Blogs

Authors@Google

Authors@Google: Gary Taubes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6vpFV6Wkl4

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2391404

Cites & Insights 14:3 (March 2014) available

Breaking the silence of project preparation to announce:

Cites & Insights 14:3 (March 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i3.pdf

That's a 32-page two-column PDF optimized for printing. If you're planning to read it online or on an e-device, I suggest the 61-page single-column 6" x 9" PDF optimized for viewing (and much smaller as a download) at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i3on.pdf

The issue includes:

The Front: Toward 15 and 200: Your Help Wanted pp. 1-3

Cites & Insights is in its 14th year and has passed Issue 170. I'm asking for help to encourage keeping it up to at least 15 and 200--and offering perks for donors.

Media: Thinking about Magazines pp. 3-24

Think print magazines are disappearing--or, worse, are just miscellaneous collections of articles? Think again. If you want a sense of the continuing importance of print magazines, maybe four words will suffice: World Wildlife and STAND--the new glossy print magazines from, respectively, World Wildlife Fund and the ACLU, both of which recognize the special power of a good magazine. This roundup includes some numbers and some perspectives. (No, Cites & Insights isn't a magazine; it's closer to a newsletter. And while a few journals are also magazines--Science, for example--most journals aren't magazines and most magazines aren't journals.)

The Back pp. 25-32

A baker's dozen of minisnarks (or, if you prefer, a dozen with lagniappe) on sound, prices, TED, silliness and casual (or ignorant) tech-sexism at "the newspaper of record."

 

Why I just published a useless book.

I just used Kindle Direct Publishing to learn the steps so I could offer this as a library program, basically:

1. create document in Word
2. add chapter headings and format each chapter with an appropriate heading style
3. have Word build the table of contents based on chapters
4. save as "web page, filtered"
5. create account at Amazon
6. complete KDP account info, including W-9, bank routing and account number, for royalty payments
7. add book, enter book metadata, upload book, create cover, set price and sales countries
8. publish book

The book is called One Million Bananas, and it's just the word banana over and over 1,000,000 times. Which in hindsight is just way too many bananas. But now I can teach others, and that's the real purpose. Unless you buy a copy, or a thousand, then we'll see how I feel.

Why a conservative economist moved to the country

PBS NewsHour piece

Economics correspondent Paul Solman profiles Chris Martenson, a former science professional who gave up his large home and high-status job for life in rural Massachusetts. From there he began expressing his deep dissatisfaction with the way the U.S. economy works and garnered a growing following on his website, Peak Prosperity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPTDYD3K-Ks

Cites & Insights 14:2 (February 14) available

The February 2014 issue of Cites & Insights (volume 14, number 2) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i2.pdf.

The two-column print-oriented (and optimized for printing) PDF is 42 pages long.

If you're planning to read it on a tablet or online, you may prefer the 80-page 6" x 9" single-column version (not optimized for printing) at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i2on.pdf

This issue completes the book-length discussion of ebook issues. It contains:
Perspective: E and P: What I Ignored pp. 1-2

Possible motivations behind some comments and stances on pbooks and ebooks

Intersections: It Seems Like the Obvious Case: Ebooks as Textbooks pp. 2-15

For more than a decade I've assumed that textbooks represented the obvious billion-dollar (well, multi-billion-dollar) market for ebooks. It turns out not to be that easy.

Libraries: Ebooks and Libraries pp. 15-42

This discussion leaves out way too much and probably grossly oversimplifies the situation, but I do discuss some items having to do with the philosophical and general issues, problems, publishers and vendors, Kindles and libraries, and Douglas County and friends.

Cites & Insights 14.1 (January 2014) available

Now entering its fourteenth (!) year, the January 2014 Cites & Insights is now available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i1.pdf

The issue is 32 pages long. The single-column "online version" is 62 pages long.

This issue includes:
The Front (p. 1)

A few notes on reaching the fourteenth year.

Words: Books, E and P (pp. 1-25)

Books and the media in which they appear--and note the "E and P" rather than "E vs. P," although some of the items are distinctly "versus."

Media: 50 Movie Gunslinger Classics, Part 1

"Gunslingers" doesn't mean Westerns, although some of these are. It appears to mean that somebody in the movie has a gun. It's an...odd...set.

Amazon might lose interest in total hegemony over the book business before they achieve it

Indie Bookstores Don't Take Kindly To Amazon's Kindle Offer

Distorted Mirror of Wikipedia

Standing Bear Talk

SCSU Library Grad Program Loses ALA Accreditation

Cites & Insights 13:12 (December 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:12 (December 2013) is now available for download at http://citesandinsights.info/civ13i12.pdf.

The issue is 34 pages long.

The single-column 6" x 9" "online version," optimized for faster download and online or tablet reading, is also available--http://citesandinsights.info/civ13i12on.pdf

The issue contains one essay:
Words: The Ebook Marketplace, Part 2 pp. 1-34

More on the last few years in the ebook marketplace, this time focusing on ebook pricing, ebook and ereader sales, software, the past and future, (intentional) humor, rights--not so much DRM as ebook readers' rights, and a few miscellaneous pieces.

If you're waiting for "ebooks and pbooks" (note and, not versus)...that's coming in January 2014.

This completes Volume 13.

The indices will only be available as part of the print version of Volume 13, which will be announced when it's ready, probably some time within the next couple of weeks.

 

Odd graffiti

Graffiti on trains is common. Graffiti on trains commenting on the Internet? Not so common.

See: http://imgur.com/5UhogHi

River City Empire

River City Empire: Tom Dennison's Omaha
More than any other political boss of the early twentieth century, Thomas Dennison, “the Rogue who ruled Omaha,” was a master of the devious. Unlike his contemporaries outside the Midwest, he took no political office and was never convicted of a crime during his thirty-year reign. He was a man who managed saloons but never cared for alcohol; who may have incited the Omaha Race Riot of 1919 but claimed he never harmed a soul; who stood aside while powerful men did his bidding. His power came not from coercion or nobility but from delegation and subterfuge.

Orville D. Menard chronicles Dennison’s life in River City Empire, beginning with Dennison’s experiences in Colorado mining towns. In 1892 Dennison came to Omaha, Nebraska, where he married and started a family while solidifying his position as an influential political boss. Menard explores machine politics in Omaha as well as the man behind this machine, describing how Dennison steered elections, served the legitimate and illegitimate business communities, and administered justice boss-style to control crime and corruption. The microcosm of Omaha provides an opportunity for readers to explore bossism in a smaller environment and sheds light on the early twentieth-century American political climate as a whole.

Architecture at home in it's community

Buying into big-time college football: the 'System' behind the sport

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/crime/article3793618.ece

The Antiquarian Librarian This Week, October 20, 2013>

The following are the 10 most popular articles this week on the Antiquarian Librarian blog. Not every article is directly related to librarianship, but since librarians need to be in the know about everything, to relates in one way or another to our work.

What to Name the Washington Football Team? http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/what-to-name-washington-football-team.html This article came our of recent discussions about alternative names for the Redskins.

A Heart Shaped Like Texas: The Breakthrough List, October 11, 2013 http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/a-heart-shaped-like-texas-breakthrough.html This is my top 50 list in roots music for the week ending October 11, 2013.

CFBA Book Review: The Nurse's Secret Suitor by Cheryl Wyatt http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/cfba-book-review-nurses-secret-suitor.html This is a Christian fiction book review via Christian Fiction Blog Alliance.

World Series Trivial http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/world-series-trivial.html This post came out of some baseball research I did for one of our library's display makers.

The Most In Demand Employers on LinkedIn http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-most-in-demand-employers-on-linkedin... This post describes a LinkedIn page that tracks the businesses with the most job requests/ discussed.

Good Times: The Breakthrough List, October 18, 2013 http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/good-times-breakthrough-list-october-18.... This is the top 50 roots music list for the week ending October 18, 2013.

7 practical business storytelling tips http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/7-practical-business-storytelling-tips.html

Finalists for 2014 One Book One Nebraska Announced http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/finalists-for-2014-one-book-one.html -- Read More

Ohio Board of Education President Wants Toni Morrison Novel Scrubbed from State Common Core Materials

Ohio Board of Education President Debe Terhar wants all mentions of the Toni Morrison novel The Bluest Eye removed from state guidelines for schools teaching to the new Common Core academic standards. The novel tells the story of a young black girl living in Lorain, Ohio, who dreams of having blue eyes so that she will be as beautiful and beloved as white children.  

Read more on State Impact

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