. And CD ROM drives.

But what we really need is like three more functioning computers.

Today a fight broke out over the internet terminals... an honest to goodness, we had to call the police fight. Thank god for our reference librarian (who was systems before me). I would have let them probably take each other out of the gene pool if they're going to fight like that over something other than food or shelter. I love technology: the internet is a good thing. It's not worth being a stinkin' barbarian over, though.

I am running our eval version of the time management software, while waiting for another vendor to contact me with their eval version as well. This seems to be reaching critical mass. I'd like to get the Macs printing, and leave the Macs up for non-card holders and the PCs for card holders. Simply necessity: They don't seem to make time management software for Macs. Suggestions are welcome (hint hint).

Monday, Horizon is being updated. Joy. I forsee lots of phone calls to Boston in my future.

Viruses.

I wasn't in trouble. Basically the whole story got twisted around in Boston, and came back to me that the assistant director called... when it was really me that called. Does this mean I got a promotion?

Today I have to bring the new computer that is tempermental about starting to the computer shop. I think it's a bad power supply. It's a cheapo brand 300 watt powering a cd rom and an A drive. I should probably get the vital stats on those machines. I think it's running at least a P3, quite possibly a P4 chip. At any rate, it starts every fifth time you press the button.

I doubt it's our wall outlets, which was the other possibility, because everything else starts just dandy.

I got my antivirus software at work just in time. Loads of it. I've installed some of it. I got the new virus in my inbox... Unicode text, binary attachment. I sent out a warning about it, figuring if I got it, it was probably blanket emailed to everyone at the library. I'm sure someone will click on it. Perhaps I should be sure to send my little message to the branch library as well. I just don't have the address right now.

Incredibly polite high man came in last night. He thanked me for removing him from the computer when we were closing.

Know what I like about working at the library versus working retail? At closing time, the library throws people's butts out of the library. No needing to hang around while people poke at the lizards and tease the turtles and decide whether they want to purchase the $.99 can of fish food.

Tomorrow, a trip to the branch library to figure out what's up with IE. Of course, I'd just install Opera and be done with it if it were up to me. I am so tempted to do it on all the public access terminals. Expand your horizons! Download an alternative browser today!

Paying it forward on the web.

Warning: This is one of those "everybody should be just like me" entries…
Seems like everyone is saying the end of the free web is coming, thanks to low click
through rates and increasing costs.
I like the idea that the web is for sharing and part of how I choose to pay for reading sites is by clicking on an ad. Slashdot and fark get several a day from me, while I've sent matt a couple bucks to keep mefi going. I try and support the sites I really like and use all the time.

But there's other ways to pay or get paid back. The search engines web dude
is a good example of that. Whatever his motivations are in submitting so
many stories, I pay him back by having a link back to his site on his
submissions. Each link, especially the ones that I change to "search engine
submissions" is my payment to him for sending in a story. It doesn't really cost anyone anything, but we both get something we need.

At LISNews, I like to think people pay us back by suggesting stories and clicking on
the google ads, but the former is true much more than the latter. The ads
have a click-through rate of well under 1% and if we're lucky we'll get
maybe 5 good submissions a day, most days it's more like one or two. But that's still pretty good, anything is better than nothing in the submissions area.

There's other ways to pay it back on the web, paypal and amazon both have
tip jar apps written, and bitpass and others are trying to make a go of the
second generation micropaymets system. It'll be interesting to see how those grow, or die.

Am I in trouble?

First off, yes, I am neurotic.

So last night, none of our catalogers could catalog, thanks to some network problems with Boston. Try getting someone in Boston at 4:59 pm. I managed to get a human being (not an answering machine) at about 5:03. Of course, he's not really the "fix the cataloging" problems guy, but he was a human being who could physically find another human being who could help fix the problem.

He was suitably apalled that we couldn't save records, so he went off in search of someone that could help me. Then I was told by the other librarians to get home, because I was making them look bad working overtime.

I probably should have stuck around, maybe, just a little... See where my neurosis comes in? I've been there a little under a month. Man, I am hard on myself. Anyway, this morning, I check my email (see where my neurosis comes in yet again?) and there is a message from the assistant director saying that he got someone in Boston and explained the problem and had it fixed.

Perhaps I should whip out the big guns before I go through the "proper channels" next time. Because the proper channels said, "I'm going home. Email me in the morning." Then, I didn't know how widespread the problem was. Reading between the lines (a key neurotic symptom) certainly makes it seem as though there were other issues going on I didn't know about. I need to implement some sort of reporting system.

The problem is, the support staff doesn't come to me a lot of the time when there is a problem. The other librarians, fortunately, do. Sometimes, if it's a problem with a particular record, I tell them to wait it out. But that certainly isn't the case every time. I don't know what would motivate them, though, to come tell me consistently. I would have a log book, but I don't think anyone would actually use it. Besides, people think it's something they did when the SQL error comes up, not something that the system did.

I also have to get better at being pushy. Like, there is a problem with Horizon today, fix it.

Never been a real supervisor before. I mean, I've supervised people, but never to this extent. Still wrestling with my promotion from peon to, um, less of a peon.

Who's Your Governor?

Upon reading about the Florida state library and its proposed exile by Governor Jeb Bush, I've concluded that there are a lot of strange governors out there. How did they get elected? Well, we sort of know how Gov. Schwartzenegger got elected (at least it hasn't left our collective memories as yet)... Same goes for my governor, George Pataki, former mayor of Poughkeepsie ...how did HE make it to the Governors mansion? Who's your governor, and how's he/she doing? Please add your comments...especially you Connecticut residents.

rebel technology

The fates were conspiring against me today. First, my supervisor and trainer called in, so I got to do the schedule in her place. It wouldn't have been a problem, except that there was no Monday schedule from last week to base it on. It was time to get creative. The trickiest thing was making sure everyone got lunch.

Fortunately, the info desk was very quiet from nine to ten, when I was the only librarian in the building.

Then I got a sales pitch from a vendor that shall remain nameless. I requested it, but I sort of had like twelve thousand other things going on, and just wanted very basic information. I hope I wasn't too rude.

I realized our Mac security software works poorly with IE. I ended up installing Netscape. I played some games though. First I left the icon for AIM up on the screen, and when you (try to) sign in, nothing happens. I centered the sign that says "No Instant Messaging" right above it. Tech librarian humor.

I also uninstalled Flash and Real Player. I'll be damned if someone is looking at movies at our ten minute Internet email terminal!

It made me smile... Someone tried to install Flash within twenty minutes of my putting it out there. But they couldn't download or execute it. Mwahahahahahahaha!

I also met with incredibly gross man today. First he was complaining because copies were $.15. Then he was upset because all our books on a certain trade exam were missing. But I showed him where the given trade books were anyway. And boy, could this guy burp. He illustrated his talents often... At the info desk, in the reading room, down the stairs, in the stacks. We're not talking little, "Oh, excuse me" burps, we're talking break the sound barrier, I just drank a whole keg of carbonated beer sort of burp.

At 4:58 (these things always happen between 4:55-4:59), Horizon started doing flips in Boston. None of our catalogers could catalog. So at 5:15 I was putting in a few extra minutes to give Boston a call. I think everyone went home.

Then I meant to send an email to the assistant director, and everyone got a copy. Whoops. Best be fixing my address book. At least there wasn't anything I'd say to my assistant director that I wouldn't say to any of the librarians.

"Poor" candidates

What is it about growing up in poverty/depravation that appeals to the American voter? Those of the Dems who can attest to being from modest beginnings are screaming it from the rooftops. Ok, so Dean and Kerry are affluent. Their parents were educated. They were privileged as children...they were probably read to each night at bedtime! Why apologize? I can't imagine any other country on earth where candidates for the highest office would be ashamed to have sprung from comfortable beginnings. What is it about modest means that appeals to us Yanks?
On the other hand, President Bush
of course grew up with a diamond-encrusted platinum spoon in his mouth. Hey, maybe that's why he has so much trouble talking.

long term projects

I have a couple of long term projects. One I think is sort of funny... wireless for the library. Why is this funny? Well, half the people that come in the library to use the computers have no idea how to use them. How would they benefit from wireless? And people with laptops... they might like wireless internet, but still insist on plugging in their laptop's power cord, which is against policy.

The second long term project is time access management software.

I had a request to disable the "log off" function on the public access terminals. This leads to the, er, obvious problems. We do need to be able to log off. And we do need to be able to shutdown (and I'd rather have a librarian logging in every half hour than a patron turning the computers on and off, and still needing a librarian to log in anyway). I could enable ctrl-alt-delete on those boxes again, but I don't want every schmuch ctrl-alt-deleting when our network is slow.

The network, my nemesis. I still don't understand, exactly, how the network at the library works. We're networked to a T1 line. Evidently we are behind a firewall that Boston uses. Windows is our responsibility. But I'm thinking we must have a server machine somewhere, although my predecessor says we don't. So where is our filtering software? Also in Boston, because it has to operate in front of the firewall. I think I need to talk to someone and get the low down on exactly how this whole thing knits together, before I start even pondering too deeply the ramifications, good and bad, of time managment software.

We simply can't afford a kiosk or another computer to manage internet reservations, and even if I could somehow rig the print server to act as as server for this as well (I'm not entirely convinced I can't), I don't relish the idea of having the librarians and support staff have to log on to the server to make appointments. The key here is to save time. And a self-service station requires more hardware. If any new hardware comes in, well, it's going to the staff. Or the unfiltered terminal, which is pre-1997.

Client only should work, even though it won't entirely eliminate our handy dandy sign up sheet entirely. Try finding variety in client only systems. And I would like it to work with Horizon, without having to be tweaked in Boston. And I would like it to work on Macs. Tall order. If you know of anything, please, please drop me a line.

My wish list for wireless? Yeah. Well, I'll get to that, when I'm entirely convinced it's a good idea. The assistant director suggested it, and I'm not sure he's entirely convinced it's a good idea either. I would rather be a late adopter and get it right, at least on this, methinks.

My first weekend off the ref desk

Ohmigawd! Ever since I was hired part-time as reference support staff in 1995, I have worked a Tuesday-Saturday schedule. This is my inaugural weekend as a M-F person. Of course, I'll be on a weekend rotation (every 3rd Saturday, every 6th weekend), but this is my first Friday to be home, chill out and know that I don't have to be up at any time I don't want to be up Saturday morning.

When I got my MSLIS degree in '98 and became a full-time, (capital L) Librarian, I was given the chance to adopt a M-F schedule. At that time I had younger kids--they had a lot of school holidays on Mondays, and they were with their papa on Saturdays, so it made sense to keep my Tue-Sat schedule. As they are older (10 and 13) and don't need (or want!) me as much, and have more Saturday activities, a good ol' Amerkian M-F schedule makes more sense (yeah, I still have one night per week, so it's not strictly a 9-5 deal).

Do you have any idea how long it's been since I've been to a garage sale?

Fist fights @ your library!

I was on information alone for the first time today. That's when everyone and their brother decided to come in. I had people dropping off posters and books and mail. I had people wanting new cards. I had people crashing the Macs (they like to freeze up and nothing but a hard reset will fix them), I had people with issues about their local post man (like I can help that), but the best of them all was the near-fist-fight.

It was young patron versus older patron. I don't know who was more trouble. It was over... what else... the internet. The older patron didn't want to sign up for the next slot because she didn't want to sign up for a computer that might not come available. I told her that was the policy. She told me she wasn't a moron. Of course, it would be easy enough to cross one's name off the high tech paper and golf pencil sign up sheet we have.

The young patron called her something less than polite, and she came to tell me. I got the young patron (who'd already been there an hour and half) off the computer, explaining that she'd been there over the amount of time we allow and others were waiting. She was fine with me, though knowing human nature, she might have been less than polite with the other lady.

Then it started. They started going at each other... First comments about manners, and civilization, and etiquette. I was waiting for them to whoosh out the boxing gloves. I stood there, like an idiot, just looking at them. My first thought was... we're getting this excited over Hotmail and Internet Explorer? So I stood there, unable to say anything, between the two of them. Believe me, I wanted to say something. But I couldn't think of anything that would sound professional. So I just let them glare at each other, and left when I was reasonably sure no one would get hurt.

Two patrons today (and lots of staff) mentioned time access/management software. I think it would help. People would be cheesed because they'd have to use a card for the internet, but hey. It is a library.

The unfiltered terminal's keyboard died this morning. No biggie, right? Yeah, it's one of those archiac pre-ps/2 keyboards. Believe it or not, I went in the computer cemetery and found one with the right adaptor that worked. I had to clean it off. I didn't want anyone to catch anything from the keyboard.

A well deserved weekend. Yay. I will spend it researching software and... the Toyota Prius!

And no powerpoint!

The whole thing was worth it, last night, when our director did her Howard Dean impression. What a scream.

So I wonder how many upper eschelons will have fundraiser hang over. No, no one was drinking, but I left at nine, when my coach turned into a pumpkin, and it was still going strong.

I got to explain the new print station yesterday, which was a might bit surprising for me. I came in, and suddenly I was giving a staff presentation.

I learned that none of us know where the toner is coming from for the printer, so I have to call about that today. Thank god laser toner lasts a bit.

I also realized my brochure for patrons on how to use the thing should come sooner rather than later.

This is the only time you'll hear me say this: The computers started acting out at the presentation, and boy was I glad. It kind of gave people an introduction to what to do when I'm not there and that happens. For most things, the assistant director wants only me touching the boxes (my preciousssssssssss) but I really think that most people can handle holding down a power button till the fans stop and then waiting ten seconds and pressing "on" again.

The director asked how I felt about the custodians switching the computers on in the morning. Hell, I don't care. As long as they don't kick them. Gotta leave something for the patrons to do.

The ornery machine is kept on the carpet, which bothers me. The alternative is to keep it on the edge of a tiny table, which also bothers me. The alternative I like the best is keeping it in my office.

It's Friday, the day the library is at half-staff. When the kids get out of school, the place is hopping. Last week there was a fight over the pay phone. Some kid came up to me after the fact and said, "That kid on the phone for an hour wasn't really talking to his mom." I never would have guessed.

Last Quotes from New Seeds of Contemplation

Off and on, I have been sharing selections from Thomas Merton's "New Seeds of Contemplation." I finished reading the book several weeks ago and continue to recommend it highly. I'm closing with a selection on peace and one about hate that I thought were especially valuable today, though they were written back in 1961. The years 1961 and 1962 brought threats to America's existance that make 9/11/2001 pale into insignificance.

From Chapter 16, "The Root of War is Fear"

"When I pray for peace I pray God to pacify not only the Russians and the Chinese but above all my own nation and myself. When I pray for peace I pray to be protected not only from the Reds but also from the folly and blindness of my own country. When I pray for peace, I pray not only the enemies of my country may cease to want war, but above all that my own country will cease to do the things that make war inevitable. In other words, when I pray for peace I am not just praying that the Russians will give up without a struggle and let us have our own way. I am praying that both we and the Russians may somehow be restored to sanity and learn how to work out our problems, as best we can, together, instead of preparing for global suicide."

From Chapter 24, "He who is not with Me is against Me."

"Do not be too quick to assume your enemy is a savage just because he is your enemy. Perhaps he is your enemy because he thinks you are a savage. Or perhaps he is afraid of you because he feels that you are afraid of him. And perhaps if he believed you were capable of loving him he would no longer be your enemy.

Do not be too quick to assume that your enemy is an enemy of God just because he is your enemy. Perhaps he is your enemy precisely because he can find nothing in you that gives glory to God. Perhaps he fears you because he can find nothing in you of God's love and God's kindness and God's patience and mercy and understanding of the weaknesses of men.

Do not be too quick to condemn the man who no longer believes in God, for it is perhaps your own coldness and avarice, your mediocrity and materialism, your sensuality and selfishness that have killed his faith."

This last section flows nicely into the book I'll start discussing on and off in the next few weeks -- Prisoners of Hate: The Congnitive basis of Anger, Hostility and Violence by Aaron Beck. A book with a Grand Unified Theory of Hate that explains barroom brawls, domestic violence, and the endless war in Chechnya with a single principle.

Take care until next time,

Special collections dreaming

So last night I dreamt about local history. Our local history department is located in the old building, and is ruled with an iron fist, and rightly so. There is some old stuff there, not the least of which is the refinished furniture.

No one is allowed to touch the refinished furniture. It's all placed around the gigantic old fireplace and old librarian office, to make a corner of the library look as it did 120 years ago or so. It's gorgeous. Check out Henry Hobson Richardson and the Small Public Library in America : A Study in Typology
by Kenneth A. Breisch. We're in there. I believe that's us on the cover; it certainly looks like us. I've never seen Richardson's other libraries in person, so I wonder how similar they all are.

Anyway, I had this dream that a class full of fifth graders came in and were climbing all over the furniture, and I was under the watchful eye of the director to get them under control.

When they left, I discovered they all wrote evil things about me in the poll books.

People can be so rude. There was a guy on a cell phone the other day at our public access terminals, just gabbing away and surfing the web. He wasn't even talking in a hushed voice. I directed him outside. On his way out I heard him say, "Yeah, the librarian kicked me out." The librarian. Cool.

Today is my first fundraiser (take a picture, mom, and put it in my baby book). It's a trivia thing. I have a lot to do at the library, but of course, this is a good opportunity to actually meet all the people that are involved in the library, so I guess I'll forgo the traditional library tasks today.

I can't wait for my new reference books to come!

The road to the library is paved with good intentions

I love the public. Really.

I made change for this guy out of my own pocket because he was having a real hard time figuring out what "Dollars full, please insert coins" meant. I was sort of on my way to do something else, so I had to help him out quickly.

I did learn it's easy to hide in the young adult room if you sit at the librarian's desk and move her ALA "Read" poster stand in front of the computer.

I installed OpenOffice.org on a few computers today. I don't want to bankrupt the library buying Office suites after I bought the very necessary staff antivirus. I use OO.o in Linux and it's very capable, and plays fairly nice with Word and Excel. It seems just as good in Windows. My direct supervisor is getting a copy tomorrow. Then she won't have to take work home.

Speaking of viruses, some nice person downloaded one on one of our new internet terminals. Of course, it's the internet terminal that doesn't want to start anyway. I guess this virus likes to randomly rename dlls. Ahem. Norton (public access computers, at least, are pretty protected) says there's nothing toxic on the computer. I hope it nailed it. I really don't want to play the old "regedit"/repair game. Things were working so nicely.

I ordered some health books for reference today. Updated our HIV books, and got a cancer encyclopedia. And some books on diabetes. Next up, atlases. How long has the Soviet Union been defunct?

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