Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

The pioneering young scientist whose work on the structure of small worlds has triggered an avalanche of interest in networks.

Cites & Insights 14:7 (July 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:7 (July 2014) is now available for downloading at

That URL is for the traditional two-column print-oriented ejournal. If you plan to read the journal on a computer, a tablet or other e-device (and if you plan to follow links), you're much better off--especially in this case--downloading the single-column online-oriented version at

[Links may not work from the two-column version. Conversely, some boldface may not show up in the one-column version. This issue has two dozen tables, some of which have smaller type in the two-column version, making the one-column version easier to read.]

The two-column version is 24 pages long. The single-column 6x9 version is 45 pages long.

The issue consists of a single essay, all original material (except for a few excerpts from publisher pages):

Journals, "Journals" and Wannabes: Investigating the List (pp. 1-24)

Jeffrey Beall's 4P (potential, probable, possible predatory) publisher and journal lists total 9,219 journals in early April 2014.

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) totals 9.822 journals as of early June 2014.

9,219 is 93.9% of 9,822.

But: 90.8% of the journals in DOAJ are not represented in Beall's lists.

A paradox? Not really.

Cites & Insights 14:6 (June 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:6 (June 2014) is now available for downloading at

The print-oriented two-column version is 16 pages long. You may also view or download a 32-page one-column 6x9" ereader-oriented version at

This issue includes three sections:
The Front: Beyond the Damage (pp. 1-4)

Libraries that subscribe to Library Technology Reports should, some time in the next few days or weeks, receive "Big-Deal Serial Purchasing: Tracking the Damage"--and academic libraries that don't subscribe to LTR may want to purchase this edition from ALA Editions. It brings last year's The Big Deal and the Damage Done forward to cover 2002-2012 and offers a tighter and more sophisticated view of the situation. (Spoiler alert: Things got worse from 2010 to 2012)

Simultaneously, I'm publishing Beyond the Damage: Circulation, Coverage and Staffing, a book looking at some other aspects of academic libraries and how they changed between 2002 and 2012. It's available in two forms, each $45: a 130-page paperback with color graphs--or a site-licensed PDF ebook with precisely the same content. Easiest way to find it: go to and search "Crawford beyond damage" (no quotes needed)--that currently yields just the two versions.

Media: Mystery Collection, part 7 (pp. 4-12)

For the first time, most of these movies are in color--which doesn't necessarily mean they're better, as this is also (I believe) the first time I've given up on movies before they're finished in five out of 24 cases. There are some gems, but also some real dross here.

Library memes

Preserving the LA story, one block at a time

The city of Los Angeles is constantly reinventing itself. But now, a project called "Survey L.A." is digging beneath the city's layers to identify, catalogue and preserve its diverse cultural history in electronic form. Jeffrey Brown reports on this effort to map the history of a relatively new and rapidly developing city.

Frustration in the White House press corps

Frustration is growing in the White House press corps due to limited access to the "transparency" president. In a piece that originally aired last year, Bob goes to the White House to find out how the role of the press corps is changing under this media savvy administration.

How a national spike in incarcerations affects communities

How a national spike in incarcerations affects communities

Since 1973, the rate of incarceration in the United States has quadrupled, with more than 2 million people now behind bars. Jeffrey Brown talks to Jeremy Travis of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice about a new report that examines the causes and consequences of this explosion and recommends ways to cut down the figures.

Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program

Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program

My House Our House

My House Our House: Living Far Better for Far Less in a Cooperative Household

The Dilemma of the First Sale Doctrine in the Context of Foreign-Manufactured Goods

The Dilemma of the First Sale Doctrine in the Context of Foreign-Manufactured Goods
Full article here.

Publishers and books are some of the major parties and items in these cases.

Cites & Insights 14:5 (May 2014) available

The May 2014 Cites & Insights (14:5) is now available for downloading.

You'll find it at for the 34-page print-oriented two-column version

or at for the 65-page 6x9 online/tablet-oriented single-column version.

The issue includes two essays:
Ethics and Access 2: The So-Called Sting (pp. 1-20)

John Bohannon wrote a news article in Science that either shows that many open access journals with APC charges have sloppy (or no) peer review...or shows almost nothing at all. This story discusses the article itself, offers a number of responses to it--and then adds something I don't believe you'll find anywhere else: A journal-by-journal test of whether the journals involved would pass a naive three-minute sniff test as to whether they were plausible targets for article submissions without lots of additional checking. Is this really a problem involving a majority of hundreds of journals--or maybe one involving 27% (that is, 17) of 62 journals? Read the story; make up your own mind.

Future Libraries: A Roundup (pp. 21-34)

Pretty much what the title suggests--not a sequel to a nineteen-year-old book I coauthored, but a roundup of some thoughts from other folks.

A note on formatting

Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 as kindling.

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

In the encyclopedia world an entry like that is called a Mountweazel

See New Yorker article about Mountweazel:

The Odd Clauses

The Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution Through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions
If the United States Constitution were a zoo, and the First, Fourth, and Fourteenth amendments were a lion, a giraffe, and a panda bear, respectively, then The Odd Clauses would be a special exhibit of shrews, wombats, and bat-eared foxes. Past the ever-popular monkey house and lion cages, Boston University law professor Jay Wexler leads us on a tour of the lesser-known clauses of the Constitution, the clauses that, like the yeti crab or platypus, rarely draw the big audiences but are worth a closer look. Just as ecologists remind us that even a weird little creature like a shrew can make all the difference between a healthy environment and an unhealthy one, understanding the odd clauses offers readers a healthier appreciation for our constitutional system. With Wexler as your expert guide through this jurisprudence jungle, you’ll see the Constitution like you’ve never seen it before.


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