Blogs

Tales from the library...

http://libtales.blogspot.com/

After working in a public library for several years I have accumulated all kinds of crazy stories to tell. After my animated re-tellings, friends and family often joke with me about how I should create a website to share some of my funny, crazy, and touching experiences from work - so this blog has been long overdue!

Please feel free to submit some of your own "tales from the library" - whether you are a patron or an employee! The good, the bad, the unexpected, scary, hilarious, horrendous, enlightening - you can email them all to me, along with your name, at librarytales01@gmail.com
(Neither your email nor your last name will be published - only your first name or screen name.)

I look forward to hearing from you all, and to sharing some of my own experiences with the world as well!

Netflix Helps People Cut Cable Cord, Report Says

Article in the NYT: Netflix Helps People Cut Cable Cord, Report Says

Summary: A new survey notes that customers who use Netflix streaming video are twice as likely to cancel or slim down their cable services as they were this time last year.

Comment: I cancelled cable this year. Netflix combined with over the air television has worked good for us. Having a device like a Roku or Wii that will allow you to put the content on your tv instead of just watching on laptop I think really pushes this idea over the tipping point.

Kindle price melts

In the comments to this story on LISNEWS there is a comment about buying the book Ice Diaries in print instead on ebook format because of price.

Part of what the commentor said: "From what I have seen ebook buyers are very price conscious. When Amazon came out with the Kindle and said that they were going to try and set ebook prices at $9.99 I did not think that was cheap. I wanted ebook prices to range from .99 to $2.99."

Amazon is currently holding an ebook sale and they have the book The Ice Diaries: The True Story of One of Mankind's Greatest Adventures for $1.99 as an ebook. What is the range for the books in the Amazon sale? It is $0.99 to $2.99

I find it ironic that the book mentioned by the person ends up in a sale that had a price range that matches the range that they thought was fair. Here is a link to the sale.

Pawn Stars

Rick Harrison of the History Channel show Pawn Stars has a book out. You can see the book here.

He was interviewed on the NPR radio show "Fresh Air". You can listen to the interview here.

If you do not have speakers on your computer there is a button you can click at the NPR site that will give the entire transcript. Here is a direct link to the transcript.

The YA Literature Rant and Rail

I’m not sure what angers me more about the recent article by Meghan Gurdon in the Wall Street Journal about the coarseness, violence, and overall lack of quality in young adult books today: her insistence that any books that give teens a look at reality is bad for them or can even promote destructive and infectious behavior, or the list of “Books We Can Recommend for Young Adult Readers” on the side of article, broken down into books for boys and girls.

Full article: http://www.closedstacks.com/?p=3336

Can Work Previously Held In The Public Domain Be Recopyrighted?

A legal battle that examines whether Congress has the right to recopyright works that were already placed into the public domain will take place during the Supreme Court's October session. The plantiff is Lawrence Golan a conductor at the University of Denver where the decision has been detrimental to his program as the increased cost of newly copyrighted works has placed a large selection of previously accessible material off limits. The law which was passed in 1994, gave foreign works the same legal protection that US works enjoy. This has huge implications for the digitization efforts of libraries across the country. If Mr. Golan wins his suit, libraries will feel much more comfortable making a great number of foreign-produced work more accessible through digitization.

http://chronicle.com/article/A-Professors-Fight-Over/127700/

Apple Patents Way to Prevent Concert Piracy

A new patent filed by Apple could help the music and movie industries thwart copyright violation by disabling mobile phone cameras that try to record concerts and movies.

Full story

The library at Schipol Airport in the Netherlands

Recently went through Schipol Airport and had a chance to visit the little library that was mentioned in a LISNews article last year. Really nice when you're stuck for something to do (besides buying tulips or chocolate!)
Here are photos that my husband took with his iPhone:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/abirdie/5793384429/in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/abirdie/5793383449/in/photostream

Amazon Sunshine Deals

Amazon is having a sale on 600 Kindle books through June 15. The books are price from $0.99 to $2.99.
You can see them here.

A few selections:

Write Great Fiction - Plot & Structure $1.99

Young Men and Fire $1.99

If a Pirate I Must Be...: The True Story of Black Bart, King of the Caribbean Pirates $1.99 -- Read More

New to Blogging

Hello! I am a Certified School Library Media Specialist and I have started my own blog with Blogger. I am trying to include things that will make my blog unique, useful, and worth the time to visit. What type of information do you feel is really needed in a Library Blog? Book reviews? Lesson plans? Any advice is appreciated. jfsanborn.blogspot.com

Interesting Debate on the Role of the DPLA

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) recently asked the library community to join together and take part in their Beta Sprint. The idea is to move away from theory and actually start building some ideas. Still, like any ambitious idea such as this, it is unclear what role the end product will serve.

For those looking to learn more about this project or just to read an interesting debate on the role of massive digital libraries, the Library Journal has posted a Point-Counterpoint consisting of David Rothman who believes that there should be at least two versions of the DPLA and that it one of those versions should fulfill a primarily "public library" role as opposed to the other more scholarly projects that already exist versus John Palfrey who believes all hands need to work together on a unified project at first that can be carved up later as needed.

http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/890732-264/a_point-counterpoint_on_the_digital.html.csp

Gaming the Archives

From the Chronicle of Higher Ed
May 23, 2011, 5:13 pm
By Jennifer Howard

There’s no shortage of fabulous archival material lurking in college and university collections. The trick is finding it.

Without good metadata—labels that tell researchers and search engines what’s in a photograph, say—those archives are as good as closed to many students and scholars. But many institutions don’t have the resources or manpower to tag their archives thoroughly.

Enter Metadata Games, an experiment in harnessing the power of the crowd to create archival metadata. A team of designers at Dartmouth College, working with archivists there, has created game interfaces that invite players to tag images, either playing alone or with a partner (sometimes a human, sometimes a computer). Solo players think up tags to describe the images they see; in the two-player scenario, partners try to come up with the same tag or tags.....Read the rest here....

Why is the Nook Color a hit among women?

While plenty of people still aren't quite sure what to make of Barnes & Noble's Nook Color, the device seems to have homed in on one target market with laser precision — women. According to The New York Times, publishers have been surprised to see sales of women's digital magazines soar on the Nook, at times even eclipsing issue sales on the far more popular iPad. Cosmopolitan, Women's Health, and O, The Oprah Magazine were among the Nook e-publishing success stories cited.

Full article

Comment on the Lions

This story on LISNEWS: New Yorker Cover Says It All asks the question - Is this what the future holds for public libraries, all libraries?

Comments do not seem to be enabled for that story. If you want to give an answer to that question you can do it here.

Where the Young and Tech-Savvy Go

From the WSJ Digits blog

What can Foursquare tell us about how people live?

The location-based social network, which lets people “check in” to places using their mobile phones, has about 8 million users and is used more than 1.5 million times a day world-wide.

To learn about where people go and what they do on Foursquare, Digits collected every check-in on the service for a week earlier this year, via the Foursquare “firehose.” And what did we find? ... Read the rest here with cool visualizations

Wanted: Your Ideas on How to Build a Digital Public Library of America

From the Chronicle of Higher Ed
May 20, 2011, 12:01 am
By Jennifer Howard

Think you know what the proposed Digital Public Library of America should look like? Now’s your chance to weigh in. The project’s steering committee has just announced a “Beta Sprint,” inviting the public to contribute “ideas, models, prototypes, technical tools, user interfaces, etc.” Anyone who wants to take part must submit a statement of interest by June 15, and final submissions are due September 1. Read more here

At Home on the Farm and in E-Books

Susan Orlean’s new book, a long essay called “Animalish,” about her love of animals, was written for Amazon’s Kindle Singles collection.

More here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/19/books/susan-orlean-writes-animalish-as-an-e-book.html?ref=...

"Yes, Virginia, Google was Screwing with You." (The Filter Bubble)

In 2009, I wrote posts where I suspected that Google was screwing with me when it showed me search results.

"Do a search for yourself one day and Google will use its standard search algorithm to find standard results. But do that same search a different day, and Google will run its special beta algorithm and return results that it thinks you want. Then it looks to see what you do next. If you click on page after page of results, it assumes you, the person, are somehow related to those results since you read through more of them than a casual searcher might. And Google learns from this and becomes smarter."

So I'm glad that the new book, The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You, is confirming my suspicions: the internet knows who I am, but it loves me, anyway.

But as librarians, this hidden internet sucks. What happens when you share a computer at the service desk? And you do a search and click some links and the Google wraps you in that safe, protective bubble? What happens at the shift change? A second librarian sits at the desk and enters your bubble. And now all the searches are filtered for you, but the second librarian isn't you... won't is seem to the second librarian that Google suddenly started sucking? That it can't find anything the second librarian wants? -- Read More

Why love books.

Yes, your iPad is great. And your PS3 with Blu-ray is awesome. And your Kindle kicks ass. But these technological marvels are nothing compared to a book.

A book challenges us on a personal level. We meet the challenge of new words and ideas and we either find agreement or argument, but we rarely remain the same person we were before.

A book requires no power but sunlight and your mind. There is no controller to blame for your crappy performance on Call of Duty, or whatever games you play. There is no wifi hotspot to go down. There is nothing to buy. A book is the object and the exercise and the reward, all rolled into one.

Apple and Amazon and Sony and Google tell us that their technology will change the world. And I keep waiting. But books have already changed the world and continue to change it.

Some technologies are perfect in design and function. A book is one.

It would be nice to be able to find things in them faster. But maybe I'm just impatient.

Cites & Insights 11:6 available

Cites & Insights 11:6, June/July 2011, is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ11i6.pdf

More info here: http://lisnews.org/cites_amp_insights_116_available

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