Blogs

Cheap Art: Want to Buy a Warhol?

The Dilemma of the First Sale Doctrine in the Context of Foreign-Manufactured Goods

The Dilemma of the First Sale Doctrine in the Context of Foreign-Manufactured Goods
Full article here.

Publishers and books are some of the major parties and items in these cases.

Cites & Insights 14:5 (May 2014) available

The May 2014 Cites & Insights (14:5) is now available for downloading.

You'll find it at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i5.pdf for the 34-page print-oriented two-column version

or at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i5on.pdf for the 65-page 6x9 online/tablet-oriented single-column version.

The issue includes two essays:
Intersections:
Ethics and Access 2: The So-Called Sting (pp. 1-20)

John Bohannon wrote a news article in Science that either shows that many open access journals with APC charges have sloppy (or no) peer review...or shows almost nothing at all. This story discusses the article itself, offers a number of responses to it--and then adds something I don't believe you'll find anywhere else: A journal-by-journal test of whether the journals involved would pass a naive three-minute sniff test as to whether they were plausible targets for article submissions without lots of additional checking. Is this really a problem involving a majority of hundreds of journals--or maybe one involving 27% (that is, 17) of 62 journals? Read the story; make up your own mind.

Libraries
Future Libraries: A Roundup (pp. 21-34)

Pretty much what the title suggests--not a sequel to a nineteen-year-old book I coauthored, but a roundup of some thoughts from other folks.

A note on formatting

Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 as kindling.

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story
http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2014/03/18/290236647/an-imaginary-town-becomes-real-then-n...

In the encyclopedia world an entry like that is called a Mountweazel

See New Yorker article about Mountweazel:
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/08/29/050829ta_talk_alford

The Odd Clauses

The Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution Through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions
If the United States Constitution were a zoo, and the First, Fourth, and Fourteenth amendments were a lion, a giraffe, and a panda bear, respectively, then The Odd Clauses would be a special exhibit of shrews, wombats, and bat-eared foxes. Past the ever-popular monkey house and lion cages, Boston University law professor Jay Wexler leads us on a tour of the lesser-known clauses of the Constitution, the clauses that, like the yeti crab or platypus, rarely draw the big audiences but are worth a closer look. Just as ecologists remind us that even a weird little creature like a shrew can make all the difference between a healthy environment and an unhealthy one, understanding the odd clauses offers readers a healthier appreciation for our constitutional system. With Wexler as your expert guide through this jurisprudence jungle, you’ll see the Constitution like you’ve never seen it before.

National Reading Month

As part of National Reading Month Amazon is reducing the price of several books that they label "Books that inspired our passion to read"

Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales ($1.99)

Some of the other titles:

Cites & Insights 14:4 (April 2014) available

The April 2014 issue of Cites & Insights (volume 14, issue 4, whole # 172) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i4.pdf

The print-oriented two-column edition is 22 pages.

Those reading online or on a tablet may prefer the 6x9" single-column version, which is 41 pages long, at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i4on.pdf

This issue includes two essays:

Right to Farm Statutes and the Changing State of Modern Agriculture

Right to Farm Statutes and the Changing State of Modern Agriculture
http://goo.gl/MPa5Z9

Authors@Google

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2391404

Cites & Insights 14:3 (March 2014) available

Breaking the silence of project preparation to announce:

Cites & Insights 14:3 (March 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i3.pdf

Why I just published a useless book.

I just used Kindle Direct Publishing to learn the steps so I could offer this as a library program, basically:

Why a conservative economist moved to the country

PBS NewsHour piece

Economics correspondent Paul Solman profiles Chris Martenson, a former science professional who gave up his large home and high-status job for life in rural Massachusetts. From there he began expressing his deep dissatisfaction with the way the U.S. economy works and garnered a growing following on his website, Peak Prosperity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPTDYD3K-Ks

Cites & Insights 14:2 (February 14) available

The February 2014 issue of Cites & Insights (volume 14, number 2) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i2.pdf.

The two-column print-oriented (and optimized for printing) PDF is 42 pages long.

Cites & Insights 14.1 (January 2014) available

Now entering its fourteenth (!) year, the January 2014 Cites & Insights is now available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i1.pdf

The issue is 32 pages long. The single-column "online version" is 62 pages long.

This issue includes:
The Front (p. 1)

A few notes on reaching the fourteenth year.

Amazon might lose interest in total hegemony over the book business before they achieve it

Indie Bookstores Don't Take Kindly To Amazon's Kindle Offer

Distorted Mirror of Wikipedia

Standing Bear Talk

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs